A Century of Film


Mysteries


The Genre

 

“What about Film Noir?” Veronica asked me as I was talking about this category.  But, as I explained to her, Film Noir itself isn’t a genre, but a style that moves across multiple genres, usually Crime, Mystery and Suspense.  Crime films are easier to pull out because, as I explained in the Crime post, they are films in which the main character is a criminal.  It is a lot more difficult to draw a line between Crime films and Suspense films and you could easily take all of Mystery and make it a sub-section of Suspense films.  But I will try. (more…)

Hey!  You!

Hey! You!

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category.  Films in blue were nominated.  This year marks the addition of the supporting acting categories; there are 16 categories overall, though two of them (Assistant Director, Dance Direction) aren’t categories I include.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. Modern Times
  2. The Petrified Forest
  3. Mr. Deeds Goes to Town
  4. My Man Godfrey
  5. A Tale of Two Cities

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DUKE (to those remaining): You'd better stay where you are for a while.  Good night, folks.

DUKE (to those remaining): You’d better stay where you are for a while. Good night, folks.

My Top 7:

  1. The Petrified Forest
  2. Mr. Deeds Goes to Town
  3. My Man Godfrey
  4. A Tale of Two Cities
  5. Dodsworth
  6. After the Thin Man

Note:  The Petrified Forest would have won in 1935 but Deeds would have been in 5th place.  Notice there are also only 6 rather than 10 because there just isn’t as loaded a list of qualities scripts in 1936 (1937 won’t be any better).  I originally had Hitchcock’s Secret Agent here, but after rewatching it, it got bumped off the list.  Though, to be fair, this is a better list than you’ll find in Best Original Screenplay for 1936, where I can’t even manage to find a full slate of nominees.

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A nice quiet hangover moment in The Thin Man (1934).

A nice quiet hangover moment in The Thin Man (1934).

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category.  Films in blue were nominated.  We finally get to 12 categories this year with the addition of Editing, Original Score and Original Song.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. The Thin Man
  2. It Happened One Night
  3. Vampyr
  4. The Gay Divorcee
  5. Death Takes a Holiday

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the original Modern Library dust jacket for The Maltese Falcon

The Maltese Falcon

  • Author:  Dashiell Hammett  (1894  –  1961)
  • Rank:  #59
  • Published:  1930
  • Publisher:  Alfred A. Knopf
  • Pages:  217  (Vintage paperback)
  • First Line:  “Samuel Spade’s jaw was long and bony, his chin a jutting v under the more flexible v of his mouth.”
  • Last Lines:  “Spade, looking down at his desk, nodded almost imperceptibly.  ‘Yes,’ he said, and shivered.  ‘Well, send her in.’ “
  • ML Edition:  #45  (two dust jackets  –  1934, 1942)
  • Acclaim:  Modern Library Top 100 English Language Novels of the 20th Century  –  #56
  • Film:  1931 (**  –  dir. Roy Del Ruth), 1936 (**  –  as Satan Met a Lady, dir. William Dieterle), 1941  (****  –  #2 film of the year, #24 all-time, dir. John Huston)
  • First Read:  Spring, 1994 (more…)

The 7th Academy Awards, for the film year of 1934.  The nominations were announced on February 5, 1935 and the ceremony was held on February 27, 1935.

Gable and Colbert: both won Oscars for It Happened One Night (1934)

Best Picture:  It Happened One Night

  • The Thin Man
  • The Gay Divorcee
  • The Barretts of Wimpole Street
  • The White Parade
  • Imitation of Life
  • The House of Rothschild
  • Here Comes the Navy
  • One Night of Love
  • Viva Villa!
  • Flirtation Walk
  • Cleopatra

Most Surprising Omission:  Affairs of Cellini

Best Eligible Film Not Nominated:  Death Takes a Holiday

Rank (out of 82) Among Best Picture Years:  #79

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