Screen Shot 2022-04-02 at 7.29.48 AMThree parts left in the first 1000 (before the updates).  The introduction can be found here.  The preceding parts of the list can be found here. (more…)

Screen Shot 2021-10-03 at 7.34.48 AMThis is part something of this, I’ve lost track.  But you can find the original introduction here and by going here you can find all the other parts.  All of these films earn a 93 on a 100 point scale except The Commitments which is a 94 (which is a high **** while the rest are mid ****). The picture above wasn’t the easiest to decide on this time – I originally had Michael Caine images from three different films (in three different decades), there are two films with the same director and two stars, I could have gone with a different McKellen pic on the left to go with the one on the right or I could have done the other McKellen pic with another actor in the same role. (more…)

Screen Shot 2021-07-24 at 7.25.33 AMThis is the 11th part of the countdown of the Top 1000 Films of the first Century of Film (1912-2011).  The introduction can be found here.  Just click here to find the other parts.

All 50 of these films earns a 92 which is mid ****. (more…)

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This is the 9th part of the Top 1000 list.  The introduction can be found here.  Films #600-571 are a 90 and the rest are a 91 which are both low level ****. (more…)

Screen Shot 2020-11-14 at 12.02.51 PMAll 50 films in this post earn an 89 which is low ****.  The introduction to the entire list can be found here. (more…)

A Century of Film

The Golden Globes

I should probably start with the obvious: the Golden Globe Awards are a registered trademark of the HFPA (which is also trademarked).  I don’t have their permission to write any of this (and I don’t need it) and I don’t own any of the photos.  They are also a major part of the film industry, whether anyone likes it or not (and many people don’t for very good reasons).  They have been around for a long time and there is a lot that is odd but also some that is very good about them.  So I’ve compiled a post of various info, trivia and assorted little tidbits about the awards, organized by category. (more…)

First of all, it’s the best performance of the year and it’s from the best film of the year. Second of all, as a straight male, I provide enough for the straight males on this site and thought a picture for those who aren’t straight males would be a treat.

My Top 20

  1. Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood
  2. Little Women
  3. 1917
  4. Jojo Rabbit
  5. Pain and Glory
  6. Parasite
  7. Portrait of a Lady on Fire
  8. Knives Out
  9. Rocketman
  10. Marriage Story
  11. Toy Story 4
  12. Us
  13. Avengers: Endgame
  14. The Farewell
  15. The Irishman
  16. Ford v Ferrari
  17. Star Wars Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker
  18. The Man Who Killed don Quixote
  19. Dolemite is My Name
  20. Spider-Man: Far From Home

These are all **** films and they are all the **** films for the year (though I haven’t seen Les Miserables). (more…)

If you don’t know what is being said in this scene you are sadly deficient when it comes to the greatest Comedy film ever made.

A Century of Film


Comedies


The Genre

“As America’s principal purveyor of entertainment, Hollywood packaged comedy in many forms.  In 1929, Variety surveyed the major studios and classified production trends into seven categories.  Comedy was divided into two – comedy drama and comedy.  The types subsumed under comedy drama consisted of society, rural, city, mystery, college, and domestic, and the types under comedy consisted of farce and action-adventure.  A quarter of all the films produced by the majors in 1929 could be classified as comedies of one sort or another.  Although comic types metamorphosed into the sophisticated, low-life, anarchistic, sentimental, folksy, screwball, populist, or romantic, the production trend remained a key component of every studio’s roster.”  (Grand Design: Hollywood as a Modern Business Enterprise, 1930-1939, Tino Balio, p 256) (more…)

“He didn’t move.  Not until the elevator door began to close.  Then raised his hand.  He did – Karen positive now it was Foley – raised his hand to her as the door closed.”  (p 148)

My Top 10

  1. Out of Sight
  2. Gods and Monsters
  3. Primary Colors
  4. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
  5. Ringu
  6. Live Flesh
  7. A Simple Plan
  8. The Butcher Boy
  9. Character
  10. Apt Pupil

note:  A very strong Top 4 but then it starts to fall off badly.  The full list is long, though, and is listed down at the bottom except for my #16 (Little Voice) which is reviewed because of its BAFTA nomination. (more…)

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category (or Globe, in the Globes section).  Films in blue were nominated.  Films (or directors) in olive are links to earlier posts that I don’t want to have show up in blue and be mistaken for a nominee.  Films with an asterisk (*) were Consensus nominees (a scale I put together based on the various awards) while those with a double asterisk (**) were the Consensus winners.

I’m listing the top 15 in the categories but only the top 5 earn Nighthawk nominations.  I’m only going with the Top 15 because there are 15 **** films and several categories don’t even get that far.  It’s a weak year all around.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. Inglourious Basterds  *
  2. The Hurt Locker  **
  3. A Serious Man  *
  4. Up  *
  5. Broken Embraces
  6. An Education  *
  7. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
  8. Up in the Air  *
  9. A Single Man
  10. District 9  *
  11. The White Ribbon
  12. The Informant
  13. Sin Nombre
  14. Coraline
  15. Revanche

Analysis:  As mentioned above, I went with 15 films because that’s how many **** films there are in this year.  That the Oscars nominated seven of them (as well as my #16 film, Precious) speaks well of their first year with 10 nominees in 66 years. (more…)