The 2010’s

A Decade in Review

With best of the decade lists popping up all over the place and me needing a quick post that could go up between awards notes updates, I decided to throw this together.  It’s true that I’m missing a lot of major films from this year, but hey, these kind of lists change all the time anyway.  So think of this as a rough draft for history.  It’s got a minimum of notes or commentary because of time constraints and because I feel it mostly speaks for itself.  Most of it shouldn’t be surprising given my Nighthawk winners in previous years.

Feel free to post any of your own best of decade lists in the comments field if you want.  All are welcome and I expect no one to agree with my lists anyway.

Films in red won the Oscar.  Films in blue earned Oscar noms.  In the Actor and Actress, the red and blue in genre are for the Globes.  If I list a “Worst Oscar Winner”, I thought the winner was a bad choice.  If I list the “Weakest Oscar Winner” it means that all the Oscar winners in the decade were at least pretty good choices.

The Ten Best Films:

  1. La La Land
  2. Lincoln
  3. Gravity
  4. Inception
  5. Birdman
  6. Lady Bird
  7. Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood
  8. Dunkirk
  9. Carol
  10. The Favourite

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A Century of Film


Visual Effects

Visual Effects might seem like a new thing, stemming first from 2001 and then from Star Wars with increasingly developed technology leading to amazing new things on-screen.  But they have actually been there from the start.  A Trip to the Moon, the first great film ever made, back in 1902, used brilliant Visual Effects to show its incredible trip. (more…)

A Century of Film


Sci-Fi


The Genre

Science Fiction on film goes back to the dawn of narrative feature film storytelling.  The first great film, A Trip to the Moon, was a Sci-Fi film complete with state of the art special effects.  But not everyone could be George Méliès and not very many people tried.  I’ve only seen three Sci-Fi films made before the advent of sound (and there’s not much out there at feature length that I haven’t seen) and all of them were foreign (A Trip to Mars, Aelita: Queen of Mars, Metropolis).

The genre mostly lay dormant in the 1930’s and 1940’s.  If you click on those links, the vast majority of what is listed there (and even what is listed there isn’t very long) is either a serial (which I don’t count) or something I list as another genre (often Horror).  I’ve seen just 11 films from those two decades which I count (and none after 1941).  Then came the 50’s. (more…)

So, this is a very different list than the one that will be appearing in the next post as you will already know from the Actress list.  In fact, rather than repeat the entire introduction from that post, I will just say that you should click on that link and read that intro first.  But the key to this list is that this is the favorites list, not the best, so remember that for all the bits about the actor. (more…)

Since the character of Garrett doesn’t even exist in the novel, this scene clearly isn’t in the novel.

My Top 10

  1. Terms of Endearment
  2. Betrayal
  3. Educating Rita
  4. The Right Stuff
  5. The Year of Living Dangerously
  6. The Dresser
  7. Reuben Reuben
  8. Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi

note:  That’s it.  Just eight films.  And there’s really a big drop-off after the Top 5.  Actually, there’s really kind of a drop-off after the Top 3.

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A Century of Film
Original Score

It’s tricky to even call this category Original Score since the only group that actually holds true to that is the Oscars and even they have had a lot of different categories over the years.  Nonetheless, I have tried to hold true to that, even though at times I disagree with the Academy’s distinction of how much pre-existing music can dilute that score. (more…)

A Century of Film

 

20th Century-Fox

 

The Studio

The studio originally began as Fox.  It began with William Fox and its start came in 1904.  “Fox’s initiation into the movie business came in 1904 when he purchased from J. Stuart Blackton of the Vitagraph Company the Brooklyn nickelodeon (which, given the five-cent admission fee, was then the generic name for movie theaters).  The location was 200 Broadway, and the price was $1,600.  This was an inauspicious beginning, for, indeed, Fox had been swindled.  Prior to the sale, Blackton hired customers to fill the 146-seat house.  Once the deal was closed and Fox’s name appeared on the lease, the day’s admissions totaled two.”  (The Fox That Got Away: The Last Days of the Zanuck Dynasty at Twentieth Century-Fox, Stephen M. Silverman, p 30) (more…)