Screen Shot 2021-09-25 at 7.20.43 AMThis is the 12th part of the countdown of the Top 1000 Films of the first Century of Film (1912-2011).  The introduction can be found here.  Just click here to find the other parts.

Films 450 through 428 are a 92.  The rest are a 93.  Both are mid ****. (more…)

Screen Shot 2021-07-15 at 3.58.42 PMThis is the 10th part of the Top 1000 list.  The introduction can be found here.  This might be the only group of 50 in the Top 1000 without a single Hitchcock, Spielberg, Kurosawa or Woody Allen film among them.
Except for the four films at the bottom, these are all a 91 which is mid-range ****.  The bottom four films are all 92. (more…)

This is the next batch of 50 films counting down my Top 1000 Films of All-Time.  The films down through Footlight Parade all earn an 86 while the rest of them earn an 87, which is high ***.5.  I recommend reading the introduction first.  For the previous installments, click on the Top 1000 among the tags at the top of the post.

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This scene isn’t in the original novel even though it comes during the period of time covered by the novel. Nor is it ever mentioned in the novel that the Don’s birthday is December 7. This is pure Coppola.

My Top 10

  1. The Godfather Part II
  2. Young Frankenstein
  3. The Parallax View
  4. Murder on the Orient Express
  5. Lenny
  6. The Front Page
  7. The Taking of Pelham One Two Three
  8. The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz
  9. Thieves Like Us
  10. Sanshiro Sugata

Note:  If you look at my original Nighthawk Awards you will only see nine films listed.  But, re-watching The Taking of Pelham One Two Three, which I needed to review anyway because it was a WGA nominee, I was reminded that it should have been on my list in the first place because the script really is quite good. (more…)

A nice ensemble pic from M*A*S*H that doesn’t really have a corresponding scene in the book.

My Top 10:

  1. M*A*S*H
  2. The Twelve Chairs
  3. Women in Love
  4. Lovers and Other Strangers
  5. Patton
  6. Floating Weeds
  7. The Joke
  8. Mississippi Mermaid
  9. Where’s Poppa?
  10. Catch-22

Note:  Not a strong Top 10, although at least it has 10.  The 2-5 are the weakest as a whole since 1965 and there won’t be a weaker group until 1976.  They look even weaker because they are between two very strong years.  Patton would have been #9 in 1969. (more…)

Revisiting Childhood Movies Part XXII:

Spaceballs

  • Director:  Mel Brooks
  • Writer:  Mel Brooks / Ronny Graham / Thomas Meehan
  • Producer:  Mel Brooks
  • Stars:  Rick Moranis, Bill Pullman, Daphne Zuniga, Mel Brooks, John Candy
  • Studio:  MGM/UA
  • Award Nominations:  none
  • Length:  96 min
  • Genre:  Comedy (Parody)
  • MPAA Rating:  PG
  • Release Date:  26 June 1987
  • Box Office Gross:  $38.11 mil  (#31 – 1987)
  • Ebert Rating:  **.5
  • My Rating:  ***
  • My Rank:  #55 (year)
  • Nighthawk Nominations:  none
  • Nighthawk Notables:  Best Opening, Best Line Not from The Princess Bride (“Now you see that evil will always triumph because good is dumb.”)
  • First Watched:  on video when first released
  • Number of Times Watched as a Kid:  5 or so

As a Kid:  When I first saw this, I didn’t have that much of a knowledge of film because, hey, because I was still a kid.  But I knew Star Wars.  Good lord, did I ever know Star Wars.  So all the Star Wars references worked perfectly for me.  I even got the Wizard of Oz references (and even the Bridge on the River Kwai reference).  But to me, at the time, this was mostly a way of humorously looking at the movie that was not only a big thing in my life but had been the big thing in my life for a decade. (more…)

swI have always been a proponent of the idea that I can separate what I think is brilliant from what I personally enjoy.  Let’s just look at 2015.  I think that Carol and The Revenant were the two best films of the year.  But if I’m going to sit and watch a movie from 2015, odds are it will be The Force Awakens (this is borne out by the fact that I’ve seen Carol twice, The Revenant all the way through once and The Force Awakens, at a modest count, 21 times complete plus the final 20 minutes about 15 more).

To that extent, I have finally culled together a list of my 100 Favorite Films, the ones I am most likely to sit still and watch, or at least not change the station if I come across them.  They’re not heavy Drama.  In fact, when I went through the genres, only one film on the entire list is one that I classify primarily as Drama (Casablanca).

It’s really hard to do this kind of list when you’ve seen as many films as I have (14,000+).  I put it together by going through year by year and adding films, and once I hit 100, knocking off the films at the bottom.  When I first read Veronica a list of 50 films, I then pointed out that those were the 50 I was about to delete because they didn’t make the list and she was stunned.  “But you love those films!” she pointed out.  “But I love the Top 100 even more,” I replied.  It was very, very tough.  Though they are easily two of the greatest directors of all-time if not the two greatest directors of all-time, not a single Kurosawa or Kubrick film ended up on the list.  There is no Bergman.  There is no David Lean.  The Ealing Comedies and the Hammer Horror, both of which I love so much I wrote about them only have one film each.  I did For Love of Film posts for James Bond (1 film) and Star Trek (2 films).  It’s really, really hard to narrow it all down. (more…)

Suicide is painless indeed.

Suicide is painless indeed.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category (or Globe, in the Globes section).  Films in blue were nominated.  Films with an asterisk (*) were Consensus nominees (a scale I put together based on the various awards) while those with a double asterisk (**) were the Consensus winners.

I’m listing the top 7 in the categories but only the top 5 earn Nighthawk nominations.  Why am I only listing the Top 7 when I’ve been listing the Top 10 for quite a while now?  Well, how should I put this?  This is a TERRIBLE YEAR FOR FILM.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. M*A*S*H  **
  2. Five Easy Pieces  *
  3. Patton  *
  4. The Twelve Chairs
  5. Women in Love
  6. Mississippi Mermaid
  7. Lovers and Other Strangers

Analysis:  How terrible a year in film?  Well, there are only three **** films.  It’s the first year since 1930 that there have been less than four.  Patton is also the weakest #3 film since 1930.  Five Easy Pieces is the weakest #2 film since 1945.  In the 1960’s M*A*S*H would have won the award in several years; Five Easy Pieces would have only been nominated in three years.  In the 1950’s, M*A*S*H would only have won the award in two years and Patton would have never finished higher than sixth.  Both the Top 5 and the Top 10 are the weakest since 1945. (more…)

the three demented stars of M*A*S*H: Elliot Gould, Tom Skerritt and Donald Sutherland

My Top 20:

  1. M*A*S*H
  2. Five Easy Pieces
  3. Patton
  4. Women in Love
  5. The Twelve Chairs
  6. Mississippi Mermaid
  7. Lovers and Other Strangers
  8. Floating Weeds
  9. The Passion of Anna
  10. The Milky Way
  11. The Human Condition Part III
  12. The Joke
  13. Big Dig
  14. The Aristocats
  15. The Ballad of Cable Hogue
  16. Catch-22
  17. Tristana
  18. My Night at Maud’s
  19. Au Hasard Balthazar
  20. The Wild Child (more…)