That's the look of a man who has just realized he's gonna need a bigger boat.

That’s the look of a man who has just realized he’s gonna need a bigger boat.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category (or Globe, in the Globes section).  Films in blue were nominated.  Films with an asterisk (*) were Consensus nominees (a scale I put together based on the various awards) while those with a double asterisk (**) were the Consensus winners.

I’m listing the top 10 in the categories but only the top 5 earn Nighthawk nominations.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. Jaws  *
  2. Dog Day Afternoon  *
  3. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest  **
  4. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
  5. The Man Who Would Be King
  6. Amarcord
  7. Barry Lyndon  *
  8. Shampoo
  9. Three Days of the Condor
  10. The Sunshine Boys

(more…)

The love story is nice, but it's the music and dancing that make West Side Story the best film ever made out of a Broadway musical.

The love story is nice, but it’s the music and dancing that make West Side Story the best film ever made out of a Broadway musical.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category (or Globe, in the Globes section).  Films in blue were nominated.  Films with an asterisk (*) were Consensus nominees (a scale I put together based on the various awards) while those with a double asterisk (**) were the Consensus winners.

I’m listing the top 10 in the categories but only the top 5 earn Nighthawk nominations.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. West Side Story  **
  2. The Hustler  *
  3. La Dolce Vita
  4. One, Two, Three
  5. Breakfast at Tiffany’s
  6. Yojimbo
  7. The Bridge
  8. Elevator to the Gallows
  9. L’Avventura
  10. The Guns of Navarone  *

Analysis:  Though still a very solid Top 5, this is a significant drop from the last several years.  The Hustler is actually the weakest #2 film in 6 years and La Dolce Vita is the weakest #3 film in 16 years.  Ironically, though, because I have no point difference between my #3 and #7 films, The Bridge is the third best #7 film to date.  But, because of the strength of 1960 and because only the top 8 films here are ****, there is an incredible 28 point difference between the Top 10 of 1960 (avg: 94.5) and the Top 10 of 1961 (avg: 91.7). (more…)

Robert Altman on the set of Prairie Home Companion with his "standby director", Paul Thomas Anderson, who agreed to that role for insurance reasons.  In between is some actress.

Robert Altman (#33) on the set of Prairie Home Companion with his “standby director”, Paul Thomas Anderson (#28), who agreed to that role for insurance reasons. In between is some actress.

This is the penultimate ranked list of those directors who have been nominated for Best Director by the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences.  This is part 8 of the series, with one part still left to go.  As always, you can find the previous seven posts in this series by going here.  There is also an introduction here, which explains the scope of the project as well as my scoring system.  I have been focusing on finishing this series this year, both so that I go do the bi-annual update of the Top 100 Directors of All-Time and because I want to do it before another Oscar season and some more directors potentially end up needing to be ranked.

In a reversal of the last group, these are the more experienced directors.  With the exception of four Studio Era workhorses, the 25 directors in the last post had only averaged 7.76 films.  This time, we have seven directors (Lucas, Olivier, Coppola, Fosse, Malick, Mendes, Anderson) who have only directed a combined 39 films – an average of 5.57 (I’ve seen all but two of those – the two now out or about to be in theaters).  The other 18 directors have averaged 19.83 films – or if you cut out Lynch, Branagh and Leigh, you have 15 directors who have made 325 films (21.67 each), of which I have seen 308.  I have also seen 95.2% of these films – only missing more than one film by Renoir (4) and Capra (9).  And the only film I’m missing from both Truffaut and Malle are on TCM in the next month.  And this just about caps it for the less experienced directors.  The only director in the last post with fewer than 10 films to his credit is Tarantino.

The other demarcation point between this group and the final group is the number of great (****) films they have directed.  Of the final 25, only one has directed fewer than 5 great films – Francis Ford Coppola, at #25, and he’s got four.  Only four others have directed just five – Charlie Chaplin, Orson Welles (both of whom have smaller amounts of total films), Clint Eastwood and Elia Kazan.  But how many directors have directed more than five great films and aren’t in the top 25?  Just five – all of whom are here: Stephen Frears (which is how he ranks this high), Steven Soderbergh, Pedro Almodóvar, Frank Capra and Francois Truffaut.  They all have six great films.  All sixteen directors who directed more than six great films are in the final group. (more…)

the men at the Post: Dustin Hoffman, Robert Redford, Jason Robards, Jack Warden and Martin Balsam in All the President's Men (1976)

My Top 20:

  1. All the President’s Men
  2. Network
  3. Taxi Driver
  4. Solyaris
  5. The Outlaw Josey Wales
  6. Face to Face
  7. Carrie
  8. Seven Beauties
  9. The Front
  10. Voyage of the Damned
  11. Marathon Man
  12. Rocky
  13. Spirit of the Beehive
  14. Bound for Glory
  15. Cousin Cousine
  16. The Shootist
  17. Silver Streak
  18. The Last Tycoon
  19. Heart of Glass
  20. The Tenant (more…)

Jack Nicholson took home Best Actor. This is one of his quieter moments in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975).

The 48th annual Academy Awards, for the film year 1975.  The nominations were announced on February 17, 1976 and the awards were held on March 29, 1976.

Best Picture:  One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest

  • Jaws
  • Dog Day Afternoon
  • Barry Lyndon
  • Nashville

Most Surprising Omission:  Amarcord

Best Eligible Film Not Nominated:  Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Rank (out of 82) Among Best Picture Years:  #19

(more…)

"You're gonna need a bigger boat."

My Top 20:

  1. Jaws
  2. Dog Day Afternoon
  3. One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest
  4. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
  5. The Man Who Would Be King
  6. Korol Lir
  7. Amarcord
  8. Barry Lyndon
  9. The Sunshine Boys
  10. The Mystery of Kaspar Hauser
  11. Three Days of the Condor
  12. Shampoo
  13. Love and Death
  14. And Now My Love
  15. The French Connection II
  16. The Story of Adele H
  17. L’Invitation
  18. Day of the Locust
  19. The Great Waldo Pepper
  20. A Brief Vacation (more…)

Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway in Chinatown - the best film of 1974, or almost any year

My Top 20:

  1. Chinatown
  2. The Godfather Part II
  3. Day for Night
  4. The Conversation
  5. Scenes from a Marriage
  6. Badlands
  7. Young Frankenstein
  8. Blazing Saddles
  9. Don’t Look Now
  10. The Parallax View
  11. Lenny
  12. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia
  13. Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore
  14. Ali: Fear Eats the Soul
  15. Murder on the Orient Express
  16. The Phantom of Liberty
  17. Sanshiro Sugata
  18. Thieves Like Us
  19. The Front Page
  20. The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (more…)