Probably my mother's favorite movie, at least in part because Chris Cooper actually plays the hero.

Probably my mother’s favorite movie, at least in part because Chris Cooper actually plays the hero.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category (or Globe, in the Globes section).  Films in blue were nominated.  Films (or directors) in olive are links to earlier posts that I don’t want to have show up in blue and be mistaken for a nominee.  Films with an asterisk (*) were Consensus nominees (a scale I put together based on the various awards) while those with a double asterisk (**) were the Consensus winners.

I’m listing the top 12 in the categories but only the top 5 earn Nighthawk nominations.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. Lone Star
  2. Trainspotting
  3. The English Patient
  4. Fargo
  5. Hamlet
  6. Secrets & Lies
  7. Jerry Maguire
  8. In the Bleak Midwinter
  9. Cold Comfort Farm
  10. The Crucible
  11. Romeo + Juliet
  12. Emma

Analysis:  There are a lot of years that have a better #1 film than Lone Star.  But not many have a better #2 than Trainspotting.  Even fewer have a better #3 than The English Patient.  The Top three films are tied with several others years for third best to-date (behind 1946 and 1950).  But Fargo is the best #4 film to-date (actually, it’s almost certainly the best #4 film ever).  And only a handful of years have a #5 film as good as Hamlet.  As a result, this year is tied with 1946 for the best Top 4 to-date and Top 5 to-date (and, probably, all-time).  There is a three point drop after that, so it’s only the second best Top 6, then another two point drop.  But, because all 10 films are ****, it is in the 6th best Top 10 to-date, behind only 1989, 1960, 1994, 1962 and 1991.
One thing I must make mention of here.  I don’t count documentaries, as I have mentioned in the past.  That is particularly relevant in this year, a year in which I actually went to see two documentaries in the theater (The Celluloid Closet, Looking for Richard) and there are a couple of others which are phenomenal (When We Were Kings, Paradise Lost).  I went with 12 films because this is my whole list of **** films.
Two of these films rank among the films I have watched the most over the last 20 years (Trainspotting, In the Bleak Midwinter). (more…)

Advertisements
Greed, for lack of a better word, is bad.

Greed is, for lack of a better word, bad.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category (or Globe, in the Globes section).  Films in blue were nominated (the Globes still didn’t have nominees).  Films with an asterisk (*) were Consensus nominees (a scale I put together based on the various awards) while those with a double asterisk (**) were the Consensus winner.

Now that we have hit 1948, I will probably do more discussion in the major categories.  That’s because we’ve hit the BAFTAs and we’ve hit the first guild awards (DGA, WGA) and we get to what I call “Consensus” awards – what the various groups decided at the time.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre  **
  2. Hamlet  *
  3. Red River
  4. Force of Evil
  5. Day of Wrath

(more…)

Kris Kristofferson threatens Matthew McConaughey in a tense moment from Lone Star (1996)

My Top 20:

  1. Lone Star
  2. Trainspotting
  3. The English Patient
  4. Fargo
  5. Hamlet
  6. Secrets and Lies
  7. In the Bleak Midwinter
  8. The Crucible
  9. Jerry Maguire
  10. Cold Comfort Farm
  11. Romeo + Juliet
  12. Evita
  13. Emma
  14. Star Trek: First Contact
  15. Beautiful Girls
  16. Everyone Says I Love You
  17. Breaking the Waves
  18. The Birdcage
  19. The People vs. Larry Flynt
  20. Ridicule

(more…)

my Norton Critical Editions

They are indispensable for serious literature students.  They are also great to have for those who love individual works.  Either way, they offer an amazing amount of information with each individual title.  They are a good addition to any library.

You can see a good selection of them here.  You can also find the full current list at the Norton website. (more…)

Elizabeth Taylor and Sandy Dennis won Oscars. Richard Burton and George Segal were nominated. They all win Nighthawk Awards for the best film of 1966: Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf

My Top 20:

  1. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf
  2. A Man for All Seasons
  3. The Professionals
  4. Morgan
  5. Red Beard
  6. Hamlet
  7. The Fortune Cookie
  8. Alfie
  9. The Russians are Coming, The Russians are Coming
  10. Loves of a Blonde
  11. You’re a Big Boy Now
  12. The Shop on Main Street
  13. Cul-de-Sac
  14. Blow-Up
  15. Georgy Girl
  16. Le Bonheur
  17. A Man and a Woman
  18. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum
  19. 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse
  20. The Sleeping Car Murders (more…)

Laurence Olivier and Jean Simmons in the "Get thee to a nunnery" scene in Hamlet (1948)

The 21st Academy Awards, for the film year 1948.  The nominations were announced on February 10, 1949 and the awards were held on March 24, 1949.

Best Picture:  Hamlet

  • The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
  • The Red Shoes
  • Johnny Belinda
  • The Snake Pit

Most Surprising Omission:  The Search

Best Eligible Film Not Nominated:  Red River

Rank (out of 82) Among Best Picture Years:  #39

(more…)

My Top 10:

Tim Holt, Humphrey Bogart and Walter Huston in John Huston's brilliant 1948 film about greed: Treasure of the Sierra Madre

  1. Treasure of the Sierra Madre
  2. Hamlet
  3. Red River
  4. The Eagle Has Two Heads
  5. Fanny
  6. Macbeth
  7. Monsieur Vincent
  8. All My Sons
  9. Cesar
  10. The Search (more…)