This is the next batch of 50 films counting down my Top 1000 Films of All-Time.  Once again, they all earn an 86, which is high ***.5.  I recommend reading the introduction first.  The first batch of 50 were here. (more…)

If you don’t know what is being said in this scene you are sadly deficient when it comes to the greatest Comedy film ever made.

A Century of Film


Comedies


The Genre

“As America’s principal purveyor of entertainment, Hollywood packaged comedy in many forms.  In 1929, Variety surveyed the major studios and classified production trends into seven categories.  Comedy was divided into two – comedy drama and comedy.  The types subsumed under comedy drama consisted of society, rural, city, mystery, college, and domestic, and the types under comedy consisted of farce and action-adventure.  A quarter of all the films produced by the majors in 1929 could be classified as comedies of one sort or another.  Although comic types metamorphosed into the sophisticated, low-life, anarchistic, sentimental, folksy, screwball, populist, or romantic, the production trend remained a key component of every studio’s roster.”  (Grand Design: Hollywood as a Modern Business Enterprise, 1930-1939, Tino Balio, p 256) (more…)

Perhaps the greatest action film ever made.

Perhaps the greatest action film ever made.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category (or Globe, in the Globes section).  Films in blue were nominated.  Films with an asterisk (*) were Consensus nominees (a scale I put together based on the various awards) while those with a double asterisk (**) were the Consensus winners.

I’m listing 10 in each category because there are a strong Top 10 in most of the categories but only the top 5 make the nomination list (except for Actor).

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. Seven Samurai
  2. The Searchers
  3. The Killing
  4. Richard III  *
  5. The Ladykillers
  6. Forbidden Planet
  7. Diabolique
  8. Baby Doll
  9. La Strada
  10. Sawdust and Tinsel

(more…)

rashomon

There may be no truth. But there is one of the most brilliant films ever made.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category (or Globe, in the Globes section).  Films in blue were nominated.  Films with an asterisk (*) were Consensus nominees (a scale I put together based on the various awards) while those with a double asterisk (**) were the Consensus winners.

I’m going with a top 8 this time, even though only the top 5 in each category earn nominations .

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. Rashomon
  2. Singin’ in the Rain
  3. High Noon  **
  4. The Bad and the Beautiful
  5. The Lavender Hill Mob
  6. Miss Julie
  7. The Quiet Man  *
  8. Moulin Rouge  *

(more…)

ealingI came into these films backwards, the same way, in a sense, that I came to Hammer Horror.  And I owe my initial dive to the same source: Star Wars.

As I have said before, Star Wars was a film with an absolutely inspired casting.  To balance out the three relatively new faces in the main roles, Lucas brought in two British stalwarts, who happened to be the stars of two of the best series of films to ever come out of the island – The Hammer Horror films star Peter Cushing and the brilliant star of the best of the Ealing Comedies: Alec Guinness.  I would eventually go to the Hammer films because of my love for Dracula films.  But I came to Ealing because, after Star Wars, and all those David Lean films, Alec Guinness would eventually surpass Humphrey Bogart as my favorite actor of all-time.  And so naturally I went looking for his other films.  And was I ever surprised to discover that this brilliant dramatic actor had once been considered the finest comic actor in Britain.  And that opened up a whole new world of films for me: The Ealing Comedies. (more…)