Screen Shot 2022-06-16 at 8.17.16 AMThis is the final grouping of 50 to count down the 1000 Greatest Films of the first Century of Film (1912-2011).

The original introduction can be found here.  Other parts can be found here.

The films in this portion rate at a 98 down through Modern Times and a 99 after that.

After some other posts, there will be an update that covers the years 2012-2016.  Then after some other posts, there will be another update that will cover the years 2017-2021.

#50

trainspotting_ver3Trainspotting

  • Director:  Danny Boyle
  • Genre:  Horror  (Urban Horror)
  • Distributor:  Miramax
  • Year:  1995  (OE: 1996)
  • Country:  England
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, BSFC), Director (NH), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA, BAFTA), Actor (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $16,491,080
  • Entry Rank:  #45
  • TSPDT Rank:  #549
  • The Film:  It exploded like a burst of energy in its trailer alone (which I recall as just being the toilet scene) and the Scottish accents were so impenetrable that I immediately saw it a second time and that cemented it in my brain as one of my favorite films of the decade as well as one of the most brilliant.  Plus, Kelly MacDonald.  Full review here.  The ninth best film not to win the Nighthawk and the second-to-last pairing of a film that is basically at a tie for #1 in its year, ending up directly behind the winner on my all-time list.

#49

lone_star_ver1Lone Star

  • Director:  John Sayles
  • Genre:  Mystery  (Cop)
  • Distributor:  Sony Pictures Classics
  • Year:  1996
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, CC), Director (NH), Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA, GG), Actor (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $12,408,986
  • Entry Rank:  #45
  • The Film:  The two best films of a truly great year for film (with remarkable and remarkably different styles of editing) and the Academy shrugged and said “We nominated the script, what more do you want?”  Full review here.  The film that has made my mom endlessly search for another one where Chris Cooper plays “the good guy.”  The sixth Sayles film on the list.

#48

hannah_and_her_sistersHannah and Her Sisters

  • Director:  Woody Allen
  • Genre:  Comedy  (Romantic)
  • Distributor:  Orion
  • Year:  1986
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, LAFC), Director (NH, DGA, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, NBR), Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA, BAFTA, GG, LAFC, BSFC), Actor (BAFTA, BAFTA), Actress (BAFTA), S. Actor (NH, AA, GG), S. Actress (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, NBR), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $40,084,041
  • Entry Rank:  #37
  • TSPDT Rank:  #527
  • The Film:  After placing himself and Mia front and center for so long, Woody steps back and makes it more of an ensemble piece and the result is magnificent, with numerous acting and writing accolades and his best film as a whole (and 17th in the Top 1000 – tied for the most of any director).  Full review here.

#47

grapes_of_wrathThe Grapes of Wrath

  • Director:  John Ford
  • Genre:  Drama  (Lit Adaptation – Steinbeck)
  • Distributor:  20th Century-Fox
  • Year:  1940
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, NYFC, NBR), Director (NH, AA, NYFC), A. Screenplay (NH, AA), Actor (NH, AA), S. Actor (NH), S. Actress (NH, AA), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #7
  • TSPDT Rank:  #184
  • The Film:  Is it more ridiculous that Henry Fonda lost to Jimmy Stewart for The Philadelphia Story or that Fonda wasn’t nominated for an Oscar again after this for 41 years (when he won basically a sympathy vote and then died)?  One of the most magnificent examples of a book-to-screen adaptation with both in my Top 50 all-time.  Full review here.  The 7th Ford film on the list.

#46

Glory

  • Director:  Ed Zwick
  • Genre:  War  (Civil War)
  • Distributor:  TriStar Pictures
  • Year:  1989
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, GG), Director (NH, GG), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA, GG), S. Actor (NH, NH, AA, GG), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $26,979,166
  • Entry Rank:  #37
  • The Film:  My #1 film of 1989 from the day I saw it (MLK Day, the weekend it opened in the suburbs) and I still remember how crushed I was a few weeks later when it was passed over for Picture, Director and Screenplay at the Oscars.  Full review here.

#45

treasure_of_the_sierra_madreThe Treasure of the Sierra Madre

  • Director:  John Huston
  • Genre:  Western  (Lit Adaptation)
  • Distributor:  Warner Bros.
  • Year:  1948
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC), Director (NH, AA, GG, NYFC), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA, WGA, AA, NBR), Actor (NH, NBR), S. Actor (NH, NH, AA, GG), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #13
  • TSPDT Rank:  #236
  • The Film:  The best performance of Bogart’s career and it couldn’t even manage him an Oscar nomination.  And, after it hadn’t happened since 1935, the first of three films in four years to win Director and Screenplay at the Oscars but lose Picture which wouldn’t happen again after that for almost another half-century (when it would happen three times in six years).  The 9th Huston film on the list (with one more to go).  Full review here.

#44

pulp_fictionPulp Fiction

  • Director:  Quentin Tarantino
  • Genre:  Crime
  • Distributor:  Miramax
  • Year:  1994
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, PGA, BAFTA, GG, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, NBR), Director (NH, DGA, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR), Screenplay (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC), Actor (SAG, AA, BAFTA, GG, LAFC), Actress (BAFTA), S. Actor (NH, SAG, AA, BAFTA, GG), S. Actress (NH, SAG, AA, GG), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $107,928,762
  • WW Gross:  $213,928,762
  • Entry Rank:  #40
  • TSPDT Rank:  #64
  • The Film:  The highest example of the two films from the same year being so close they’re together on the all-time list.  On the list with Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Citizen Kane, M*A*S*H and Chinatown for all-time classics who only won Screenplay at the Oscars.  Full review here.  Quentin’s 6th film on the list but he’d only made 7 by 2011.

#43

ed_wood_ver1Ed Wood

  • Director:  Tim Burton
  • Genre:  Comedy  (True Story – Hollywood)
  • Distributor:  Disney  (Touchstone)
  • Year:  1994
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH), Director (NH), A. Screenplay (NH), Actor (NH), S. Actor (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $5,887,457
  • Entry Rank:  #39
  • TSPDT Rank:  #803
  • The Film:  These two films are not only from the same year but they opened (and I saw them) on successive weekends with Pulp Fiction, of course, crushing Ed Wood by a mile (Big Eyes is the only other Burton film to not make more than 7x this at the box office) but it’s basically universally acknowledged as Burton’s best film.  His 6th film on the list.  Full review here.

#42

paths_of_gloryPaths of Glory

  • Director:  Stanley Kubrick
  • Genre:  War  (World War I)
  • Distributor:  United Artists
  • Year:  1957
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, BAFTA), Director (NH), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA), Actor (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #22
  • TSPDT Rank:  #228
  • The Film:  The unluckiest film ever at the Nighthawks, going 0 for 10 and finishing 2nd place to Bridge on the River Kwai 8 times but luckier than at the Oscars and Globes where it earned no noms at all.  The best anti-war film for really showing the cost of war.  Full review here.

#41

clockwork_orangeA Clockwork Orange

  • Director:  Stanley Kubrick
  • Genre:  Horror  (Urban Horror)
  • Distributor:  Warner Bros.
  • Year:  1971
  • Country:  England
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC), Director (NH, DGA, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA, BAFTA), Actor (NH, GG)
  • N.A. Gross:  $26,617,553
  • Entry Rank:  #27
  • TSPDT Rank:  #77
  • The Film:  The 8th and 9th Kubrick films on the list but he’s not actually done yet and he’s not actually the highest example of a director appearing back-to-back on the list.  Another brilliant book-to-screen adaptation that it both extremely funny and utterly horrifying.  Full review here.

#40

on_the_waterfrontOn the Waterfront

  • Director:  Elia Kazan
  • Genre:  Drama  (Social)
  • Distributor:  Columbia
  • Year:  1954
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, NBR), Director (NH, DGA, AA, GG, NYFC), Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA), Actor (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC), S. Actor (NH, NH, NH, AA, AA, AA), S. Actress (NH, AA), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $9,600,000
  • Entry Rank:  #19
  • TSPDT Rank:  #158
  • The Film:  The rare Oscar smash that was as good the awards it got (it actually does even better at the Nighthawks than than 8 for 12 at the Oscars) and the total awards list would be a lot longer if it were a later film or if the Globes had nominees that year instead of just winners.  Full review here.  Kazan and Brando have another team-up on the list left.

#39

ran
(Ran)

  • Director:  Akira Kurosawa
  • Genre:  Drama  (Shakespeare – Tragedy)
  • Distributor:  Orion Classics
  • Year:  1985
  • Country:  Japan  (Japanese)
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, NSFC, BSFC), Director (NH, AA, NBR), A. Screenplay (NH, BAFTA), Actor (NH), S. Actor (NH), S. Actress (NH), Foreign (NH, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, LAFC, NBR), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $4,135,750
  • Entry Rank:  #31
  • TSPDT Rank:  #214
  • The Film:  Japan didn’t submit it so the directors branch of the Academy nominated it there.  Granted it was the only time they bothered to nominate the man who might be the greatest director in film history, but whatever Academy.  Masterful version of a play that is not among my favorites of Shakespeare.  Full review here.  As seen from the picture at the top, one of just three Kurosawa films in this final 50.

#38

silence_of_the_lambs_ver2The Silence of the Lambs

  • Director:  Jonathan Demme
  • Genre:  Suspense
  • Distributor:  Orion
  • Year:  1991
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, PGA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR), Director (NH, AA, DGA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR), A. Screenplay (NH, AA, WGA, BAFTA, GG, CFC), Actor (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, CFC), Actress (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, CFC), S. Actor (BSFC, NBR), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $130,742,922
  • WW Gross:  $272,742,922
  • Entry Rank:  #33
  • TSPDT Rank:  #326
  • The Film:  Yes, there was confusion initially as to whether Hopkins was a lead of not and he won two supporting awards at the critics groups.  But everything aligned in the end for Silence to sweep the major Oscars even though it was still far from a sure thing in any category going in to the Oscars having lost everything but Actress at the Globes and Foster having won just three years earlier.  But the Academy made the right choices for a change.  Full review here.  The 4th Demme film in the Top 1000.  Often listed as the first Horror film to win Best Picture but I list it as the best Suspense film ever made.

#37

best_years_of_our_livesThe Best Years of Our Lives

  • Director:  William Wyler
  • Genre:  Drama
  • Distributor:  RKO Radio
  • Year:  1946
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC), Director (NH, AA, NYFC, NBR), A. Screenplay (NH, AA), Actor (NH, AA), Actress (NH), S. Actor (NH, NH, AA), S. Actress (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $23,650,000
  • Entry Rank:  #12
  • TSPDT Rank:  #224
  • The Film:  An odd film out, not quite as much as Paths of Glory because it wins some Nighthawks.  But it’s the only Oscar winner in my all-time Top 50 not to win the Nighthawk and at 35 spots lower on the list than the Nighthawk winner, it’s also got the biggest gap of the 9 films in this post that don’t win the Nighthawk.  But it’s a brilliant film with one of the most moving shots in film history (if you don’t know it, go see it).  Full review here.  The 9th and final William Wyler film in the Top 1000.

#36

belleLa belle et la bête

  • Director:  Jean Cocteau
  • Genre:  Fantasy  (Romance)
  • Distributor:  Lopert Films
  • Year:  1946  (OE: 1948)
  • Country:  France  (French)
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH), Director (NH), A. Screenplay (NH), Foreign (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #11
  • TSPDT Rank:  #269
  • The Film:  A visually feast for the eyes, it’s also complicated in that it got moved at the Nighthawks when I found out it actually belonged in 1948 which meant Great Expectations won the Nighthawk but Treasure of the Sierra Madre became one of the greatest #2 films ever.

#35

la_confidentialL.A. Confidential

  • Director:  Curtis Hanson
  • Genre:  Mystery  (Cop)
  • Distributor:  Warner Bros.
  • Year:  1997
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, PGA, BAFTA, CC, GG, NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR), Director (NH, DGA, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA, BAFTA, CC, GG, NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC), S. Actor (NH, BAFTA, BSFC), S. Actress (AA, SAG, BAFTA, GG), Ensemble (NH, SAG)
  • N.A. Gross:  $64,616,940
  • WW Gross:  $126,216,940
  • Entry Rank:  #32
  • TSPDT Rank:  #726
  • The Film:  That’s what happens when marketing makes the poster – the two actual stars of the film get shoved into the background and made barely visible because of “star power”.  How things have changed.  Absolutely should have won Best Picture and of the three actual leads, two starred (and won Oscars) in Best Picture winners in the following three years and the third waited an extra decade but was in two winners in a row.  One of five films in the Top 50 where the director directed only one other Top 1000 film (Trainspotting, La belle, Third Man, Wizard).  Full review here.

#34

schindlers_listSchindler’s List

  • Director:  Steven Spielberg
  • Genre:  Drama  (WWII)
  • Distributor:  Universal
  • Year:  1993
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, PGA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR), Director (NH, DGA, AA, BAFTA, GG, NSFC, BSFC, CFC), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA, BAFTA, GG, CFC), Actor (NH, AA, GG, CFC), S. Actor (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC), S. Actress (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $96,898,818
  • WW Gross:  $322,161,245
  • Entry Rank:  #31
  • TSPDT Rank:  #223
  • The Film:  The biggest Consensus Best Picture of all and it’s not really close.  It’s the only film with 10 wins (two films have 11 nominations but both are after the CC began and both lost several awards) and the only awards sweeper (AA-PGA-BAFTA-GG) to win more than three critics awards and it swept all six (one of only three films to ever sweep all six).  Since the Globes began in 1943, it’s one of only two films to win every existing Picture award in its year.  The other is below.  Full review here.  Not even Spielberg’s best film.  The highest all-time percentage of Consensus points, beating every other film by a full point and beating all other post-1946 films by 3.5 points.

#33

singin_in_the_rainSingin’ in the Rain

  • Director:  Stanley Donan  /  Gene Kelly
  • Genre:  Musical
  • Distributor:  MGM
  • Year:  1952
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, BAFTA, GG), Director (NH, DGA), Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA), Actor (GG), S. Actor (NH), S. Actress (NH, AA), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $7,200,000
  • Entry Rank:  #15
  • TSPDT Rank:  #12
  • The Film:  Not only was An American in Paris a weak Oscar winner but it likely cost the Oscar chances of this far, far superior film.  Even though it has two directors, it’s one of just three films in this final 50 where the director(s) have no other films on the list.  Pure studio movie-making joy.  Full review here.  The first of the final four films that don’t win the Nighthawk, all of them high on the 98 list which means, thankfully, we’ve never had a year with two 99 films eligible in the same year.

#32

third_manThe Third Man

  • Director:  Carol Reed
  • Genre:  Mystery  (Lit Adaptation – Greene)
  • Distributor:  Selznick Releasing Organization
  • Year:  1949  (OE: 1950)
  • Country:  England
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, BAFTA), Director (NH, DGA, AA), Screenplay (NH), S. Actor (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #11
  • TSPDT Rank:  #47
  • The Film:  Given that Reed only makes the list for one other film (Our Man in Havana – almost 900 spots lower and ironically, also by Graham Greene), it’s tempting to say Orson Welles did the rumored directing (it feels and looks more like a Welles film) but Welles just wasn’t on the set that long.  Full review here.

#31

maltese_falconThe Maltese Falcon

  • Director:  John Huston
  • Genre:  Mystery  (Detective)
  • Distributor:  Warner Bros.
  • Year:  1941
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA), Director (NH), A. Screenplay (NH, AA), Actor (NH), S. Actor (NH, NH, AA), S. Actress (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #8
  • TSPDT Rank:  #258
  • The Film:  The reason I own a fedora.  I even have a map of the scenes from the book and film up on my office wall.  John Huston ceases to just be a writer and steps into the director’s chair and scores with one of the greatest directing debuts ever and it wasn’t even the best debut of the year!  Full review here.  Huston’s 10th and final Top 1000 film, making him the 8th director to direct 10 Top 1000 films but two more will be added to the list below.

#30

metropolis_ver2Dië Maschinenmensch
(Metropolis)

  • Director:  Fritz Lang
  • Genre:  Sci-Fi  (Dystopia)
  • Distributor:  Paramount
  • Year:  1927  (OE: 1928)
  • Country:  Germany  (German)
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH), Director (NH), Screenplay (NH), S. Actor (NH), S. Actress (NH), Foreign (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #1
  • TSPDT Rank:  #60
  • The Film:  The best film not to win the Nighthawk.  And it’s got tough questions: Which is better: Metropolis or Sunrise?  What is Lang’s best film: Metropolis or M?  Surprisingly, I went with the TSPDT rank in each case.  The greatest Sci-Fi film of all-time for 50 years and still the second greatest.  Full review here.

#29

shichinin_no_samurai_ver2七人の侍
(Seven Samurai; Shichi-nin no samurai)

  • Director:  Akira Kurosawa
  • Genre:  Action  (Samurai)
  • Distributor:  Columbia
  • Year:  1954  (OE: 1956)
  • Country:  Japan  (Japanese)
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, BAFTA), Director (NH), Screenplay (NH), Actor (BAFTA, BAFTA), S. Actor (NH), Foreign (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #12
  • TSPDT Rank:  #10
  • The Film:  Long beloved on the Sight & Sound list and still very popular today (it has almost twice as many votes on the IMDb as any other pre-1980 Foreign language film) and of course the basis for multiple remakes.  Full review here.

#28

mM – Eine Stadt sucht einen Mörder
(M)

  • Director:  Fritz Lang
  • Genre:  Crime
  • Distributor:  Paramount
  • Year:  1931  (OE: 1933)
  • Country:  German  (Germany)
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH), Director (NH), Screenplay (NH), Actor (NH), Foreign (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #2
  • TSPDT Rank:  #56
  • The Film:  Lang’s best work and the film that instantly transformed Peter Lorre into an acting force to be reckoned with even if he never got his proper due when he got to Hollywood.  The 5th Lang film in the Top 1000.  Full review here.

#27

sunriseSunrise: A Song of Two Humans

  • Director:  F.W. Murnau
  • Genre:  Drama
  • Distributor:  Fox Films
  • Year:  1927  (OE: 1928)
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA), Director (NH), A. Screenplay (NH), Actor (NH), Actress (NH, AA), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #1
  • TSPDT Rank:  #8
  • The Film:  It says just about everything you need to know that this film won the “Unique and Artistic Production” at the first Oscars but it’s Wings that is considered the original Best Picture winner.  That Murnau could do this after doing Nosferatu shows what a talent we lost when he was killed in 1931.  His 4th film in the Top 1000 even though his career was truncated and some of his films are lost.  Full review here.

#26

star_wars_ver4Star Wars
(Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope)

  • Director:  George Lucas
  • Genre:  Sci-Fi  (Franchise: Star Wars)
  • Distributor:  20th Century-Fox
  • Year:  1977
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, LAFC), Director (NH, DGA, AA, GG), Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA), S. Actor (NH, NH, AA, GG), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $460,998,507
  • WW Gross:  $775,398,007
  • Entry Rank:  #20
  • TSPDT Rank:  #120
  • The Film:  What could I possibly say about this film that I haven’t already?  The first film I ever saw, the film I have seen more than any other (by a very long way) and my favorite film of all-time.  Full review here.

#25

modern_timesModern Times

  • Director:  Charlie Chaplin
  • Genre:  Comedy  (Satire)
  • Distributor:  United Artists
  • Year:  1936
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH), Director (NH), Screenplay (NH), Actor (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #1
  • TSPDT Rank:  #51
  • The Film:  Chaplin’s best film and the third best of the entire 1930s, a great decade for film and it earned a whopping zero Oscar noms.  Full review here.  His 5th Top 1000 film.

#24

princess_brideThe Princess Bride

  • Director:  Rob Reiner
  • Genre:  Fantasy  (Romantic)
  • Distributor:  20th Century-Fox
  • Year:  1987
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH), Director (NH), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA), S. Actor (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $30,857,814
  • Entry Rank:  #20
  • TSPDT Rank:  #798
  • The Film:  Reiner ends up with more Top 1000 films than Chaplin (6), all of them among his first seven films and it’s been very much downhill since sadly.  From here on, everything is a 99, the very highest ranking.  This film, of course, is a bit of everything (except a Musical).  Full review here.

#23

streetcar_named_desireA Streetcar Named Desire

  • Director:  Elia Kazan
  • Genre:  Drama  (Play Adaptation – Williams)
  • Distributor:  Warner Bros.
  • Year:  1951
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC), Director (NH, DGA, AA, NYFC), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA), Actor (NH, AA), Actress (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC), S. Actor (NH, AA), S. Actress (NH, AA, GG), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $8,000,000
  • Entry Rank:  #8
  • TSPDT Rank:  #676
  • The Film:  One of the greatest showcases of acting ever put on film and the best performance in the film, of course, didn’t win the Oscar because Academy voters weren’t ready for Brando yet.  Full review here.  Kazan’s 7th Top 1000 film.

#22

bridge_on_the_river_kwaiThe Bridge on the River Kwai

  • Director:  David Lean
  • Genre:  War  (WWII)
  • Distributor:  Columbia
  • Year:  1957
  • Country:  England  /  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, NBR), Director (NH, DGA, AA, GG, NYFC, NBR), A. Screenplay (NH, AA), Actor (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, NBR), S. Actor (NH, NH, AA, NBR), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $33,300,000
  • Entry Rank:  #9
  • TSPDT Rank:  #413
  • The Film:  Lean’s film was a massive crowd-pleaser and a huge Oscar film (winning 7 of 8 awards) and was the only film prior to Schindler’s List to win every existing Best Picture award.  Full review here.

#21

lord_of_the_rings_the_fellowship_of_the_ring_ver3The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

  • Director:  Peter Jackson
  • Genre:  Fantasy  (Franchise: Middle-Earth)
  • Distributor:  New Line
  • Year:  2001
  • Country:  New Zealand
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, PGA, AA, BAFTA, CC, GG), Director (NH, DGA, AA, BAFTA, CC, GG), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA, BAFTA), Actor (BAFTA), S. Actor (NH, NH, SAG, AA), S. Actress (NH, NBR), Ensemble (NH, SAG)
  • N.A. Gross:  $316,115,420
  • WW Gross:  $898,094,742
  • Entry Rank:  #20
  • TSPDT Rank:  #755
  • The Film:  New levels of what a film could do, both in terms of creating a world that was so realistic and so different as well as what a large ensemble of actors could do on screen when also dealing with the massive epic level of special effects.  Every moment in it paid off as well as I ever could have dreamed.  Full review here.

#20

casablancaCasablanca

  • Director:  Michael Curtiz
  • Genre:  Drama  (Romance)
  • Distributor:  Warner Bros.
  • Year:  1942  (OE: 1943)
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA), Director (NH, AA), A. Screenplay (NH, AA), Actor (NH, AA), Actress (NH), S. Actor (NH, AA), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #4
  • TSPDT Rank:  #36
  • The Film:  The ultimate triumph of the studio system as none of the films above this are true products of the system and the way it used cast and crew to make films.  The ultimate Romance with the romance itself not actually coming true at the end.  Full review here.

#19

dr_strangeloveDr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

  • Director:  Stanley Kubrick
  • Genre:  Comedy  (Black)
  • Distributor:  Columbia
  • Year:  1964
  • Country:  U.S.  /  England
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, BAFTA), Director (NH, DGA, AA, NYFC), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA), Actor (NH, NH, AA, BAFTA, BAFTA), S. Actor (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $9,164,370
  • Entry Rank:  #11
  • TSPDT Rank:  #46
  • The Film:  The most subversive film nominated by the Academy up to that point and the first time that the Academy really saw the brilliance of Stanley Kubrick.  Full review here.  Kubrick’s 10th film in the Top 1000 which is amazing since he only directed 13.

#18

goodfellasGoodFellas

  • Director:  Martin Scorsese
  • Genre:  Crime  (Gangster – True Story)
  • Distributor:  Warner Bros.
  • Year:  1990
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, PGA, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC), Director (NH, DGA, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA, BAFTA, GG, CFC), Actor (NH, NH, BAFTA, NYFC), S. Actor (NH, AA, GG, LAFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR), S. Actress (NH, AA, GG, LAFC, CFC), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $46,909,721
  • Entry Rank:  #16
  • TSPDT Rank:  #68
  • The Film:  The film that made me understood as a teenager the divided between the critics and the audiences with the money and awards groups going for Dances.  But it is also the only film aside from Shawshank with over one million votes at the IMDb that wasn’t a big box office hit.  The first film to win 6 Best Picture awards and the highest Consensus % for Picture since 1947.  One of four post-1950 films to break 18% at the Consensus awards for total point percentage and all four are in this final post (Schindler’s List, L.A. Confidential, Silence of the Lambs).  Full review here.  Marty’s 12th and final film on the list, one of only six directors with a dozen films on the list (Allen, Kurosawa, Bergman, Spielberg, Hitchcock).

#17

lord_of_the_rings_the_return_of_the_king_ver7The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King

  • Director:  Peter Jackson
  • Genre:  Fantasy  (Franchise – Middle-Earth)
  • Distributor:  New Line
  • Year:  2001
  • Country:  New Zealand
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, PGA, BAFTA, CC, GG, NYFC, CFC), Director (NH, DGA, AA, BAFTA, CC, GG, LAFC, CC), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA, BAFTA), Actor (NH, NH), S. Actor (NH, NH, BAFTA), S. Actress (NH), Ensemble (NH, SAG, CC, NBR)
  • N.A. Gross:  $378,251,207
  • WW Gross:  $1,146,436,214
  • Entry Rank:  #17
  • TSPDT Rank:  #900
  • The Film:  Jackson closes out the trilogy in magnificent style without a single mis-step.  With a magnificent ensemble, it crushes the record for most acting points with 55 (no other film has more than 44) and the most total points with 171 (Wizard with 168 and Fellowship with 164 are the only other ones above 143).  Emotional closure achieved: “We set out to save the Shire, Sam.  And it has been saved.  But not for me.”  Full review here.

#16

crouching_tiger_hidden_dragon_ver3臥虎藏龍
(Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; Wo hu cang long)

  • Director:  Ang Lee
  • Genre:  Action  (Martial Arts)
  • Distributor:  Sony Pictures Classics
  • Year:  2000
  • Country:  Taiwan  (Chinese)
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, PGA, BAFTA, CC, LAFC), Director (NH, DGA, AA, BAFTA, GG), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA, BAFTA), Actor (NH), Actress (NH, BAFTA), S. Actress (NH, BAFTA), Foreign (NH, AA, BAFTA, CC, GG, BSFC, CFC, NBR), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $128,078,872
  • WW Gross:  $213,525,736
  • Entry Rank:  #16
  • TSPDT Rank:  #391
  • The Film:  Ang Lee finds the perfect balance between the West and the East and makes a film that perfectly combines romance with action.  The first Foreign film to ever gross over $100 million in the U.S..  Full review here.  Ang Lee’s 7th film on the list.

#15

raiders_of_the_lost_ark_ver1Raiders of the Lost Ark
(Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark)

  • Director:  Steven Spielberg
  • Genre:  Fantasy
  • Distributor:  Paramount
  • Year:  1981
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, BAFTA), Director (NH, DGA, AA, GG, BSFC), Screenplay (NH, WGA), Actor (NH), Actress (NH), S. Actor (BAFTA), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $248,159,971
  • WW Gross:  $389,925,971
  • Entry Rank:  #15
  • TSPDT Rank:  #193
  • The Film:  Yes, Spielberg’s best film has Nazis but isn’t that serious about it.  His 16th film on the list, placing him only behind Bergman and Allen (and Spielberg is well suited for the updates).  Following in the footsteps of Star Wars in taking a genre film and making it truly brilliant.  Full review here.

#14

bonnie_and_clydeBonnie and Clyde

  • Director:  Arthur Penn
  • Genre:  Crime  (True Crime)
  • Distributor:  Warner Bros.
  • Year:  1967
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG), Director (NH, AA, DGA, GG), Screenplay (NH, WGA, WGA, AA, GG, NYFC, NSFC), Actor (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG), Actress (NH, AA, GG), S. Actor (NH, NH, AA, AA, GG, NSFC), S. Actress (NH, AA), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $50,700,000
  • Entry Rank:  #11
  • TSPDT Rank:  #243
  • The Film:  The film that showed that adult cinema was ready for the next step and one of the main focuses for one of the greatest books on film ever written.  Just remember that in spite of winning two critics awards and two different WGA Awards it lost Screenplay at the Oscars to Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner.  Full review here.  One of just three films in the Top 50 where the director has no other Top 1000 films.

#13

cries_and_whispersViskningar och rop
(Cries and Whispers)

  • Director:  Ingmar Bergman
  • Genre:  Drama
  • Distributor:  New World Pictures
  • Year:  1972  (OE: 1973)
  • Country:  Sweden  (Swedish)
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, NYFC), Director (NH, AA, NYFC, NBR), Screenplay (NH, AA, NYFC, NSFC), Actress (NH, NH, NYFC), S. Actor (NH), S. Actress (NH, NH, BAFTA), Foreign (NH, GG, NBR), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #12
  • TSPDT Rank:  #150
  • The Film:  From no films for Penn to Bergman’s 16th film and it’s not even his best film.  If nothing else, the Academy finally gave Bergman nominations for Picture, Director and Screenplay, something that Fellini, Kurosawa and Truffaut never achieved.  Full review here.  The answer to the trivia question no one has ever asked of how to connect Roger Corman, Ingmar Bergman, Stan Lee and Rupert Murdoch in one step is that New World Pictures, founded by Corman in 1970, released this film in the U.S. in 1973, later bought Marvel in 1986 and was eventually purchased by Murdoch in 1997.

#12

lawrence_of_arabiaLawrence of Arabia

  • Director:  David Lean
  • Genre:  Drama  (Epic)
  • Distributor:  Columbia
  • Year:  1962
  • Country:  England
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG), Director (NH, DGA, AA, GG, NBR), A. Screenplay (NH, AA), Actor (NH, AA, BAFTA, BAFTA, GG, GG), S. Actor (NH, AA, GG), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $45,306,425
  • Entry Rank:    #10
  • TSPDT Rank:  #32
  • The Film:  I can’t fathom how the Globes thought Anthony Quinn was a lead but Omar Sharif was not.  A brilliant epic that you should get a chance to see on the big screen if you ever can in spite of the almost four hour length.  Full review here.  Lean’s 9th film on the list.

#11

west_side_storyWest Side Story

  • Director:  Robert Wise  /  Jerome Robbins
  • Genre:  Musical  (Shakespeare – Tragedy)
  • Distributor:  United Artists
  • Year:  1961
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC), Director (NH, DGA, AA, GG), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA), Actor (GG), S. Actor (NH, AA, GG), S. Actress (NH, AA, GG), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $44,055,492
  • Entry Rank:  #9
  • TSPDT Rank:  #320
  • The Film:  Like Singin’ in the Rain, one of just three films in this Top 50 in which the director has no other Top 1000 films and they are both musicals with multiple directors.  To me, on the shortlist with Les Miserables and Hamilton for greatest stage musical (and yes, I have seen them all on stage).  Full review here.

#10

Citizen Kane

  • Director:  Orson Welles
  • Genre:  1941
  • Distributor:  RKO Radio
  • Year:  1941
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, NYFC, NBR), Director (NH, AA), Screenplay (NH, AA), Actor (NH, AA), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #3
  • TSPDT Rank:  #1
  • The Film:  The final example of back-to-back films from the same director, the 4th and 5th Welles films on the list.  Of course, obviously, most people would reverse these two.  Still stands the test of time but if you really want to feel its cinematic power, watch a bunch of 30s films then watch this and see the difference.  Full review here.

#9

touch_of_evilTouch of Evil

  • Director:  Orson Welles
  • Genre:  Mystery  (Cop)
  • Distributor:  Universal
  • Year:  1958
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH), Director (NH), A. Screenplay (NH), Actor (NH), S. Actress (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $2,237,659
  • Entry Rank:  #6
  • TSPDT Rank:  #31
  • The Film:  Completely ignored at the time, re-edited by the studio (though unlike what you heard in Ed Wood, Universal didn’t make him cast Heston – in fact Heston is a major reason Welles was directing the film) but later finally acknowledged as an absolute classic and to my mind, actually the best of Welles’ work.  Full review here.

#8

chinatownChinatown

  • Director:  John Huston
  • Genre:  Mystery  (Detective)
  • Distributor:  Paramount
  • Year:  1974
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG), Director (NH, DGA, AA, BAFTA, GG), Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA, BAFTA, GG), Actor (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, NSFC), Actress (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG), S. Actor (NH, BAFTA, GG), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $29,200,000
  • Entry Rank:  #8
  • TSPDT Rank:  #55
  • The Film:  While most of the major studios have had their best film, not only is this not Paramount’s best film (or even second best), it’s not even the best from the first half of the 70s.  The 8th Polanski film on the list and the best film from the year I was born which gives it special meaning (plus I lived in the LA suburbs when I first saw it).  Full review here.  By the way, how strange was it for Nicholson to lose the Oscar, especially to a tv actor like Art Carney?  Absolutely unprecedented.  Even putting aside the BAFTA (which came after the Oscar in those days), Nicholson was just the second actor to win the Globe and NYFC and lose the Oscar (after Kirk Douglas in 1956).  He was only the third actor to win the NYFC and NSFC and lose the Oscar, one of whom was Jon Voight in 1969 (with Hoffman pulling votes) and the other Marlon Brando in 1973 (who had won the year before).  Today, Nicholson is still one of only two actors to win the Globes, NYFC and NSFC and not win the Oscar (Bob Hoskins in 1986).

#7

godfather_ver1The Godfather

  • Director:  Francis Ford Coppola
  • Genre:  Crime  (Gangster)
  • Distributor:  Paramount
  • Year:  1972
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, GG), Director (NH, DGA, AA, GG), A. Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA, GG), Actor (NH, AA, BAFTA, GG, GG, NSFC), S. Actor (NH, NH, NH, NH, AA, AA, AA, BAFTA, GG, NYFC, NBR), S. Actress (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $136,381,073
  • WW Gross:  $250,341,816
  • Entry Rank:  #7
  • TSPDT Rank:  #7
  • The Film:  There’s a good case to be made that the film canon should begin with The Godfather.  First, it won the Oscar, the only film in my all-time Top 10 to do that.  Second, it also was the biggest box office film of the year.  In fact, based on Variety’s rentals, it was the biggest film of all-time and held that for three years, beating out Gone with the Wind and staying at #1 over The Exorcist.  Not a lot of films win the Oscar and the box office (just 9 films in the 45 years before it and only 6 in the 50 years since).  But The Godfather is also the critical champ.  It’s one of only 7 films to win the Oscar and be the top ranked film for the year at TSPDT and it’s the only one of those to be a true box office smash.  It’s also at the top for the IMDb voters.  No film earlier than this one earns even half as many votes at the IMDb and it takes until 1994 to find one with more votes.  It also has the highest rating for the year at the IMDb (and second highest all-time).  More than any other film in history, it hits the top of critical, commercial and industry appeal.  Full review here.

#6

TSSHHE-2Det sjunde inseglet
(The Seventh Seal)

  • Director:  Ingmar Bergman
  • Genre:  Drama  (Religious)
  • Distributor:  Janus Films
  • Year:  1957  (OE: 1959)
  • Country:  Sweden  (Swedish)
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH), Director (NH), A. Screenplay (NH), Actor (NH), S. Actor (NH), S. Actress (NH), Foreign (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #6
  • TSPDT Rank:  #73
  • The Film:  Bergman’s ultimate triumph of the nature of God, a game between life and death (literally) and a world in decay versus the desire to try and do good.  Full review here.  Bergman joins Woody Allen at the top with 17 films on the list.

#5

51qRemImZ7L._AC_La grande illusion
(The Grand Illusion)

  • Director:  Jean Renoir
  • Genre:  War  (WWI)
  • Distributor:  RAC
  • Year:  1937  (OE: 1938)
  • Country:  France  (French)
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA), Director (NH), Screenplay (NH), Actor (NH), S. Actor (NH), Foreign (NH, NYFC, NBR), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #1
  • TSPDT Rank:  #44
  • The Film:  A picture so clearly brilliant that it was the only Foreign language film to earn a Best Picture nomination at the Oscars in the first 40 years they were in existence.  Renoir’s 4th film is a poetic look at the nature and cost of war.  Full review here.

#4

download羅生門
(Rashomon)

  • Director:  Akira Kurosawa
  • Genre:  Drama
  • Distributor:  RKO Radio
  • Year:  1950  (OE: 1952)
  • Country:  Japan  (Japanese)
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, BAFTA), Director (NH, DGA, NBR), A. Screenplay (NH), S. Actor (NH), Foreign (NH, AA, NBR), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #4
  • TSPDT Rank:  #21
  • The Film:  The 14th and final Kurosawa film on the list is sometimes misunderstood in that there isn’t a clear answer – there is only the memory of what happened.  The film that made Kurosawa internationally renowned.  Full review here.

#3

sbSunset Blvd.
(Sunset Boulevard)

  • Director:  Billy Wilder
  • Genre:  Drama  (Tragedy)
  • Distributor:  Paramount
  • Year:  1950
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA, GG, NBR), Director (NH, DGA, AA, GG), Screenplay (NH, WGA, AA, GG), Actor (NH, AA), Actress (NH, AA, GG, NBR), S. Actor (NH, AA, GG), S. Actress (NH, AA), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #3
  • TSPDT Rank:  #33
  • The Film:  Yes, it has finally fallen off the very top of my list but don’t think for a second that means I’ve changed my opinion about how brilliant this is at a look at how Hollywood works.  It’s just that the other two films have moved slightly up.  Wilder becomes the final director to land 10 films on the list.  Full review here.  The last of the three Paramount films in the Top 10 and the studio is a very important part of the film.

#2

childrenLes enfants du paradis
(Children of Paradise)

  • Director:  Marcel Carne
  • Genre:  Drama
  • Distributor:  Pathe-Cinema
  • Year:  1945  (OE: 1946)
  • Country:  France  (French)
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH), Director (NH), Screenplay (NH, AA), Actor (NH), S. Actor (NH), S. Actress (NH), Foreign (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • Entry Rank:  #2
  • TSPDT Rank:  #62
  • The Film:  Yes, it’s a three hour long French film but if you hesitate for one second over the idea of watching this film then you have no business reading this list in the first place.  Just the 3rd Carne film on the list.  Full review here.

#1

wizard_of_oz_ver9The Wizard of Oz

  • Director:  Victor Fleming
  • Genre:  Kids  (Musical)
  • Distributor:  MGM
  • Year:  1939
  • Country:  U.S.
  • Major Awards:  Picture (NH, AA), Director (NH), A. Screenplay (NH), Actress (NH), S. Actor (NH, NH), S. Actress (NH), Ensemble (NH)
  • N.A. Gross:  $24,668,669
  • Entry Rank:  #1
  • TSPDT Rank:  #104
  • The Film:  With the songs, it covers the genre that The Princess Bride misses though it lacks that film’s romance.  Still, it’s a bit of everything and the pure magic of that moment when everything turns to color is a reminder of why movies are here in the first place.  It feels like this film has been moving towards this spot my whole life.  Full review here.  Ironic that this isn’t Fleming’s only Top 1000 film because both his film on the list (Gone with the Wind) are much more products of their producers (Selznick for Gone, Mervyn LeRoy here) than their director.