departed

Nothing Wahlberg says in the film is anything like the dialogue in the original film but damn it’s brilliant.

My Top 10

  1. The Departed
  2. Children of Men
  3. Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story
  4. The Prestige
  5. Perfume
  6. Casino Royale
  7. Army of Shadows
  8. The Painted Veil
  9. Thank You for Smoking
  10. Notes on a Scandal

note:  An excellent Top 5 and Top 10. (more…)

Screen Shot 2020-11-14 at 11.39.57 AMAll of these films except the last one is an 88.  The last one is an 89.  All are low ****.  The introduction is here. (more…)

This is the next batch of 50 films counting down my Top 1000 Films of All-Time.  Once again, they all earn an 86, which is high ***.5.  I recommend reading the introduction first.  The first batch of 50 were here. (more…)

A Century of Film


Action Films


The Genre

For a lot of people (and for me when I originally broke things into genres after first starting to track all of my movies back in 1989), this would be considered Action-Adventure.  And if that were the case, there would be a long, complex history going back to the early days of film history and the total numbers would be close to those of Horror or Musicals.  However, that’s not the case.  For me, an Action film centers around the action itself while for the most part Adventure films center around a journey of some sort.  But they crossed paths along the way.  Going forward, by 1959, Action was in dead last as a genre for total films but Adventure was in sixth place.  But, since then, Action is the fourth highest genre and Adventure is among the five lowest.

(more…)

The brilliant ending to the film that isn’t in the novel but fits the novel’s post-modern metaphysical style.

My Top 10

  1. The French Lieutenant’s Woman
  2. Ragtime
  3. Excalibur
  4. The Lady from Musashino
  5. Superman II

note:  That’s it.  My original list did have six films but I ended up cutting Buddy Buddy after watching it again (which is unlikely to bother anyone since it seemed I had a higher opinion of it than most). (more…)

This opening bit might not be in the book but most of what follows is.

My Top 10

  1. That Obscure Object of Desire
  2. King Lear
  3. Equus
  4. Oh God
  5. The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  6. The Marquise de O
  7. Dersu Uzala

Note:  That’s it.  That’s all I’ve got.  I had actually placed Jacob the Liar on the list (at #4) but when I looked at it again, I realized that it was a screenplay first, then, when cutbacks in film production in East Germany delayed the film for nearly a decade, it was rewritten as a novel.  But the screenplay had already existed which means, in spite of the credits, it’s not really an adapted script and I can skip having to review a very good film (and book) that are also brutally depressing so Happy New Year (2019) to me. (more…)

“You realize who this linen girl Tanya is?” (p 612 – Pevear / Volokhonsky translation)

My Top 9:

  1. Dr. Zhivago
  2. The Pawnbroker
  3. The Spy Who Came in From the Cold
  4. The Collector
  5. A Thousand Clowns
  6. King Rat
  7. The Human Condition: Part III
  8. Thunderball
  9. The Train

Note:  That’s it.  After years and years of a list longer than ten, I can only come up with nine films and one of those, The Train, was actually nominated in the Original Screenplay category even though it was based on Rose Valland’s book. (more…)

One of film’s most iconic moments and not in the original at all.

My Top 10:

  1. Dr. Strangelove
  2. High and Low
  3. Harakiri
  4. Mary Poppins
  5. The Americanization of Emily
  6. The Best Man
  7. The Night of the Iguana
  8. The Chalk Garden
  9. Goldfinger
  10. My Fair Lady

Note:  There are 20 films on my list.  Only one of the other ten is reviewed below as a WGA nominee (Seven Days in May).  The other nine are all listed towards the bottom of the post. (more…)

swI have always been a proponent of the idea that I can separate what I think is brilliant from what I personally enjoy.  Let’s just look at 2015.  I think that Carol and The Revenant were the two best films of the year.  But if I’m going to sit and watch a movie from 2015, odds are it will be The Force Awakens (this is borne out by the fact that I’ve seen Carol twice, The Revenant all the way through once and The Force Awakens, at a modest count, 21 times complete plus the final 20 minutes about 15 more).

To that extent, I have finally culled together a list of my 100 Favorite Films, the ones I am most likely to sit still and watch, or at least not change the station if I come across them.  They’re not heavy Drama.  In fact, when I went through the genres, only one film on the entire list is one that I classify primarily as Drama (Casablanca).

It’s really hard to do this kind of list when you’ve seen as many films as I have (14,000+).  I put it together by going through year by year and adding films, and once I hit 100, knocking off the films at the bottom.  When I first read Veronica a list of 50 films, I then pointed out that those were the 50 I was about to delete because they didn’t make the list and she was stunned.  “But you love those films!” she pointed out.  “But I love the Top 100 even more,” I replied.  It was very, very tough.  Though they are easily two of the greatest directors of all-time if not the two greatest directors of all-time, not a single Kurosawa or Kubrick film ended up on the list.  There is no Bergman.  There is no David Lean.  The Ealing Comedies and the Hammer Horror, both of which I love so much I wrote about them only have one film each.  I did For Love of Film posts for James Bond (1 film) and Star Trek (2 films).  It’s really, really hard to narrow it all down. (more…)

spectre_ver5SPECTRE

  • Year:  2015
  • Director:  Sam Mendes
  • Series Rank:  #5
  • Bond Girl:  Léa Seydoux (Madeleine Swann), Monica Bellucci (Lucia Sciarra)
  • Bond Villain:  Christoph Waltz (Franz Oberhauser), Dave Bautista (Mr. Hinx), Jesper Christensen (Mr. White)
  • Bond Support:  Ralph Fiennes (M), Naomie Harris (Moneypenny), Ben Whishaw (Q), Rory Kinnear (Bill Tanner)

SPOILER-FREE

The first two Daniel Craig films had gone back to the basics, stripping away all the trappings of the James Bond character as developed in the films and re-imagined him as the original Ian Fleming spy in the 21st Century.  Then came Skyfall, which re-integrated vital parts of the Bond universe with this new Bond.  Skyfall was definitely the best Bond film ever made, but there was no question it wasn’t going to be the last – it cried out for more adventures with a new M, Moneypenny and Q supporting him in whatever would come next.  If SPECTRE is indeed the last film with Daniel Craig as Bond, indeed, if it were to be the last Bond film ever, it would be a satisfying conclusion to one of the great franchises in film history. (more…)