I would say, "this is my childhood", but really, this extends far, far beyond my childhood.

I would say, “this is my childhood”, but really, this extends far, far beyond my childhood.  You should see my pantry.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category (or Globe, in the Globes section).  Films in blue were nominated.  Films with an asterisk (*) were Consensus nominees (a scale I put together based on the various awards) while those with a double asterisk (**) were the Consensus winners.

I’m listing the top 10 in the categories but only the top 5 earn Nighthawk nominations.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. Star Wars
  2. Annie Hall
  3. Aguirre the Wrath of God
  4. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  5. King Lear
  6. That Obscure Object of Desire
  7. Jacob the Liar
  8. The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  9. Dersu Uzala
  10. The Goodbye Girl

Analysis:  The original Nighthawk Best Picture winner, Star Wars was the first film I ever saw and the film that I have seen the most (by a long, long, long way).  But ever since I finally saw Annie Hall (in college), it has continued to inch its way closer and closer.  It’ll never catch Star Wars, but it’s almost a tie.  It’s the best 2nd place film since 1957 and there hasn’t been a better one since.  This is the sixth time that I give the same numerical rating to both my #1 and #2 films, but the only time previously where the #1 and #2 films are this good is 1928 (Sunrise and Metropolis).
Only the first six films are ****, making this the weakest Top 10 in five years.  It’s even worse when you consider that four of these films are from other years, just getting a U.S. release.  Dersu Uzala is the weakest film to make a Top 10 since 1970 and there won’t ever again be a film this weak to make the Top 10.
One thing to note – King Lear was originally listed in 1975 and was in fact my under-appreciated film of that year.  But, I have used the English language title and moved it to this year because of its listing in oscars.org.

vintage-behind-the-scenes-star-wars-costumes

  • Best Director
  1. George Lucas  (Star Wars)  *
  2. Woody Allen  (Annie Hall)  **
  3. Werner Herzog  (Aguirre the Wrath of God)
  4. Steven Spielberg  (Close Encounters of the Third Kind)  *
  5. Grigori Kozintsev  (King Lear)
  6. Luis Buñuel  (That Obscure Object of Desire)  *
  7. Akira Kurosawa  (Dersu Uzala)
  8. Frank Beyer  (Jacob the Liar)
  9. Werner Herzog  (Heart of Glass)
  10. Victor Erice  (The Spirit of the Beehive)

Analysis:  These are the only nominations for Herzog, Kozintsev and Lucas, the first for Allen and the second for Spielberg.  The latter two, of course, will eventually go quite high on the nominations list, though they will rarely get nominated in the same year again.

  • Best Adapted Screenplay:
  1. That Obscure Object of Desire
  2. King Lear
  3. Equus  *
  4. Oh God!  *
  5. The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  6. The Marquise de O
  7. Dersu Uzala

Analysis:  This is Luis Buñuel’s sixth writing nomination and second Nighthawk Award (the first was in Original).  This is also his final nomination and he finishes with 320 points and a tie for sixth place.
I decided when I last watched Julia that the script is too flawed for me to nominate it, even though it won the Oscar, WGA, BAFTA and Consensus.  It is, quite frankly, not a good year for this category.
That Obscure Object of Desire is the weakest winner in this category since 1932.  This is the weakest Top 5 in this category since 1931.
The Oscar winner was Julia, which doesn’t even make my list, let alone the Top 5 (the first time for either for an Oscar winner in this category since 1964).
I have read three of the original sources – King Lear, Equus and Pooh.

  • Best Original Screenplay:
  1. Annie Hall  **
  2. Star Wars  *
  3. Close Encounters of the Third Kind  *
  4. Aguirre the Wrath of God
  5. Black and White in Color
  6. The Goodbye Girl  *
  7. Jacob the Liar
  8. Three Women
  9. The Late Show  *
  10. Slap Shot

Analysis:  Close Encounters becomes only the second of three Original scripts to earn WGA, Globe and BAFTA noms but fail to earn an Oscar nom.  Why?  Because they had to nominate the triteness that is The Turning Point.
Woody Allen earns his sixth writing nomination and his first win.  This is the start of his total dominance and the first of four straight Nighthawk wins for him.  He’s only at 280 points here and in tenth place but by the time his streak is done he will be in fourth place.
Annie Hall crushes everything at the Consensus.  It sets new highs with 7 nominations (not matched again until 1982, not passed until 1994 and not even matched in Adapted until 1995), 6 wins, because it lost the Globe to The Goodbye Girl and 504 points (neither matched until Pulp Fiction surpasses both in 1994).  As much as I love Star Wars, and it is more than you could know, I can’t deny that Annie Hall has one of the greatest scripts ever written.
Even though this Top 5 is better than the two previous years, the two writing categories are the weakest combined in seven years.
In spite of Star Wars and Annie Hall, the Oscar score for this category is a 71.0, which is actually the lowest in seven years.

  • Best Actor:
  1. Klaus Kinski  (Aguirre the Wrath of God)
  2. Richard Burton  (Equus)  *
  3. Woody Allen  (Annie Hall)  *
  4. Richard Dreyfuss  (The Goodbye Girl)  **
  5. Juri Jarvet  (King Lear)
  6. Richard Dreyfuss  (Close Encounters of the Third Kind)
  7. John Travolta  (Saturday Night Fever)  *
  8. Paul Newman  (Slap Shot)
  9. Fernando Rey  (That Obscure Object of Desire)
  10. Marcello Mastroianni  (A Special Day)

Analysis:  Burton won the Globe yet finishes fourth in the Consensus, the lowest for a Globe Drama winner in eight years.
These are the only nominations for both Dreyfuss (a little surprising) and Jarvet.  Kinski earns his first and Allen his second.  Burton, on the other hand, is earning his sixth.
This is the best Top 5 in three years and the second best since 1963.  But, since neither Kinski nor Jarvet earned nominations, the Oscar score is an 81.6, which sounds high, but is the lowest in this category since 1969.

  • Best Actress
  1. Diane Keaton  (Annie Hall)  **
  2. Jane Fonda  (Julia)  *
  3. Marsha Mason  (The Goodbye Girl)  *
  4. Shirley MacLaine  (The Turning Point)
  5. Diane Keaton  (Looking for Mr. Goodbar)  **
  6. Anne Bancroft  (The Turning Point)  *
  7. Shelley Duvall  (Three Women)  *
  8. Gena Rowlands  (Opening Night)
  9. Teresa Wright  (Roseland)
  10. Liza Minnelli  (New York New York)

Analysis:  Diane Keaton dominates as no one before her, winning three critics awards, the Oscar, Globe and the BAFTA.  Both of Keaton’s performances win the Consensus because I combine performances because of the way Critics give the awards.  Also, because Keaton earns two nominations, Bancroft actually earns a Nighthawk nomination.
This is the first nomination for Mason, the second and third for Keaton, the third for Fonda and the fourth for Bancroft and MacLaine.
Because of how I do the Oscar points (Keaton can’t count twice because she can’t earn two nominations), the Oscar score is 100 (they nominated the five best performances they could), joining 1951 and 1972 for the third time this category has earned a perfect score.

  • Best Supporting Actor:
  1. Alec Guinness  (Star Wars)  *
  2. Jason Robards  (Julia)  **
  3. Tony Roberts  (Annie Hall)
  4. Peter Firth  (Equus)  *
  5. Peter Cushing  (Star Wars)
  6. James Earl Jones  (Star Wars)
  7. Regimantas Adomaitis  (King Lear)
  8. George Burns  (Oh God!)
  9. Colin Blakely  (Equus)
  10. Maximillian Schell  (Julia)  *

Analysis:  Jason Robards, the only person to win back-to-back Supporting Actor Oscars also wins back-to-back Consensus Awards without winning any of the same awards as the year before except the Oscar.  The only critics award he wins this time is the LAFC (didn’t exist the year before) and he wins the BAFTA which he lost the year before.
These are the only nominations for Cushing, Firth and Roberts.  Robards earns his third.  Guinness, on the other hand, my favorite actor of all-time, is earning his ninth nomination and his second win.  This puts him at 360 points and fourth place all-time.
There are probably those who would object to Jones making the list, as it is a voice performance only.  But to do that voice performance when the physical performance was already complete, aside from the magnificence of the voice performance itself means I can’t ignore it.
This is the best Top 5 in five years.  But, with only three nominees in the Top 5 and one not making the Top 10 (Mikhail Baryshnikov in The Turning Point is my #11), the score is a 74.3, the lowest in this category in seven years.

  • juliaBest Supporting Actress:
  1. Vanessa Redgrave  (Julia)  **
  2. Melinda Dillon  (Close Encounters of the Third Kind)
  3. Sissy Spacek  (Three Women)  *
  4. Eileen Atkins  (Equus)
  5. Quinn Cummings  (The Goodbye Girl)  *
  6. Jenny Agutter  (Equus)
  7. Lily Tomlin  (The Late Show)
  8. Joan Plowright  (Equus)

Analysis:  Vanessa Redgrave, my easy winner, becomes the first person in this category to win the Oscar and the Globe since 1969 and only the second ever to win the Oscar, Globe and a critics award.
These are the only nominations for Atkins and Cummings.  It’s the first nomination for Dillon and the third for Spacek and Redgrave.
Redgrave is the easy winner but she’s the weakest winner in five years.  This is the weakest Top 5 in five years.  Also, with only three nominees making my list (the other two – Leslie Browne in The Turning Point and Tuesday Weld in Looking for Mr. Goodbar I don’t even think good enough to put on the list), the score is only 62.5, the lowest since 1959.

  • Best Editing:
  1. Star Wars
  2. Annie Hall
  3. Aguirre the Wrath of God
  4. That Obscure Object of Desire
  5. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  6. King Lear
  7. The Spirit of the Beehive
  8. Smokey and the Bandit
  9. The Goodbye Girl
  10. Equus

Analysis:  Really, Academy?  The editing in The Turning Point was better than that of Annie Hall?  You want a do-over on that one?

  • Best Cinematography:
  1. Star Wars
  2. Close Encounters of the Third Kind  *
  3. Aguirre the Wrath of God  *
  4. King Lear
  5. Dersu Uzala
  6. Annie Hall
  7. Heart of Glass
  8. 1900
  9. That Obscure Object of Desire
  10. Looking for Mr. Goodbar  *

Analysis:  Gilbert Taylor wins a Nighthawk in his third nomination.  Vilmos Zsigmond earns his third (and actually won the Oscar) and will win the next year.  But it’s Asakazu Nakai, earning his sixth nomination (all with Kurosawa) who is the highest person on the points list here, moving up to 175 points and a tie for fourth place.
Julia was actually the Consensus winner, winning the LAFC and BAFTA and earning an Oscar nom.  Just remember that The Turning Point was nominated for an Oscar but not Star Wars.

  • Best Original Score:
  1. Star Wars
  2. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  3. Aguirre the Wrath of God
  4. King Lear
  5. 1900
  6. Heart of Glass
  7. A Bridge Too Far
  8. Black and White in Color
  9. Three Women
  10. Julia

Analysis:  It’s almost all about John Williams, as he earns his second win and comes in first and second place (the first composer to take the top two spots in the same year), moving into the Top 10 with 150 points.  The reason it’s not all about him is that Ennio Morricone earns his sixth nomination (for 1900) and moves up to 225 points and a tie for fifth place.  You also can’t ignore a great composer like Shostakovich, who did the great music in King Lear.
This is the best Top 5 in eight years.  Star Wars is the single best score to-date (and definitely one of the Top 5 of all-time).  But, the Academy score is still only a 50, the lowest in four years.

  • Best Sound:
  1. Star Wars
  2. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  3. King Lear
  4. Aguirre the Wrath of God
  5. A Bridge Too Far
  6. Dersu Uzala
  7. Saturday Night Fever
  8. Sorcerer
  9. New York New York
  10. Cross of Iron

Analysis:  There is a really big gap between the top two and the rest of this list.  But Star Wars wins this easily, with the amazing things that film does with sound.

  • iv-cantinaBest Art Direction:
  1. Star Wars
  2. King Lear
  3. Annie Hall
  4. Saturday Night Fever
  5. Dersu Uzala
  6. Joseph Andrews
  7. Julia
  8. New York New York
  9. The Marquise de O
  10. Jabberwocky

Analysis:  Star Wars is the easy winner here – not only because of its visionary sets, but also because King Lear is the weakest #2 in seven years.  The Top 5 is also the weakest in seven years.

  • Best Visual Effects
  1. Star Wars
  2. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  3. Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger
  4. A Bridge Too Far

Analysis:  Star Wars has the best Visual Effects of any film to this date, with Close Encounters easily being the best 2nd place to-date.  In fact, Close Encounters would be the second best winner to date behind only 2001 – it just has the bad luck to be in the same year as Star Wars.  Those two films alone would be enough to make this the best Top 5 in this category to-date.

  • Best Sound Editing
  1. Star Wars
  2. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  3. A Bridge Too Far
  4. Cross of Iron
  5. Sorcerer
  6. Aguirre the Wrath of God
  7. The Spy Who Loved Me

Analysis:  Close Encounters is also the best #2 here, by a ways.  There won’t be another #2 even close until 1983.  This is the second best Top 5 to-date, behind only 1968.

  • iv-vader-openingBest Costume Design:
  1. Star Wars
  2. Aguirre the Wrath of God
  3. King Lear
  4. Dersu Uzala
  5. Joseph Andrews
  6. 1900
  7. The Marquise de O
  8. Let Joy Reign Supreme
  9. Jabberwocky
  10. Julia

Analysis:  Aside from Star Wars, they really dropped the ball on this one.  The Academy earns a score of 34.4, the worst in this category since 1958 and the third worst of all-time.

  • iv-cantina-creatures-1536x864-201224740128Best Makeup
  1. Star Wars
  2. King Lear
  3. Jabberwocky
  4. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  5. Aguirre the Wrath of God

Analysis:  Star Wars has the best Makeup to date, beating out Children of Paradise.

  • Best Original Song:
  1. “New York, New York”  (New York New York)
  2. “Nobody Does It Better”  (The Spy Who Loved Me)
  3. “Stayin’ Alive”  (Saturday Night Fever)
  4. “East Bound and Down”  (Smokey and the Bandit)
  5. “Candle on the Water”  (Pete’s Dragon)
  6. “If I Can’t Have You”  (Saturday Night Fever)
  7. “Night Fever”  (Saturday Night Fever)
  8. “You Light Up My Life”  (You Light Up My Life)
  9. “Someone’s Waiting for You”  (The Rescuers)

Analysis:  The semi-finalists are in orange.
Not a great year, but the best Top 5 in four years.  But it makes you wonder about the Academy – I barely give a nod to “You Light Up My Life”.  They gave it the Oscar.  They didn’t even give semi-finals positions to the songs from Saturday Night Fever and they nominated “The Slipper and the Rose Waltz” over “New York, New York”.  Good lord, I can’t wait for the 80’s.

  • many-adventures-of-winnie-the-pooh-movie-poster-1977-1020232800Best Animated Film:
  1. The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh

Analysis:  There are eight animated films in this year.  The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh is an anthology film made up of two previously released shorts and isn’t even listed at Oscars.org.  One other, the anime film Space Battleship Yamato is also not listed.  The films, in order, are The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh (solid ***.5), Race for Your Life Charlie Brown (***), The Rescuers (watched it again, wanting it to be better, but it’s only ***), Space Battleship Yamato (***), the Soviet film The Magic Pony (**.5), Pete’s Dragon (only partially animated and one of Disney’s worst kids films – **), the Italian Allegro Non Troppo (**) and Wizards (*.5 – I hate Bakshi films).  This is the only year between 1947 and 1988 that Disney has more than one Animated feature film.
Wolfgang Reitherman has now won four Nighthawk Awards for Best Animated Film, but that’s because he’s directed four ***.5 Disney films with no competition (The Sword in the Stone, The Jungle Book, The Aristocats).

  • cet-obscur-objet-du-desirBest Foreign Film:
  1. That Obscure Object of Desire  **
  2. The Ascent
  3. Soldier of Orange

note:  Films in green were submitted to the Academy but not nominated (none this year among my list).
That Obscure Object of Desire somehow loses both the Oscar and the Globe but, thanks to wins from the NBR and LAFC it wins the Consensus as it rightly deserved to.
Spain has its first win while the Netherlands has its first nomination.  France, in spite of winning the Oscar, fails to earn a Nighthawk nomination for the first time in seven years.  It’s the first time since 1954 that neither France nor Italy is nominated.  It joins 1935 and 1940 (neither of which had any nominees) as the only year to-date with no nominations from France, Japan, Sweden or Italy.
With his final film, Luis Buñuel earns his 12th nomination and 2nd win.  He retires with 280 points and in third place, behind only Bergman and Kurosawa.
I can only find three nominees.  It’s the weakest Top 5 for Foreign Film since 1970 and the weakest Top 10 since 1950.

Analysis:

By Film:

note:  They’re in points order.  You get twice as many points for a win as for a nomination.  Hopefully your math skills will let you figure out the system.

  • Star Wars  (680)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actor, Editing, Cinematography, Original Score, Sound, Art Direction, Visual Effects, Sound Editing, Costume Design, Makeup
  • Annie Hall   (355)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor, Actress, Supporting Actor, Editing, Art Direction
  • Aguirre the Wrath of God  (345)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor, Editing, Cinematography, Original Score, Sound, Costume Design, Makeup, Foreign Film (1973)
  • King Lear  (325)
    • Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Actor, Cinematography, Original Score, Sound, Art Direction, Costume Design, Makeup, Foreign Film (1971)
  • Close Encounters of the Third Kind  (310)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Supporting Actress, Editing, Cinematography, Original Score, Sound, Visual Effects, Sound Editing, Makeup
  • That Obscure Object of Desire  (145)
    • Adapted Screenplay, Editing, Foreign Film
  • Equus  (135)
    • Adapted Screenplay, Actor, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress
  • Julia  (125)
    • Actress, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress
  • The Goodbye Girl  (100)
    • Actor, Actress, Supporting Actress
  • The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh  (80)
    • Adapted Screenplay, Animated Film
  • Dersu Uzala  (80)
    • Cinematography, Art Direction, Costume Design, Foreign Film (1975)
  • The Turning Point  (70)
    • Actress, Actress
  • Black and White in Color  (60)
    • Original Screenplay, Foreign Film (1976)
  • A Bridge Too Far  (60)
    • Sound, Visual Effects, Sound Editing
  • Oh God!  (40)
    • Adapted Screenplay
  • Looking for Mr. Goodbar  (35)
    • Actress
  • Three Women  (30)
    • Supporting Actress
  • Saturday Night Fever  (30)
    • Art Direction, Original Song
  • 1900  (25)
    • Original Score
  • Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger  (20)
    • Visual Effects
  • Cross of Iron  (20)
    • Sound Editing
  • Sorcerer  (20)
    • Sound Editing
  • New York New York  (20)
    • Original Song
  • Jacob the Liar  (20)
    • Foreign Film
  • The Spirit of the Beehive  (20)
    • Foreign Film (1973)
  • Joseph Andrews  (15)
    • Costume Design
  • Jabberwocky  (10)
    • Original Song
  • The Spy Who Loved Me  (10)
    • Original Song
  • Smokey and the Bandit  (10)
    • Original Song
  • Pete’s Dragon  (10)
    • Original Song

Analysis:  Star Wars has the most wins since Bonnie and Clyde, but with only one acting win and two acting nominations, it falls short for the all-time list for points or nominations.

Best Film Not Nominated for Any Nighthawk Awards:

  • The Scar

Analysis:  A good Krzysztof Kieslowski film, a high range *** and my #16 of the year, though it doesn’t actually make my list in any category.

Biggest Awards Film Not Nominated for Any Nighthawk Awards:

  • The Late Show

Analysis:  It’s only the #11 film in awards points.  It won one award (Best Actor – NSFC) and earned one nom each from the Oscars, BAFTAs, Globes and WGA.  Its highest finish on my list is 7th (Supporting Actress).

Nighthawk Golden Globes:

Drama:

  • Best Picture
  1. Star Wars
  2. Aguirre the Wrath of God
  3. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  4. King Lear
  5. Dersu Uzala

Analysis:  This is the weakest Top 5 in in five years.  There is an 11 point drop from #4 to #5; the highest before this year was a 7 point drop back in 1936.

  • Best Director
  1. George Lucas  (Star Wars)
  2. Werner Herzog  (Aguirre the Wrath of God)
  3. Steven Spielberg  (Close Encounters of the Third Kind)
  4. Grigori Kozintsev  (King Lear)
  5. Akira Kurosawa  (Dersu Uzala)

Analysis:  It’s the only nominations for Kozintsev and Lucas.  It’s the first for Herzog.  It’s the second for Spielberg.  On the other hand, it’s the 11th for Kurosawa (the first in 11 years) and he’s at 675 points and in first place by a long, long way.

  • Best Adapted Screenplay:
  1. King Lear
  2. Equus
  3. The Marquise de O
  4. Dersu Uzala

Analysis:  After earning nominations in eight straight years from 1960-67, this is Kurosawa’s first nomination in ten years.  It’s moves him up to 800 points, but thanks to the long gap, he’s been passed by Bergman in the meantime.
The weakest Top 5 in seven years, but it’s tied for the weakest since 1938.

  • Best Original Screenplay:
  1. Star Wars
  2. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  3. Aguirre the Wrath of God
  4. Black and White in Color
  5. Three Women
  • aguirreBest Actor:
  1. Klaus Kinski  (Aguirre the Wrath of God)
  2. Richard Burton  (Equus)
  3. Juri Jarvet  (King Lear)
  4. Richard Dreyfuss  (Close Encounters of the Third Kind)
  5. Marcello Mastroianni  (A Special Day)

Analysis:  It’s the first nominations for Dreyfuss and Kinski and the only ones for Jarvet and Mastroianni (who has several in Comedy).  On the other hand, it’s Burton’s seventh Drama nom.

  • Jane_Fonda_273779kBest Actress
  1. Jane Fonda  (Julia)
  2. Shirley MacLaine  (The Turning Point)
  3. Diane Keaton  (Looking for Mr. Goodbar)
  4. Anne Bancroft  (The Turning Point)
  5. Shelley Duvall  (Three Women)

Analysis:  This is the first nomination for Duvall, the second for Keaton and the third for MacLaine and Bancroft.  It’s only the third for Fonda, but it’s her third win.
This is the weakest Top 5 in five years and there won’t be another one this weak until 1986.

  • Best Supporting Actor:
  1. Alec Guinness  (Star Wars)
  2. Jason Robards  (Julia)
  3. Peter Firth  (Equus)
  4. Peter Cushing  (Star Wars)
  5. James Earl Jones  (Star Wars)

Analysis:  It’s the only nominations for Cushing and Firth.  It’s the second for Jones.  It’s the second in a row (and third overall) for Robards.  Guinness, who did a lot of Comedy early on, earns his sixth Drama nomination and second win.
The strongest Top 5 in five years.

  • Best Supporting Actress:
  1. Vanessa Redgrave  (Julia)
  2. Melinda Dillon  (Close Encounters of the Third Kind)
  3. Sissy Spacek  (Three Women)
  4. Eileen Atkins  (Equus)
  5. Jenny Agutter  (Equus)

Analysis:  These are the only nominations for Agutter and Atkins and the first for Dillon.  It’s already the third for Spacek in just four years.  It’s the third for Redgrave, but her only win.

Points:

  • Star Wars  (390)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actor
  • King Lear  (210)
    • Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Actor
  • Aguirre the Wrath of God  (205)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor
  • Close Encounters of the Third Kind  (200)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor, Supporting Actress
  • Equus  (165)
    • Adapted Screenplay, Actor, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress, Supporting Actress
  • Julia  (160)
    • Actress, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress
  • Dersu Uzala  (135)
    • Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay
  • Three Women  (105)
    • Original Screenplay, Actress, Supporting Actress
  • The Turning Point  (70)
    • Actress, Actress
  • The Marquise de O  (40)
    • Adapted Screenplay
  • Black and White in Color  (40)
    • Original Screenplay
  • A Special Day  (35)
    • Actor
  • Looking for Mr. Goodbar  (35)
    • Actress

Analysis:  With Annie Hall over in Comedy, Star Wars just dominates here.

Best Drama Not Nominated for Any Nighthawk Golden Globes:

  • The Spirit of the Beehive

Analysis:  My #12 film and the 7th best in Drama, but the script isn’t strong enough and it’s not high enough in Picture or Director.

Comedy / Musical:

  • Best Picture
  1. Annie Hall
  2. That Obscure Object of Desire
  3. Jacob the Liar
  4. The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  5. The Goodbye Girl

Analysis:  That Obscure Object of Desire was nominated for Best Foreign Film at the Globes.  Annie Hall wins this by seven points, which is actually less than the year before, when Seven Beauties won by eight.

  • Best Director
  1. Woody Allen  (Annie Hall)
  2. Luis Buñuel  (That Obscure Object of Desire)
  3. Frank Beyer  (Jacob the Liar)
  4. Herbert Ross  (The Goodbye Girl)

Analysis:  These are the only nominations for both Beyer and Ross.  They are counter-balanced by Allen (third nomination and first win) and Buñuel (8th nomination, finishing his career with 495 points and second place in Comedy).

  • Best Adapted Screenplay:
  1. That Obscure Object of Desire
  2. Oh God!
  3. The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh

Analysis:  Luis Buñuel earns his seventh nom and second Comedy win.  This puts him at 360 points and fifth place.

  • Best Original Screenplay:
  1. Annie Hall
  2. The Goodbye Girl
  3. Jacob the Liar
  4. The Late Show
  5. Slap Shot

Analysis:  This is Woody Allen’s second win and eight nomination for Comedy writing, putting him at 400 points and a tie for third place, having caught Preston Sturges.  It’s the first of three wins in four years for him (because in one of those years he made a Drama).

  • woody-allenBest Actor:
  1. Woody Allen  (Annie Hall)
  2. Richard Dreyfuss  (The Goodbye Girl)
  3. John Travolta  (Saturday Night Fever)
  4. Paul Newman  (Slap Shot)
  5. Fernando Rey  (That Obscure Object of Desire)

Analysis:  It’s the first nomination for Travolta.  It’s the second nomination for Rey.  It’s the third nomination in just four years for Dreyfuss.  It’s the third nomination also for Newman.  Woody Allen is also earning his third and his only win in this category, the one time he will sweep Director, Screenplay and Actor in Comedy.
This is the strongest Top 5 in six years and tied for the best since 1964.  Allen is the best winner in this category since 1967.

  • annie-hallBest Actress
  1. Diane Keaton  (Annie Hall)
  2. Marsha Mason  (The Goodbye Girl)
  3. Teresa Wright  (Roseland)
  4. Liza Minnelli  (New York New York)

Analysis:  This is Wright’s only Comedy nomination, years after she had mostly stopped acting.  Minnelli earns her second nomination, Mason her second and Keaton her third.
Even with only four nominees, this is the best Top 5 since 1972 and the second best since 1956.  Diane Keaton is only the second actress to earn a “9”, my highest rating for an acting performance, in the Comedy Actress category, after Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  There won’t be another “9” until 1987.

  • Best Supporting Actor:
  1. Tony Roberts  (Annie Hall)
  2. George Burns  (Oh God!)

Analysis:  It’s the second nomination for each.

  • Best Supporting Actress:
  1. Quinn Cummings  (The Goodbye Girl)
  2. Lily Tomlin  (The Late Show)

Analysis:  It’s the only nomination for Cummings and the first for Tomlin.  The Globes actually nominated Tomlin as a lead.

Points:

  • Annie Hall  (470)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor, Actress, Supporting Actor
  • The Goodbye Girl  (265)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor, Actress, Supporting Actress
  • That Obscure Object of Desire  (210)
    • Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Actor
  • Jacob the Liar  (135)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay
  • The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh  (90)
    • Picture, Adapted Screenplay
  • Slap Shot  (75)
    • Original Screenplay, Actor
  • Oh God!  (70)
    • Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actor
  • The Late Show  (70)
    • Original Screenplay, Supporting Actress
  • Saturday Night Fever  (35)
    • Actor
  • Roseland  (35)
    • Actress
  • New York New York  (35)
    • Actress

Analysis:  Let the dominance of Woody Allen in Comedies begin.  Thanks, in part, to Allen’s direction, the Comedy acting winners are the strongest, as a group, since 1964.  Overall, the Comedy winners as a whole are also the best since 1964, which again speaks to Allen, since the two weaker categories (Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actress) are the two categories that Annie Hall doesn’t win.

Best Comedy Not Nominated for any Nighthawk Golden Globes:

  • Race for Your Life Charlie Brown

Analysis:  My #24 film and my #8 Comedy.  A nice, mid-range *** film, but nowhere near making any list here.

Roundup for the Year in Film:

Eligible Films I Have Seen:  137

By Stars:

  • ****:  6
  • ***.5:  8
  • ***:  55
  • **.5:  29
  • **:  24
  • *.5:  3
  • *:  8
  • .5:  3
  • 0:  1
  • Average Film Score for the Year, out of 100:  57.76

Analysis:  A drop of over a point, the lowest average since 1970 and the second lowest to-date.  The **** and ***.5 films account for just over 10%, the lowest in six years.  But the real problem is the lower films – just over half the films are below ***, the third-highest amount to-date.

Oscar-Nominated Films I Have Not Seen:

  • none

Other Award Nominated Films I Have Not Seen (in descending order of points total):

  • none

Oscar Quality:

Best Picture:  This is the weakest year since 1970.  Yes, it is the year with both Star Wars and Annie Hall.  No other year in the 5 BP Era has two films that are that good (1941 is the only year in the non 5 BP Era that does).  But then there is a huge drop-off to The Goodbye Girl.  There are 68 years that have a better third film than that one.  What keeps this year from falling too far (it’s 40th overall, out of 87 years) is that the final two films (Julia and The Turning Point) are both *** films – Julia a mid-range and The Turning Point a low-range.  There are only 33 years in the 5 BP Era that have a better fifth film than The Turning Point.  This year averages an 82.4 among the films and the average rank is 214.6.  It’s actually the 12th best to-date (out of 50), it’s just that the five years previous to this one are the five best to this point, so this is a big drop.

The Winners:  Among the nominees, the Academy did a pretty good job, with an average of 1.72.  In only four categories does the award not go to the best or second best choice (Actor and Song are 3rd, Adapted Screenplay and Foreign Film are 4th).  And 11 times they gave the award to the best choice – the second highest total since 1962.  Overall, they gave the award to the best choice in every tech category for only the second time (joining 1975).  Overall, they did a great job as well – averaging a 2.63, the fourth best score to-date.  The tech categories are the best, with a 1.11, the best to-date, namely because Star Wars almost swept the tech categories.  Only four categories finish outside the top two, Actor (4), Adapted Screenplay (8), Song (8) and Foreign Film (11).  There won’t be a better year for Oscar winners until 1986.

The Nominees:  Overall, the Oscar score is a 62.8, which is the worst since 1969.  Yet, it’s better than the average score previous to 1970, so it’s not that bad.  The tech categories take a big hit, dropping to 54.4, the lowest since 1971.  Particularly bad are the scores below 35 for both Cinematography and Song.  Acting scores at an 80.3, the lowest  in four years; while Actress scores a perfect 100, no other category breaks 82.  But the major categories are down at 63.8, the lowest since 1969.  Original Screenplay is the only one of those four categories that’s not the lowest since at least 1970 and Adapted Screenplay is the only one to break a 70 (it earns a 71).

Golden Globe Best Picture – Comedy / Musical:  This year is right in the middle of the pack – it ranks 28th out of 65 years.  It does it with one truly great film (Annie Hall – the 2nd best film ever nominated in this category behind Hannah and Her Sisters), one very good film (The Goodbye Girl) and three solid mid-range *** films (Saturday Night Fever, High Anxiety, New York New York).  Those are my #1, 5, 11, 14 and 17 films for Comedy / Musical.  However, my #2, 3, 14 and 16 are all Foreign films that wouldn’t have been eligible.  That does leave some films that I think are better that they passed over (The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh, Oh God!, Slap Shot, Race for Your Life Charlie Brown, The Late Show, The Spy Who Loved Me), but really, given the options in this year, they didn’t do that badly.  But they did blow this badly in one way – they gave the award to The Goodbye Girl.  Until last year, this was the only time a film had lost Comedy – Picture at the Globes then gone on to win the Oscar for Best Picture, but at least last year it was Grand Budapest Hotel that won.  This one they just got way wrong.

Top 5 Films of the Year:

1  –  Star Wars  (reviewed here and here)

2  –  Annie Hall  (reviewed here and here)

3  –  Aguirre the Wrath of God  (reviewed here)

A thinking man's Sci-Fi film.

A thinking man’s Sci-Fi film.

4  –  Close Encounters of the Third Kind  (dir. Steven Spielberg)

Close Encounters and Star Wars were treated as blood brothers in 1977 (they were called such by the Christian Science Monitor according to Inside Oscar).  It’s easy to see why – two Science Fiction films treated with the kind of critical acclaim that had only previously gone to 2001, made by two talented directors who had both come out of film school and who were close friends.  They were the two biggest films of the year, both among the Top 10 of all-time and both featured magnificent music from John Williams.

But, in reality, the two films are very different.  In a sense, they’re not even in the same genre.  Close Encounters deals with a real, if fictional concept, the visit to this planet by aliens.  It falls more towards Hard Science-Fiction, the school that developed from Jules Verne and relied on serious scientific research to support the fiction.  Star Wars goes beyond what we would even call Soft Science-Fiction and into the realm of Science Fantasy, combining elements of Fantasy (most notably, in this case, from Joseph Campbell) and setting them among space and interstellar travel.  Star Wars is an action film and Close Encounters is most assuredly not.

This film develops slowly.  We gradually learn that various strange things have been happening – things showing up on radar, strange objects appearing in places they shouldn’t be at random times.  Several people are exposed to the actions of a UFO, that first encounter, and they end up sun-burned, but also scarred emotionally.  There is something going on deep within the psyche of Roy Neary, played so well by Richard Dreyfuss.  It’s a deep, fascinating performance from Dreyfuss and one of his best as a man who knows what he has seen, but can not explain what is happening to him.  Yet, he is joined by Melinda Dillon, whose young son has also been scarred by the visit.

All of this seems strange, but with Spielberg’s deft hand at direction, with the enchanting music of John Williams, with the Oscar-winning cinematography, all of it comes together to tell a compelling story.  It must have seemed like a nice change to go from Star Wars to this – two films that seem like they should be so similar, and yet, are so vastly different on almost every level.

5  –  King Lear  (reviewed here)

5 Worst Films  (#1 being the worst):

  1. Desperate Living
  2. Kong Island
  3. Empire of the Ants
  4. Shock Waves
  5. Bad

note:  Not surprisingly, the bottom 5 includes a Wild Nature film from AIP (Empire of the Ants).  In fact, three of the bottom five are Horror films.  Only four of the 16 Horror films I have seen from this year made the Top 100 for the year and all 10 English language Horror films where ranked between #110 and #136.

John Waters finishes dead last for the second time in three years.

John Waters finishes dead last for the second time in three years.

Desperate Living  (dir. John Waters)

I don’t want to have to repeat my little cartoon, so you can find it way down in this same spot of this post.  I don’t actually have much to say about this film.  I’m giving myself a pass on watching it again, especially two years after watching another John Waters film again for this same spot.  This is, thankfully, the last zero star film for three years, although 1980 will actually have two.

Perhaps I can say enough about this film by pointing out that the poster contains a dead rat on a plate.  That is the kind of thing that John Waters will do.  Or that this involves his usual mess of characters – a cross-dressing policeman, a self-hating lesbian wrestler, a “queen” who wants to give all her subjects rabies.  Maybe I don’t find his use of certain outcast groups of society as part of his group of freaks funny (people might argue that Waters humanizes them, but I think he de-humanizes everyone).  Maybe I can’t find rabies funny because I’ve read books about it and it’s as terrifying a disease as has ever existed (death rate among Ebola: 50%, death rate among rabies if not getting the vaccination before symptoms occur: 100%).

I don’t mind gore in my films (I watch Ash vs Evil Dead).  I don’t mind things getting weird (I like David Lynch).  But Waters just takes things he thinks might offend people and throws them all in a blender – in this film, a woman smothers her husband, is exiled to a slum of Waters’ type freaks, follows the leader, betraying others while the leader is infecting people with rabies and then is executed with a shotgun up the anus.  Hey, if that’s your idea of a good time, go for it.  I’ll be reviewing Caligula in three years and that may be your idea of a good time too.

Points:

  • Most Nighthawk Nominations:   Star Wars  (14)
  • Most Nighthawk Awards:  Star Wars  (12)
  • Most Nighthawk Points:  Star Wars  (680)
  • Worst Film Nominated for a Nighthawk Award:  Sorcerer
  • 2nd Place Award:  Close Encounters of the Third Kind  (Supporting Actress, Cinematography, Original Score, Sound, Visual Effects, Sound Editing)
  • 6th Place Award:  That Obscure Object of Desire  (Picture, Director)
  • Most Nighthawk Drama Nominations:  Star Wars  (6)
  • Most Nighthawk Drama Awards:  Star Wars  (4)
  • Most Nighthawk Drama Points:  Star Wars  (390)
  • Worst Film Nominated for a Nighthawk Drama Award:  Looking for Mr. Goodbar
  • Most Nighthawk Comedy Nominations:  Annie Hall  (6)
  • Most Nighthawk Comedy Awards:  Annie Hall  (6)
  • Most Nighthawk Comedy Points:  Annie Hall  (470)
  • Worst Film Nominated for a Nighthawk Comedy Award:  Roseland

Note:  * means a Nighthawk record up to this point; ** ties a Nighthawk record

Progressive Leaders:

  • Most Nighthawk Nominations:  The Wizard of Oz  /  The Godfather  (18)
  • Most Nighthawk Awards:  The Wizard of Oz  /  Bonnie and Clyde  (14)
  • Most Nighthawk Points:  Bonnie and Clyde  (865)
  • Most Nighthawk Awards without winning Best Picture:  Frankenstein  /  The Magnificent Ambersons  (6)
  • Most Nighthawk Nominations without a Best Picture Nomination:  Yojimbo  (11)
  • Most Nighthawk Nominations without a Nighthawk Award:  Throne of Blood (13)
  • Actor:  Humphrey Bogart  (475)
  • Actress:  Katharine Hepburn  (560)
  • Director:   Billy Wilder  (585)
  • Writer:  Billy Wilder  (960)
  • Cinematographer:  Arthur Edeson  /  Gregg Toland / Sven Nykvist  (200)
  • Composer:  Max Steiner  (450)
  • Foreign Film:  Akira Kurosawa  (460)

Breakdown by Genre  (Foreign in parenthesis, best film in genre following, avg. score is afterwards, in parenthesis):

  • Foreign:  61  –  King Lear  (64.4)
  • Drama:  59 (35)  –  King Lear  (61.3)
  • Comedy:  19 (8)  –  Annie Hall  (63.5)
  • Horror:  16 (6)  –  Dripping Deep Red  (33.9)
  • Musical:  9 (2)  –  Saturday Night Fever  (53.8)
  • Kids:  6 (1)  –  The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh  (60.5)
  • Action:  6 (1)  –  The Spy Who Loved Me  (60)
  • Sci-Fi:  5 (2)  –  Star Wars  (64.4)
  • Fantasy:  4 (1)  –  The Spirit of the Beehive  (60.8)
  • Crime:  3 (3)  –  Ossessione  (58.7)
  • Adventure:  3 (2)  –  Aguirre the Wrath of God  (49)
  • War:  2  –  Cross of Iron  (69)
  • Suspense:  2  –  Black Sunday  (48.5)
  • Mystery:  1  –  The Late Show  (71)
  • Western:  1  –  Another Man Another Chance  (48)

Analysis:  There are almost as many Foreign Dramas as there were Dramas the year before.  Dramas makes up 43% of the films, the highest in four years and the second highest since 1962.  The percentage of non-genre films (Drama, Comedy, Musical) is the highest since 1964.  With the advent of New Yorker Films and their flood of Foreign films hitting the States, this year sets a new high for Foreign films and is the only year where Foreign films account for more than 40% of the total.  This year has the most Sci-Fi films in nine years and the most Fantasy films in 14 years.  It also has the fewest Westerns since 1942.  Horror films, a genre not known for very good films, has its lowest average to-date, as do Suspense.
For the first time since 1935 there are multiple Adventure films in the Top 10.  For the first time ever there are multiple Sci-Fi films in the Top 10.  For the first time in 16 years and only fifth time to-date, there is only Drama in the Top 10.  There is a Kids film in the Top 10 for the first time since 1964.  Those three genres account for 2% of the Top 10 films in the first 50 years of the Nighthawk Awards while in this one they make up 50%.  The Spirit of the Beehive is the first Fantasy film in the Top 20 since 1961.  There are 12 Foreign Films in the Top 20, tying the high to-date.  Star Wars becomes only the second Sci-Fi film to win the Nighthawk Award.

Studio Note:  For the second year in a row no major studio has more than 11 films, but New Yorker Films has 19, the first time a non-major leads overall.  As a result, New Yorker Films gets up to 77 total films and passes Disney, moving into the Top 10 to-date for a studio.  Warner Bros only has four films, its lowest since 1929.
For the first time in seven years, Paramount doesn’t have a Top 10 film.  Warners is also missing a Top 10 film for the first time since 1970.  Disney has its first Top 10 film since 1964.  Paramount doesn’t even have a Top 20 film, missing out for the first time since 1959, after a four-year total that had 17 Top 20 films.  20th Century-Fox becomes the sixth studio to win a fourth Nighthawk Award.

43 Films Eligible for Best Foreign Film (alphabetical, with director and country in parenthesis – red are ****, blue are ***.5 – both those colors qualify for my Best Foreign Film Award; an asterisk means it was the Official selection for the Oscar, two asterisks were nominated, three asterisks won the Oscar):

  • Alambrista  (Young, USA)
  • Amar Akbar Anthony  (Desai, India)
  • The American Friend  (Wenders, West Germany)  *
  • The Ascent  (Shepitko, USSR)  *
  • Camouflage  (Zanussia, Poland)  *
  • Ceddo  (Sembene, Senegal)
  • The Consequence  (Peterson, West Germany)
  • Le Crabe Tambour  (Schoendoerffer, France)
  • The Cycle  (Mehrjui, Iran)  *
  • The Devil Probably  (Bresson, France)
  • Elisa, Vida Mia  (Saura, Spain)
  • The Fish That Smokes  (Chalbaud, Venezuela)  *
  • Hitch-hike  (Campanile, Italy)
  • House  (Obayashi, Japan)
  • In the Name of the Pope King  (Magni, Italy)
  • Iphigenia  (Cacoyannis, Greece)  **
  • J.A. Martin Photographer  (Beaudin, Canada)  *
  • The Lacemaker  (Goretta, France)
  • Let Joy Reign Supreme  (Tavernier, France)
  • Lucio Flavio o Passagerieos de Agonia  (Babenco, Argentina)
  • Madame Rosa  (Mizrahi, France)  ***
  • Man on the Roof  (Widerberg, Sweden)  *
  • The Man Who Loved Women  (Truffaut, France)
  • Matinee  (Hermosillo, Mexico)
  • A Model Couple  (Klein, France)
  • Mt. Hakkoda  (Moritani, Japan)  *
  • Operation Thunderbolt  (Golan, Israel)  **
  • Padre padrone  (Taviani, Italy)
  • Pafnucio Santo  (Corkidi, Mexico)  *
  • The Perfumed Nightmare  (Tahimik, Philippines)
  • The Psychic  (Fulci, Italy)
  • Rasputin  (Klimov, USSR)
  • The Serpent’s Egg  (Bergman, Sweden)
  • The Shaolin 36th Chamber  (Chia-liang, Hong Kong)
  • Soldier of Orange  (Verhoeven, Netherlands)  *
  • Space Battleship Yamato  (Masuda, Japan)
  • A Special Day  (Scola, Italy)  **
  • The Stationmaster’s Wife  (Fassbinder, West Germany)
  • Stroszek  (Herzog, West Germany)
  • Suspiria  (Argento, Italy)
  • Tent of Miracles  (dos Santos, Brazil)  *
  • That Obscure Object of Desire  (Buñuel, Spain)  **
  • Unfinished Piece for Player Piano  (Mikhalkov, USSR)

Note: I have my first films from Venezuela and the USA (where I count any film made in a language other than English).  I have my only film from Iran between 1969 and 1987.  I have no film from Yugoslavia for the first time since 1970, mainly because it’s the first year no film is submitted from there to the Oscars for the first time since 1970.  I have seen three films from Mexico – my most since 1961.  For the fifth year in a row, France has the most (7 – its fewest since 1968) and Italy the second most (6).

Foreign Films Submitted for Best Foreign Film at the Oscars That I Haven’t Seen:

  • Argentina:  What Does Fall Mean  (dir. Portela / Kohon)
  • Austria:  I Want to Live  (dir. Eggers)
  • Belgium:  Rubens  (dir. Verhavert)
  • Denmark:  Boys  (dir. Malmros)
  • East Germany:  Mom, I Am Alive  (dir. Wolf)
  • Hungary:  A Strange Hole  (dir. Sandor)
  • India:  Manthan  (dir. Benegal)
  • Morocco:  Blood Wedding  (dir. Ben-Barka)

note:  At this point I am making a concerted effort to see as many submitted films as I can.  The full list can be found here.  This year I am 16 for 24.
It’s the second time I’m missing Argentina.  It is the only time in its five submissions I am missing East Germany.  It’s only the second time in 16 submissions I am missing India.  It’s the third time I am missing the Hungarian submission.  It’s Morocco’s first submission.  It’s the fifth time in seven submissions I’m missing Belgium.  It’s Austria’s third submission and I’m missing all of them.  Denmark continues to be the worst – it’s the 15th out of 18 Danish submissions that I am missing.
This year ties two other years for the most submissions to date.  But, the countries continue to differ.  There are nine countries that are different on this list from the year before.  Those countries that aren’t here include Czechoslovakia (after four straight submissions, this the last year they don’t submit until 1988), Switzerland (after five straight), Yugoslavia (after six straight, this is the last year of the country’s existence when it fails to submit) and Egypt (last skipped in 1969).  In this year are Japan (after the only year it didn’t submit) and several countries with one year absences (Israel, Greece, India, Canada).  Austria submits for only the third time and there are first time submissions from Iran, Morocco and Venezuela.

Films Eligible in This Year But Originally Released in a Different Year:

  • Ossessione  (1943)
  • Record of a Tenement Gentleman  (1947)
  • River and Death  (1955)
  • Equinox Flower  (1958)
  • Kong Island  (1968)
  • Katzelmacher  (1969)
  • Count Dracula  (1970)
  • Gods of the Plague  (1970)
  • The Ceremony  (1971)
  • The Goalie’s Anxiety at the Penalty Kick  (1971)
  • King Lear  (1971)
  • The True Nature of Bernadette  (1972)
  • Aguirre the Wrath of God  (1973)
  • The Spirit of the Beehive  (1973)
  • Alice in the Cities  (1974)
  • Ankur  (1974)
  • Conversation Piece  (1974)
  • Effi Briest  (1974)
  • Immoral Tales  (1974)
  • Les Ordres  (1974)
  • We All Loved Each Other So Much  (1974)
  • Black Moon  (1975)
  • The Day That Shook the World  (1975)
  • Dersu Uzala  (1975)
  • Dripping Deep Red  (1975)
  • Fox and His Friends  (1975)
  • The Magic Pony  (1975)
  • Mother Kusters Goes to Heaven  (1975)
  • Salo  (1975)
  • 1900  (1976)
  • Aces High  (1976)
  • Allegro Non Troppo  (1976)
  • Black and White in Color  (1976)
  • Chinese Roulette  (1976)
  • Cria Cuervos  (1976)
  • The Eagle Has Landed  (1976)
  • Heart of Glass  (1976)
  • High Street  (1976)
  • In the Realm of the Senses  (1976)
  • Jacob the Liar  (1976)
  • Jonah Who Will Be 25 in the Year 2000  (1976)
  • Magic Blade  (1976)
  • The Marquise de O  (1976)
  • Mohammed – Messenger of God  (1976)
  • Pardon Mon Affaire  (1976)
  • The Scar  (1976)
  • The Slipper and the Rose  (1976)
  • Welcome to L.A.  (1976)

Note:  These 47 films average a 63.  Kong Island is one of the worst films of the year, but it is more than balanced out by the numerous films near the top.  These films account for 31 Nighthawk nominations, including 11 each for King Lear and Aguirre, both of which are nominated for Picture, Director, writing and Actor.

Films Not Listed at Oscars.org:

  • Aces High
  • Amar Akbar Anthony
  • Ankur
  • Chinese Roulette
  • Conversation Piece
  • The Day That Shook the World
  • Death Bed: The Bed That Eats
  • Drive-In Massacre
  • Effi Briest
  • Equinox Flower
  • The Fish That Smokes
  • Gods of the Plague
  • Heart of Glass
  • High Street
  • House
  • J.A. Martin Photographer
  • Jacob the Liar
  • Katzelmacher
  • Kong Island
  • The Magic Pony
  • The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  • Matinee
  • A Model Couple
  • Mother Kusters Goes to Heaven
  • Mt. Hakkoda
  • Ossessione
  • Pafnucio Santo
  • The Perfumed Nightmare
  • Planet Outlaws
  • Record of a Tenement Gentleman
  • River and Death
  • Salo
  • The Scar
  • Space Battleship Yamato

Note:  I use the list at Oscars.org for deciding which year films are eligible in.  Some films, however, don’t appear in that database.  For those films, I use the IMDb.  These are the films that aren’t listed in the Oscars.org database but that end up in this year.
As is usually the case, most of these are Foreign films which never got an L.A. release.  The list this time has several films that were submitted for Best Foreign Film: The Day That Shook the World, The Fish That Smokes, High Street, J.A. Martin Photographer, Jacob the Liar, Mt. Hakkoda, Pafnucio Santo.

Films Released This Year Originally But Eligible in a Different Year:

  • The Ascent  (1978)
  • Ceddo  (1978)
  • The Duellists  (1978)
  • Eraserhead  (1978)
  • Hitch-Hike  (1978)
  • Iphigenia  (1978)
  • Madame Rosa  (1978)
  • Martin  (1978)
  • The Mouse and His Child  (1978)
  • Padre padrone  (1978)
  • The Shaolin 36th Chamber  (1978)
  • Alambrista  (1979)
  • The Consequence  (1979)
  • Cosmos: War of the Planets  (1979)
  • The Cycle  (1979)
  • Jubilee  (1979)
  • The Last Wave  (1979)
  • Operation Thunderbolt  (1979)
  • A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man  (1979)
  • The Psychic  (1979)
  • Soldier of Orange  (1979)
  • Tent of Miracles  (1979)
  • ABBA: The Movie  (1980)
  • Why Shoot the Teacher?  (1980)
  • Camoflauge  (1981)
  • Lucio Flavio o Passagerios de Agonia  (1981)
  • Unfinished Piece for Player Piano  (1982)
  • Sleeping Dogs  (1983)
  • The Stationmaster’s Wife  (1983)
  • Le Crabe Tambour  (1984)
  • Elisa, Vida Mia  (1984)
  • Dead End  (1985)
  • In the Name of the Pope King  (1986)
  • Rasputin  (1986)
  • The Devil Probably  (2011)

Note:  These 35 films average a 61.  There are two truly awful films (Martin, Cosmos: War of the Planets), but The Ascent and Soldier of Orange are the only films above ***.

This is my pantry.

This is my pantry.

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