A Century of Filmfantasia

Animated Film

Of all the categories that the Academy took too long to recognize (like Costume Design or Makeup), this is the most excusable.  It would not be until 1941 that there are even multiple feature length animated films, there aren’t five until 1970 and there aren’t really enough to justify a category until the early 80s.  The awards groups probably should have jumped on things earlier like the LAFC (1989) and Annies (1991) did but they didn’t wait way too long like they did with Costume Design and Makeup.

Animated Film, in some ways, is the most awkward of these posts.  It is an Oscar category and thus I classify it as a category but to many people it is also a genre (it is not – it is a form of film not an actually genre) which means I will address it in some of the ways that I have addressed genres as well.  For that matter, it is one of the three “Best Picture” categories, categories that treat the film as a whole and thus easier to classify the film on my point system rather than looking for one individual aspect.  To that extent, I will need to discuss how it works with studios and directors as well (the last being particularly tricky).

I rate all aspects of film on a 9 point scale.  They also correspond to the 100 point scale for Best Picture and 9 points is for 98-99, the very best of all-time.  There would not be a list for Animated Film – the top films of all-time all receive a 96 (and 8).  But, as mentioned above, since this is also kind of a genre as well as a category, I will make a list.  It’s down at the bottom because so much has changed since 2011, it seemed better to save it for the end and include all rather than do two different lists.

The FilmmakersWalt-Disney

Walt Disney

Walt never directed or wrote a feature film but his hands were all over Disney’s output for three decades.  He proved that feature length animated films were viable and that they were art.  It’s not a coincidence that when he died, Disney’s animated films declined for over two decades before they finally righted the ship.
Key Films:  Fantasia, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Bambi, Pinocchio

Hamilton Luske  /  Clyde Geronimi

Luske joined Disney in 1931, was made supervising animator of Snow White, was one of the two supervising directors of Pinocchio and then directed or co-directed the majority of the output of Disney until his death in 1968.  Geronomi also joined in 1931 and worked on several films before moving up to being director in 1948.  From 1950 to 1961, they handled all the Disney films (with Geronimi handling Sleeping Beauty without Luske).  Geronimi left Disney in 1959 and went to television but he still got credit on 101 Dalmations.
Key Films:  Fantasia, Pinocchio, Lady and the Tramp, Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty

Hayao Miyazaki

After working as an animator for studios for years and working in Manga, Miyazaki broke into feature film directing in 1979.  After the success of Nausicaa, he, Isao Takahata (also an acclaimed animated film director) and two others formed Studio Ghibli.  Since then, the Ghibli films have been the level to which all other animators aspire to.
Key Films:  Spirited Away, My Neighbor Totoro, Kiki’s Delivery Service

John Lassetter

Though Lassetter has been eclipsed by other directors at Pixar, his importance goes beyond just the films he has directed (which include the first two Pixar films).  He was at Pixar when it was still Lucasfilm Animation after getting fired from Disney and then he ended up back at Disney after the Pixar purchase running it all, giving him an immortal place as kind of the Walt Disney of computer animation.
Key Films:  Toy Story, Toy Story 2, Cars

The Academy Awards

Summary:

More can be found on the history of the category here.  However, more importantly, a full history of the race in every year can be found in the following links:

Directors:

See the list below.

Franchises:

Shrek 2 would be the first sequel to earn a nomination.  Technically Toy Story 3 would be the first to win but Wallace and Gromit is for all intents and purposes a sequel.  Through 2011, Kung Fu Panda 2 and Puss in Boots also earned noms (as had the original films).

Genres:

Most of the films are Kids (29 out of 39 nominees, 10 out of 11 winners).  Fantasy has the only other winner (Spirited Away) and half the non-Kids nominees.

Best Picture:

With the expansion in 2009 to 10 nominees, Up scored a nomination followed by Toy Story 3.

Foreign Films:

Seven films have been nominated through 2011 including the winning Spirited Away.  The first five were Miyazaki or SPC films but two GKIDS films earned noms in 2011, paving a new path.

Single Nominations:

Of the 39 films nominated through 2011 over half (25) earned no other nominations including four winners.

Other Categories:

Four categories have crossed over with Animated Film more than three times: Score, Sound Editing and Song (7 times each) and Original Screenplay (5 – all Pixar).  This is a function of Pixar.  Of the 39 films, as mentioned half earned no other nominations (none were Pixar).  The other 14 films include 8 Pixar films which account for all of the Original Screenplay and Sound Editing noms.  Only one Pixar film has had less than 3 noms and no non-Pixar films have had more than 3 noms.  Four films have won Oscars in other categories; all were Pixar.

The Academy Awards Top 5 Production Studios:

  1. Pixar  –  280
  2. DreamWorks  –  180
  3. Disney  –  100
  4. Studio Ghibili  –  60
  5. Nickelodeon  –  60

note:  Wins are worth 40 points and nominations are worth 20.

Top 3 Oscar Winners:

  1. Spirited Away
  2. Wall-E
  3. Ratatouille

Weakest 3 Oscar Winners:

  1. Happy Feet
  2. Shrek
  3. Rango

Worst 3 Oscar Nominees:

  1. Shark Tale
  2. A Cat in Paris
  3. Treasure Planet

Top 3 Oscar Years:

  1. 2005  (Wallace and Gromit, Corpse Bride, Howl’s Moving Castle)
  2. 2010  (Toy Story 3, How to Train Your Dragon, Illusionist)
  3. 2003  (Finding Nemo, Triplets of Belleville, Brother Bear)

Top 3 Oscars Years by Oscar Score:

  1. 2005  –  100  (Wallace and Gromit, Corpse Bride, Howl’s Moving Castle)
  2. 2001  –  100  (Shrek, Monsters Inc, Jimmy Neutron)
  3. 2002  –  100  (Spirited Away, Lilo & Stitch, Ice Age, Spirit, Treasure Planet)

note:  The difference between this list and the previous one is that the first one is a flat total based on my 9 point scale.  In this one, it’s comparing my top five films to the ones the Oscars actually nominated.  So, in the first one, it’s how good are the nominees.  In this one it’s how good are the nominees compared to what else was eligible.

Worst 3 Oscar Years:

  1. 2011  (Rango, Puss in Boots, Kung Fu Panda, Chico & Rita, Cat in Paris)
  2. 2002  (Spirited Away, Lilo & Stitch, Ice Age, Spirit, Treasure Planet)
  3. 2004  (Happy Feet, Monster House, Cars)

Worst 3 Oscars Years by Oscar Score:

  1. 2011  –  35.7  (Rango, Puss in Boots, Kung Fu Panda, Chico & Rita, Cat in Paris)
  2. 2010  –  69.2  (All About Eve, Born Yesterday, Magnificent Yankee)
  3. 2006  –  71.4  (Happy Feet, Monster House, Cars)

The BAFTA Awards

Summary:

The BAFTAs were late in coming to Animated Films, not just as a category (begun in 2006, the same year as the Globes) but in general.  While Beauty and the Beast was the first animated film nominated for Picture at the Oscars, unless you count Roger Rabbit it was the first animated film nominated for anything at the BAFTAs.  It took until 1982 for the BAFTAs to nominate any Disney film (and that was Tron).  Until 2000, the only nominations for Animated Films were for Score (3) or Visual Effects (5) with one nomination for Sound for Lion King.  But the arrival of Animated Films in Britain (Chicken Run) found a British Film nomination, the same that would happen for Wallace and Gromit in 2005.  But really, the most respect an Animated Film would get prior to 2006 would be Shrek with 6 nominations including Picture and a win for Adapted Screenplay.

Then in 2006 came the category which is too short a time to bother with any of the lists I would normally do.  Only Happy Feet is a weak winner and no nominee has earned below a 70 (not good enough to be a Nighthawk nominee but not bad enough to complain).  They have yet to disagree with the Consensus or the Oscars.  Half the nominees have earned at least one other nomination including four of the six winners.  Shrek the Third is the only nominee not to be nominated by at least two other groups.

The Golden Globes

Summary:

Like the BAFTAs, late on the ball, finally establishing an award in 2006 and then not giving it five nominees until 2009.  I talk more about what the Globes have done in the Animated Film piece here.

As for Animated Films before the category, the results were mixed.  No fully Animated Film earned a nomination until 1986 even though the Globes had a Song category (yes, they failed to nominate “Bare Necessities”).  The first two Animated Films to earn nominations (American Tail, Oliver & Company) earned Song noms but Little Mermaid changed everything.  It won Score, won Song and earned a nomination for Picture – Comedy / Musical, a pattern followed by Beauty and the Beast (which won Picture), Aladdin and Lion King (which won Picture).  Until 2000, every Animated film nominee was nominated for Song except for three which were nominated for Score.  But starting in 2000 with Chicken Run, four Animated films would earn Picture noms in five years without a single Song nomination (Shrek, Finding Nemo, Incredibles).  Then they finally established an Animated Film award, making such films ineligible for Best Picture.

The Broadcast Film Critics Awards  (Critics Choice)

Summary:

The BFCA was actually pretty early on this, far earlier than any of the other awards groups, starting in 1998.  That year there was a tie between Prince of Egypt and A Bug’s Life, setting up the DreamWorks / Disney rivalry that win would every award until 2011 (when Paramount would win).  The BFCA has never gone out on a limb with every post-2000 winner (after there were more groups) winning at least three other awards and after the Oscars began every BFCA winner won the Oscar except Cars.  Only three films have earned a BFCA nom with no other noms (Polar Express, Beowulf, Madagascar 2).

The Annies

Summary:

The Annies rank with the MPSE as the only guilds to begin awards before the category existed as an Academy Award.  The Annies long pre-dated the Oscars, beginning in 1992.  However, they bizarrely decided not to work on the calendar year for their awards, at least until 2003.  This meant, not only that films like Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, Toy Story and Toy Story 2 were competing in different years from the rest of their awards but that Lion King would win over Nightmare Before Christmas, Toy Story 2 would win over Chicken Run and Monsters Inc, instead of losing to Shrek, would lose to Spirited Away.

But the Annies and their oddities haven’t ended there.  They have been more determined to spread the wealth with five nominees before the Oscars even began and then adding more and more nominees as years have gone on.

Then there is the DreamWorks mess of 2008.  If you prefer Kung Fu Panda to Wall-E, fine, but you’re in the minority.  But to have it win the Annie because DreamWorks bought voting memberships for all of its employees and deny Wall-E a perfect sweep, well that’s messed up.  Then in 2010, the Annies still were the odd ones out, choosing to reward How to Train Your Dragon instead of Toy Story 3, its only win and a choice of a film with no other wins over a film so good it earned regular Best Picture nominations from both the Oscars and PGA.

The Producers Guild Awards

Summary:

The PGA came along late, starting in 2005 but they had the double excuse that the Annies already existed as a guild to award Animated films and that they had nominated both Shrek and The Incredibles in the previous few years.  But in 2005 they created a separate award just for Animated Films.  But, unlike the Globes, they didn’t make Animated films ineligible for their regular award and Up and Toy Story 3 made that leap.  Like other groups, the PGA doesn’t get original much.  Five of their seven winners won the Oscar (and Consensus) and the two that didn’t came in second at the Consensus.  Of the 29 total films nominated, 25 earned an Annie nom (and one of the ones that didn’t, Flushed Away, earned other noms) leaving only Robots, Ice Age 2 and 9 to be blanked by other groups.

The Critics

Summary:

Kudos to the LAFC for being the first group at all (not just among the critics) to give out a Best Animated Film award, starting with The Little Mermaid in 1989 two years before the Annies began their own awards.  Except for 1991 when the NBR decided that Beauty and the Beast deserved an award, the LAFC were the only critics group giving the award until 1999.  The NYFC began in 1999, the NBR in 2000, the BSFC in 2003 (though they then stopped until 2007) and the CFC in 2007 while the NSFC still doesn’t give one.

Beauty and the Beast was the first to win two awards, Chicken Run the first to win three (in the first year there were three) and Wall-E the first to win four.  No film has swept all five but there’s a couple of footnotes to that.  First, Chicken Run, Spirited Away and The Incredibles swept all three before the BSFC and CFC began.  Second, Rango won four but the NYFC didn’t give an award that year.  Third, and most importantly, Wall-E won four awards but the LAFC didn’t give it the award because they gave it Best Picture instead (as opposed to BSFC and CFC which gave it Picture and Animated Film).  Waltz with Bashir is notable for winning Picture from the NSFC (in the same year as Wall-E).

The Nighthawk Awards

note:  Because my awards go, retroactively, all the way back through 1912, there are a lot more nominees and winners than in the other awards.  But I don’t always have a full slate of nominees and some years I don’t have any nominees.

Franchises:

Toy Story 3 is the first sequel to win the Nighthawk although Curse of the Were-Rabbit is kind of a sequel.  Several others have earned nominations starting with Toy Story 2.

Genres:

Yes, it’s mostly Kids.  Of the 43 winners through 2011, 35 are Kids films.  But there are four Fantasy films (three of those being Miyazaki films), two Adventure (both Tintin films), a Comedy and a Drama.  Of the 88 nominees, 58 of them are Kids, followed by Fantasy (11), Drama (7) and Sci-Fi (5).

Best Picture:

Roger Rabbit is the only Picture winner.  Another 9 films earn nominations, though they are in groups with three early (Snow White, Fantasia, Bambi), only two between 1942 and 2002 (Watership Down, Beauty and the Beast) and then four more recently (Spirited Away, Ratatouille, Wall-E, Up).

Foreign Film:

There are 25 Foreign films that have earned Animated Film nominations.  Of those, 16 were nominated for Foreign Film.  Three films won both awards (Nausicaa, Totoro, Mononoke), all of which are Miyazaki films and four others win Animated Film.

Single Nominations:

Only 30 of the 88 films earn the one nomination which isn’t bad.  Of those 30, six win Animated Film (Fox and the Hound, Secret of Nimh, James and the Giant Peach, Chicken Run, Wallace and Gromit, Flushed Away), three of those being films I almost push to a low ***.5 to have them win and the other three being Aardman films without original songs.

Other Categories:

I mention songs above because 34 of the 58 films with another nomination earn a Song nomination, by far the biggest overlap.  Next is Foreign Film with 16 overlapping noms followed by Score with 15.  Only five films earn nominations other than Song, Foreign or Score (Fantasia, Winnie the Pooh, Roger Rabbit, Incredibles, Sky Captain).

Directors:

If you have trouble recognizing three of the top four names it’s because they are all long-time Disney directors who overlapped with each other (most Disney films have multiple directors).

My Top 10

  1. Hamilton Luske  –  300
  2. Hayao Miyazaki  –  280
  3. Clyde Geronimi  –  280
  4. Wolfgang Reitherman  –  160
  5. Jack Kinney  –  100
  6. John Lassetter  –  100
  7. Brad Bird  –  100
  8. Lee Unkrich  –  100
  9. eight directors  –  80

My Top 5 Production Companies

  1. Disney  –  1040
  2. Pixar  –  380
  3. Studio Ghibli  –  360
  4. Aardman  –  140
  5. DreamWorks  –  140

Weakest 5 Films to win the Nighthawk:

  1. James and the Giant Peach
  2. The Fox and the Hound
  3. Saludos Amigos
  4. The Aristocats
  5. The Secret of Nimh

note:  I’ll admit that in all five of these films, which are barely reaching ***.5, I feel a need to push them to that point to get an Animated Film.  Maybe they really deserve the spot, maybe they don’t.  It’s hard for me to separate that in my head.

Top 5 Films That Don’t Win the Nighthawk:

  1. The Nightmare Before Christmas
  2. Toy Story 2
  3. Tangled
  4. Corpse Bride
  5. Persepolis

The Nighthawk Winners:

  • 1937:  Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
  • 1940:  Pinocchio
  • 1941:  Fantasia
  • 1942:  Bambi
  • 1943:  Saludos Amigos
  • 1947:  Crab with the Golden Claws
  • 1948:  Melody Time
  • 1950:  Cinderella
  • 1951:  Alice in Wonderland
  • 1953:  Peter Pan
  • 1955:  Lady and the Tramp
  • 1959:  Sleeping Beauty
  • 1961:  101 Dalmations
  • 1963:  The Sword in the Stone
  • 1967:  The Jungle Book
  • 1970:  The Aristocats
  • 1977:  The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  • 1981:  The Fox and the Hound
  • 1982:  The Secret of Nimh
  • 1985:  Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
  • 1988:  Who Framed Roger Rabbit
  • 1989:  The Little Mermaid  (LAFC)
  • 1991:  Beauty and the Beast  (Annie, LAFC, NBR)
  • 1992:  Aladdin  (Annie, LAFC)
  • 1993:  My Neighbor Totoro
  • 1994:  Grave of the Fireflies
  • 1995:  Toy Story  (Annie, LAFC)
  • 1996:  James and the Giant Peach
  • 1998:  Kiki’s Delivery Service
  • 1999:  Princess Mononoke
  • 2000:  Chicken Run  (Annie, BFCA, NYFC, LAFC, NBR)
  • 2001:  Monsters Inc.  (AA, Annie, BFCA)
  • 2002:  Spirited Away  (AA, Annie, BFCA, NYFC, LAFC, NBR)
  • 2003:  Finding Nemo  (AA, Annie, BFCA, NBR)
  • 2004:  The Incredibles  (AA, Annie, BFCA, NYFC, LAFC, NBR)
  • 2005:  Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were-Rabbit  (AA, Annie, PGA, BFCA, LAFC)
  • 2006:  Flushed Away  (PGA, BAFTA, BFCA)
  • 2007:  Ratatouille  (AA, Annie, PGA, BAFTA, GG, BFCA, LAFC, CFC, NBR)
  • 2008:  Wall-E  (AA, Annie, PGA, BAFTA, GG, BFCA, NYFC, LAFC (Picture), BSFC, CFC, NBR)
  • 2009:  Up  (AA, Annie, PGA, BAFTA, GG, BFCA, BSFC, CFC, NBR)
  • 2010:  Toy Story 3  (AA, Annie, PGA, BAFTA, GG, BFCA, LAFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR)
  • 2011:  The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn  (Annie, PGA, GG, BAFTA, BFCA)

Consensus Awardswalle-n-eve

Most Awards (not including the Nighthawk):

  • Wall-E  (Oscar, PGA, BAFTA, GG, BFCA, NYFC, LAFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR)
  • Ratatouille  (Oscar, Annie, PGA, BAFTA, GG, BFCA, LAFC, CFC, NBR)
  • Up  (Oscar, Annie, PGA, BAFTA, GG, BFCA, BSFC, CFC, NBR)
  • Toy Story 3  (Oscar, PGA, BAFTA, GG, BFCA, LAFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR)
  • Rango  (Oscar, Annie, BAFTA, BFCA, NBR, LAFC, BSFC, CFC)

Wall-E didn’t actually win Best Animated Film at the LAFC but it won Best Picture instead.  That makes it the only film to win 10 awards and like with Best Foreign Film, I include that as an award.  But it was kept from a complete sweep by the Annie controversy (see above).  Toy Story 3 won four of the five critics and also had an Annie controversy.  Ratatouille and Up swept the six awards groups and won three of the five critics.  Rango one-upped them with four critics awards (in a weaker year) but lost both the PGA and Globe (deservedly, in my opinion, to Tintin).

Two films actually had what can be considered a clean sweep, winning the three exisiting awards groups and the three existing critics awards at a time before the PGA, Globes, BAFTA, BSFC or CFC began their awards:

  • Spirited Away
  • The Incredibles

Consensus Chart

note:  The chart below I imported from Excel and I hope it isn’t too confusing.  It’s about as big as I could make to still have it fit.  Unlike many of the other categories, there is generally a pretty solid consensus on the winner each year.  Through 2011, no Oscar or BFCA winner has ever failed to win the Consensus and every winner has at least 4 wins and the last one with less than 8 was in 2006.  That was also the last year any film but the winner earned at least 25% of the points.

YEAR FILM AA Ani PGA GG BFT BFC crit RT WT N W % R
1989 Little Mermaid             40 40 40 1 1 100.00% 1
1990 Rescuers Down Under             40 40 40 1 1 100.00% 1
1991 Beauty and the Beast   40         72 112 112 3 3 100.00% 1
1992 Aladdin   40         40 80 80 2 2 66.67% 1
1992 Bebe’s Kids   20           20 20 1 0 16.67% 2
1992 Ferngully   20           20 20 1 0 16.67% 2
1993 Mighty River             40 40 40 1 1 40.00% 1
1993 Little Nemo   20           20 20 1 0 20.00% 2
1993 Once Upon a Forest   20           20 20 1 0 20.00% 2
1993 Nightmare Before Christmas   20           20 20 1 0 20.00% 2
1994 Lion King   40         40 80 80 2 2 80.00% 1
1994 Batman: Mask of the Phantasm   20           20 20 1 0 20.00% 2
1995 Toy Story   40         40 80 80 2 2 57.14% 1
1995 Goofy Movie   20           20 20 1 0 14.29% 2
1995 Pocahontas   20           20 20 1 0 14.29% 2
1995 Swan Princess   20           20 20 1 0 14.29% 2
1996 Close Shave             40 40 40 1 1 66.67% 1
1996 Space Jam   20           20 20 1 0 33.33% 2
1997 Hercules   20         40 60 60 2 1 37.50% 1
1997 Spirit of Christmas             40 40 40 1 1 25.00% 2
1997 Cats Don’t Dance   40           40 40 1 1 25.00% 2
1997 Anastasia   20           20 20 1 0 12.50% 4
1998 Bug’s Life   20       40 40 100 92 3 2 41.07% 1
1998 Prince of Egypt   20       40   60 52 2 1 23.21% 2
1998 Mulan   40           40 40 1 1 17.86% 3
1998 I Married a Strange Person   20           20 20 1 0 8.93% 4
1998 Quest for Camelot   20           20 20 1 0 8.93% 4
1999 Iron Giant   40         40 80 80 2 2 31.75% 1
1999 Toy Story 2   40       40   80 72 2 2 28.57% 2
1999 South Park   20         40 60 60 2 1 23.81% 3
1999 Tarzan   20           20 20 1 0 7.94% 4
1999 Titan AE   20           20 20 1 0 7.94% 4
2000 Chicken Run   20       40 112 172 164 5 4 73.21% 1
2000 Road to El Dorado   20           20 20 1 0 8.93% 2
2000 Fantasia 2000   20           20 20 1 0 8.93% 2
2000 Emperor’s New Groove   20           20 20 1 0 8.93% 2
2001 Shrek 40 40       40 72 192 184 5 5 51.69% 1
2001 Waking Life           20 40 60 56 2 1 15.73% 2
2001 Monsters Inc 20 20       20   60 56 3 0 15.73% 2
2001 Blood   20           20 20 1 0 5.62% 4
2001 Osmosis Jones   20           20 20 1 0 5.62% 4
2001 Jimmy Neutron 20             20 20 1 0 5.62% 4
2002 Spirited Away 40 40       40 112 232 224 6 6 54.37% 1
2002 Ice Age 20 20       20   60 56 3 0 13.59% 2
2002 Lilo and Stitch 20 20       20   60 56 3 0 13.59% 2
2002 Spirit 20 20       20   60 56 3 0 13.59% 2
2002 Treasure Planet 20             20 20 1 0 4.85% 5
2003 Finding Nemo 40 40       40 32 152 144 4 4 38.30% 1
2003 Triplets of Belleville 20 20       20 80 140 136 5 2 36.17% 2
2003 Brother Bear 20 20       20   60 56 3 0 14.89% 3
2003 Looney Tunes: Back in Action   20           20 20 1 0 5.32% 4
2003 Millenium Actress   20           20 20 1 0 5.32% 4
2004 Incredibles 40 40       40 112 232 224 6 6 62.92% 1
2004 Shrek 2 20 20       20   60 56 3 0 15.73% 2
2004 Ghost in the Shell 2   20           20 20 1 0 5.62% 3
2004 Spongebob Squarepants Movie   20           20 20 1 0 5.62% 3
2004 Shark Tale 20             20 20 1 0 5.62% 3
2004 Polar Express           20   20 16 1 0 4.49% x
2005 Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were-Rabbit 40 40 40     40 40 200 192 5 5 36.36% 1
2005 Corpse Bride 20 20 20     20 32 112 108 5 1 20.45% 2
2005 Howl’s Moving Castle 20 20       20 40 100 96 4 1 18.18% 3
2005 Madagascar   20 20     20   60 56 3 0 10.61% 4
2005 Chicken Little   20 20     20   60 56 3 0 10.61% 4
2005 Robots     20         20 20 1 0 3.79% x
2006 Happy Feet 40 20 20 20 40 20 80 240 232 8 4 34.52% 1
2006 Cars 20 40 40 40 20 40 32 232 216 7 5 32.14% 2
2006 Monster House 20 20 20 20   20   100 92 5 0 13.69% 3
2006 Flushed Away     20   20 20   60 56 3 0 8.33% 4
2006 Over the Hedge   20       20   40 36 2 0 5.36% 5
2006 Open Season   20           20 20 1 0 2.98% x
2006 Ice Age 2     20         20 20 1 0 2.98% x
2007 Ratatouille 40 40 40 40 40 40 104 344 328 9 9 45.30% 1
2007 Persepolis 20 20     20 20 80 160 156 6 2 21.55% 2
2007 Simpsons Movie   20 20 20 20 20   100 92 5 0 12.71% 3
2007 Bee Movie   20 20 20   20   80 72 4 0 9.94% 4
2007 Surf’s Up 20 20           40 40 2 0 5.52% 5
2007 Shrek the Third         20     20 20 1 0 2.76% x
2007 Beowulf           20   20 16 1 0 2.21% x
2008 Wall-E 40 20 40 40 40 40 180 400 384 11 10 53.33% 1
2008 Kung Fu Panda 20 40 20 20   20   120 112 5 1 15.56% 2
2008 Waltz with Bashir   20     20 20 40 100 96 4 1 13.33% 3
2008 Bolt 20 20 20 20   20   100 92 5 0 12.78% 4
2008 $9.99   20           20 20 1 0 2.78% 5
2008 Madagascar 2           20   20 16 1 0 2.22% x
2009 Up 40 40 40 40 40 40 100 340 324 9 9 38.94% 1
2009 Fantastic Mr Fox 20 20 20 20 20 20 80 200 192 8 2 23.08% 2
2009 Coraline 20 20 20 20 20 20   120 112 6 0 13.46% 3
2009 Princess and the Frog 20 20 20 20   20   100 92 5 0 11.06% 4
2009 Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs   20   20   20   60 52 3 0 6.25% 5
2009 Secret of Kells 20 20           40 40 2 0 4.81% x
2009 9     20         20 20 1 0 2.40% x
2010 Toy Story 3 40 20 40 40 40 40 140 360 344 10 9 46.99% 1
2010 How to Train Your Dragon 20 40 20 20 20 20   140 132 6 1 18.03% 2
2010 Illusionist 20 20   20   20 40 120 112 5 1 15.30% 3
2010 Despicable Me   20 20 20 20 20   100 92 5 0 12.57% 4
2010 Tangled   20   20   20   60 52 3 0 7.10% 5
2011 Rango 40 40 20 20 40 40 140 340 328 10 8 37.61% 1
2011 Adventures of Tintin   20 40 40 20 20   140 128 5 2 14.68% 2
2011 Puss in Boots 20 20 20 20   20   100 92 5 0 10.55% 3
2011 Kung Fu Panda 2 20 20 20     20   80 76 4 0 8.72% 4
2011 Arthur Christmas   20   20 20 20   80 72 4 0 8.26% 5
2011 Cars 2   20 20 20       60 56 3 0 6.42% x
2011 Cat in Paris 20 20           40 40 2 0 4.59% x
2011 Chico & Rita 20 20           40 40 2 0 4.59% x
2011 Arrugas   20           20 20 1 0 2.29% x
2011 Rio   20           20 20 1 0 2.29% x

Lists

  • Average Nighthawk Winner  (100 point scale):  87.2
  • Average Oscar Winner  (100 point scale):  90.6
  • Average Nighthawk 2nd Place  (100 point scale):  84.3
  • Average Nighthawk Nominee  (100 point scale):  85.1
  • Average Oscar Nominee  (100 point scale):  79.6
  • Total Oscar Score:  79.50
  • Average Oscar Winner Rank:  1.27
  • Average Oscar Winner Rank Among Nominees:  1.09

Since 2011miyazaki

Oscar Notes:  Franchises haven’t necessarily done as well with Monster University, Frozen 2 and the highly regarded Finding Dory not nominated and Incredibles 2 not winning.  But Despicable Me 2 did become the first sequel to earn a nom when the original didn’t, Toy Story 4 did win and both How to Train Your Dragon sequels earned noms.  Kids still dominates (35 of 45 nominees, 8 of 9 winners) with Fantasy again having half the other nominees but this time the other winner is Action (Spider-Man).  Weaker groups of Animated films in 2011 and 2012 combined with dropping Picture to an undetermined number of nominees seemed to have made voters decide that they didn’t need to vote for Animated Films anymore which is why a film like Inside Out wasn’t nominated for Best Picture in spite of being way better than several of the nominees.  We’ll have to see if the new change back to 10 nominees affects that in the future.  Other than Miyazaki’s The Wind Rises, all the Foreign nominees (five films) have been from GKIDS until I Lost My Body in 2019 (from Netflix).

Top 5 Production Studios:

  1. Pixar  –  500
  2. Disney  –  280
  3. DreamWorks  –  260
  4. Studio Ghibli  –  140
  5. Laika  –  100

BAFTA Notes:  Since 2011, the winners have all been great (except Klaus) and the nominees have all been 71 or higher so it’s even better than before 2011.  The big difference is that after 2011 only three nominees have earned any other noms (Inside Out – Screenplay; Isle of Dogs – Score; Soul – Score, Sound).  Only thrice have they not awarded the Consensus Winner (Brave, Kubo, Klaus) and the first time they agreed with the Oscar.  With only three nominees (as opposed to most groups five), the BAFTAs usually nominate along with everyone else.  Only Klaus (3 noms but 2 wins) and Minions (2 noms) have less than 4 total noms.

Globe Notes:  More can be found in the Animated Film section here, including the oddity of Missing Link winning given the box office.  Most winners win the Consensus (all but three since 2011) and most earn an Oscar nom (34 out of 44 since 2011).  Only Sing and Lion King failed to earn additional noms.

BFCA Notes:  They continue to mostly go along with the other groups (even though they are generally second behind the Annies in announcing).  They did break with the Oscar winners in 2012 and 2014 but only two films since 2011 have failed to receive any other noms (Madagascar 3, Trolls) and the only other two films that didn’t receive Annie noms received PGA noms.

Annie Notes:  In 2015, after several years of ever-changing numbers of nominees, the Annies finally made an “Independent” category.  What that means though is that they spread the wealth even more.  It’s a mixed bag.  It means they nominate weak films like Cars 3, Trolls World Tour and Early Man to get the full slate for non-indies but it also means that films like Big Bad Fox, Buñuel in the Labyrinth of Turtles and Weathering with You get nominations when no one else gives them one.  Also, after passing over Toy Story 3, they also passed over Toy Story 4, this time for the much weaker Klaus.

PGA Notes:  Like the BFCA, all but two post-2011 winners have won the Oscar and it was the same two as the BFCA that didn’t (Wreck-It-Ralph, LEGO Movie).  Since 2011, only Epic, Secret Life of Pets and Abominable have failed to earn any other nominations outside the PGA.

Critics Notes:  Still no film has swept all five groups.  Three films have won four awards since 2011 and all three (Wind Rises, Inside Out, Coco) lost the LAFC.  The LAFC has been very independent minded with only one of their last seven winners being a big studio production (Spider-Verse).

Nighthawk Notes:

Top 10 Points:

  1. Hayao Miyazaki  –  320
  2. Hamilton Luske  –  300
  3. Clyde Geronimi  –  280
  4. Wolfgang Reitherman  –  160
  5. Lee Unkrich  –  140
  6. Pete Docter  –  120
  7. Ron Clements  –  120
  8. John Musker  –  120
  9. Brad Bird  –  120
  10. Jack Kinney  /  John Lassetter  /  Andrew Stanton  –  100

My Top 5 Production Companies

  1. Disney  –  1220
  2. Pixar  –  600
  3. Studio Ghibli  –  440
  4. Aardman  –  180
  5. DreamWorks  –  180

The Nighthawk Winners:

  • 2012:  Brave  (Oscar, GG, BAFTA, Annie, PGA, BFCA)
  • 2013:  The Wind Rises  (NYFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR, Oscar, Annie, GG, BFCA)
  • 2014:  Jack and the Cuckoo-Clock Heart
  • 2015:  Inside Out  (Oscar, Annie, PGA, GG, BFCA, BAFTA, NYFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR)
  • 2016:  Moana  (Oscar, Annie, PGA, GG, BFCA, BAFTA)
  • 2017:  Coco  (Oscar, Annie, PGA, GG, BFCA, BAFTA, NYFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR)
  • 2018:  Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse  (Oscar, Annie, PGA, GG, BFCA, BAFTA, NYFC, LAFC, CFC)
  • 2019:  Toy Story 4  (Oscar, PGA, BFCA, CFC, Annie, GG, BAFTA)
  • 2020:  Soul  (Oscar, PGA, BAFTA, BFCA, Annie, Globe, NBR)

Chart / Consensus Notes:

Since 2011, two films won 10 awards, sweeping the six awards groups and winning four of the five critics awards (in both cases losing the LAFC):

  • Inside Out
  • Coco

Since 2011, the Consensus hasn’t been quite as clear with Frankenweenie only winning three awards and two Oscar winners not winning the Consensus (and one Consensus winner failing to even earn an Oscar nom).  In 2013, with Wind Rises taking the critics and Frozen the awards groups, for the first time since 2006, the Oscar actually decided the winner.  In 2019, we had the lowest percentage ever (by a considerable amount) for a Consensus winner.  Also, while no year prior to 2012 ever had more than three films win an award, three of the eight years here had four films and two of them (2016, 2019) had five.

YEAR FILM AA Ani PGA GG BFT BFC crit RT WT N W % R
2012 Frankenweenie 20 20 20 20 20 20 116 236 228 9 3 25.68% 1
2012 Wreck-It-Ralph 20 40 40 20   40 32 192 180 6 4 20.27% 2
2012 Brave 40 20 20 40 40 20   180 168 6 3 18.92% 3
2012 Paranorman 20 20 20   20 20 32 132 128 6 1 14.41% 4
2012 Rise of the Guardians   20 20 20   20   80 72 4 0 8.11% 5
2012 Pirates: Band of Misfits 20 20           40 40 2 0 4.50% x
2012 Hotel Transylvania   20   20       40 36 2 0 4.05% x
2012 Rabbi’s Cat   20           20 20 1 0 2.25% x
2012 Madagascar 3           20   20 16 1 0 1.80% x
2013 Frozen 40 40 40 40 40 40   240 224 6 6 26.79% 1
2013 Wind Rises 20 20   20   20 140 220 212 8 4 25.36% 2
2013 Despicable Me 2 20 20 20 20 20 20   120 112 6 0 13.40% 3
2013 Croods 20 20 20 20   20   100 92 5 0 11.00% 4
2013 Ernest & Celestine 20 20         40 80 80 3 1 9.57% 5
2013 Monsters University   20 20   20 20   80 76 4 0 9.09% x
2013 A Letter to Momo   20           20 20 1 0 2.39% x
2013 Epic     20         20 20 1 0 2.39% x
2014 LEGO Movie   20 40 20 40 40 72 232 220 7 5 25.23% 1
2014 How To Train Your Dragon 2 20 40 20 40   20 32 172 160 6 3 18.35% 2
2014 Big Hero 6 40 20 20 20 20 20   140 132 6 1 15.14% 3
2014 Tale of the Princess Kaguya 20 20         76 116 116 4 2 13.30% 4
2014 Boxtrolls 20 20 20 20 20 20   120 112 6 0 12.84% 5
2014 Book of Life   20 20 20   20   80 72 4 0 8.26% x
2014 Song of the Sea 20 20           40 40 2 0 4.59% x
2014 Cheatin   20           20 20 1 0 2.29% x
2015 Inside Out 40 40 40 40 40 40 140 380 364 10 10 38.40% 1
2015 Anomalisa 20 20 20 20   20 76 176 168 7 2 17.72% 2
2015 Shaun the Sheep the Movie 20 20   20 20 20   100 92 5 0 9.70% 3
2015 Peanuts Movie   20 20 20   20   80 72 4 0 7.59% 4
2015 Good Dinosaur   20 20 20   20   80 72 4 0 7.59% 4
2015 Boy and the World 20 40           60 60 2 1 6.33% x
2015 When Marnie Was There 20 20           40 40 2 0 4.22% x
2015 Minions     20   20     40 40 2 0 4.22% x
2015 Prophet   20           20 20 1 0 2.11% x
2015 Boy and the Beast   20           20 20 1 0 2.11% x
2016 Zootopia 40 40 40 40 20 40 40 260 244 7 6 24.70% 1
2016 Kubo and the Two Strings 20 20 20 20 40 20 64 204 196 8 3 19.84% 2
2016 Moana 20 20 20 20 20 20   120 112 6 0 11.34% 3
2016 Red Turtle 20 40       20   80 76 3 1 7.69% 4
2016 Finding Dory   20 20   20 20   80 76 4 0 7.69% 4
2016 My Life as a Zucchini 20 20   20 20     80 76 4 0 7.69% x
2016 Your Name   20         40 60 60 2 1 6.07% x
2016 Tower             36 36 36 1 1 3.64% x
2016 Kung Fu Panda 3   20           20 20 1 0 2.02% x
2016 Long Way North   20           20 20 1 0 2.02% x
2016 Miss Hokusai   20           20 20 1 0 2.02% x
2016 Secret Life of Pets     20         20 20 1 0 2.02% x
2016 Trolls           20   20 16 1 0 1.62% x
2016 Sing       20       20 16 1 0 1.62% x
2017 Coco 40 40 40 40 40 40 140 380 364 10 10 39.91% 1
2017 Breadwinner 20 40   20   20 40 140 132 5 2 14.47% 2
2017 Loving Vincent 20 20   20 20 20   100 92 5 0 10.09% 3
2017 Boss Baby 20 20 20 20       80 76 4 0 8.33% 4
2017 Despicable Me 3   20 20     20   60 56 3 0 6.14% 5
2017 Ferdinand 20   20 20       60 56 3 0 6.14% 5
2017 LEGO Batman Movie     20     20   40 36 2 0 3.95% x
2017 Cars 3   20           20 20 1 0 2.19% x
2017 Captain Underpants   20           20 20 1 0 2.19% x
2017 In This Corner of the World   20           20 20 1 0 2.19% x
2017 Napping Princess   20           20 20 1 0 2.19% x
2017 Big Bad Fox & Other Tales   20           20 20 1 0 2.19% x
2018 Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse 40 40 40 40 40 40 112 352 336 9 9 35.44% 1
2018 Isle of Dogs 20 20 20 20 20 20 36 156 148 7 1 15.61% 2
2018 Incredibles 2 20 20 20 20 20 20 32 152 144 7 1 15.19% 3
2018 Mirai 20 40   20   20   100 92 4 1 9.70% 5
2018 Ralph Breaks the Internet 20 20 20 20   20   100 92 5 0 9.70% 4
2018 Grinch     20     20   40 36 2 0 3.80% x
2018 Ce Magnifique Gateau   20           20 20 1 0 2.11% x
2018 MFKZ   20           20 20 1 0 2.11% x
2018 Ruben Brandt, Collector   20           20 20 1 0 2.11% x
2018 Tito and the Birds   20           20 20 1 0 2.11% x
2018 Early Man   20           20 20 1 0 2.11% x
2019 Toy Story 4 40 20 40 20 20 40 32 212 200 7 4 21.46% 1
2019 I Lost My Body 20 40       20 116 196 192 6 4 20.60% 2
2019 How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World 20 20 20 20   20 32 132 124 6 1 13.30% 3
2019 Missing Link 20 20 20 40   20   120 108 5 1 11.59% 4
2019 Klaus 20 40     40     100 100 3 2 10.73% 5
2019 Frozen II   20 20 20 20 20   100 92 5 0 9.87% x
2019 Bunuel in the Labyrinth of the Turtles   20           20 20 1 0 2.15% x
2019 Okko’s Inn   20           20 20 1 0 2.15% x
2019 Promare   20           20 20 1 0 2.15% x
2019 Weathering with You   20           20 20 1 0 2.15% x
2019 Abominable     20         20 20 1 0 2.15% x
2019 Lion King       20       20 16 1 0 1.72% x
2020 Soul 40 40 40 40 40 40 32 272 256 7 7 26.34% 1
2020 Wolfwalkers 20 40 20 20 20 20 116 256 248 9 4 25.51% 2
2020 Onward 20 20 20 20 20 20   120 112 6 0 11.52% 3
2020 Shaun the Sheep Movie, A: Farmageddon 20 20     20 20   80 76 4 0 7.82% 4
2020 Over the Moon 20   20 20   20   80 72 4 0 7.41% 5
2020 Croods, The: A New Age   20 20 20       60 56 3 0 5.76% x
2020 Wolf House, The             36 36 36 1 1 3.70% x
2020 Willoughbys, The   20       20   40 36 1 0 3.70% x
2020 On-Gaku: Our Sound   20           20 20 1 0 2.06% x
2020 Ride Your Wave   20           20 20 1 0 2.06% x
2020 Calamity Jane   20           20 20 1 0 2.06% x
2020 Trolls World Tour   20           20 20 1 0 2.06% x

The Top 100 Animated Films of All-Time

  1. Fantasia
  2. Spirited Away
  3. Wall-E
  4. Bambi
  5. Who Framed Roger Rabbit
  6. Beauty and the Beast
  7. Inside Out
  8. Pinocchio
  9. Coco
  10. Ratatouille
  11. The Little Mermaid
  12. Up
  13. My Neighbor Totoro
  14. The Incredibles
  15. Finding Nemo
  16. The Wind Rises
  17. Moana
  18. Princess Mononoke
  19. Grave of the Fireflies
  20. Toy Story 4
  21. Nightmare Before Christmas
  22. Finding Dory
  23. Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Were-Rabbit
  24. Your Name
  25. Watership Down
  26. Toy Story 3
  27. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
  28. The Incredibles 2
  29. Aladdin
  30. Soul
  31. Toy Story 2
  32. Zootopia
  33. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
  34. Lady and the Tramp
  35. The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn
  36. Sleeping Beauty
  37. Toy Story
  38. Brave
  39. Tangled
  40. Corpse Bride
  41. Persepolis
  42. Frozen
  43. The Triplets of Belleville
  44. Kubo and the Two Strings
  45. Jack and the Cuckoo-Clock Heart
  46. A Letter to Momo
  47. Chicken Run
  48. Tokyo Godfathers
  49. Lilo and Stitch
  50. Coraline
  51. Monsters Inc.
  52. Castle in the Sky
  53. Shrek 2
  54. The Lion King
  55. Wreck-it-Ralph
  56. The LEGO Movie
  57. The Big Bad Fox and Other Tales
    ***.5
  58. Cinderella
  59. Frankenweenie
  60. Ralph Breaks the Internet
  61. Whisper of the Heart
  62. Rango
  63. Millennium Actress
  64. The Night is Short, Walk on Girl
  65. Howl’s Moving Castle
  66. Mirai
  67. Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow
  68. When Marnie Was There
  69. The Peanuts Movie
  70. Fantastic Mr. Fox
  71. How to Train Your Dragon
  72. Arthur Christmas
  73. Frozen II
  74. Monsters University
  75. A Whisker Away
  76. The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  77. Ernest and Celestine
  78. Shrek
  79. South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut
  80. Big Hero 6
  81. Anomalisa
  82. Shaun the Sheep Movie
  83. Abominable
  84. Onward
  85. Wolfwalkers
  86. The Breadwinner
  87. Dumbo
  88. Kiki’s Delivery Service
  89. The Boxtrolls
  90. Flushed Away
  91. How to Train Your Dragon 2
  92. Despicable Me
  93. Fantasia 2000
  94. Buñuel in the Labyrinth of the Turtles
  95. The Secret World of Arietty
  96. Only Yesterday
  97. Waltz with Bashir
  98. The Jungle Book
  99. The Tale of the Princess Kaguya
  100. The Iron Giant

The 10 Worst Animated Films of All-Time

(the worst being #10)

  1. My Little Pony: The Movie
  2. Space Dogs
  3. Adam Sandler’s Eight Crazy Nights
  4. Monkeybone
  5. Romeo and Juliet: Sealed with a Kiss
  6. Regular Show: The Movie
  7. Son of Alladin
  8. Smurfs 2
  9. The Smurfs
  10. Doogal

Box Officehttps___blogs-images.forbes.com_scottmendelson_files_2018_06_banner-1200x674

Box office for Animated films is an interesting subject.  The early Disney films are looked at as box office success, the highest grossing films of the 40s but that wasn’t actually true at the time.  Snow White is listed as one of the biggest films ever, when adjusted for inflation but by 1948, when Variety begins their annual lists, it’s just 10th all-time and it drops out of the Top 10 in 1950.  It wouldn’t have rentals above $10 million (gross around $22 million or so) until after its 1963 re-release and wouldn’t really jump up until the 1976, 1983 and 1987 re-releases.  Peter Pan was briefly in the all-time Top 20 in rentals but dropped out and Lady and the Tramp wouldn’t make $10 million in rentals until 1972.  If we were to cut the Animated Film list in 1976, the last year before BOM begins their annual lists, the all-time rentals look like this (roughly times 2.2 to figure out the gross):

  1. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs  –  $26.5 mil  (#36)
  2. Bambi  –  $17.8 mil  (#78)
  3. Peter Pan  –  $16.0 mil  (#91)
  4. 101 Dalmations  –  $14.0 mil  (#118)
  5. Pinocchio  –  $13.0 mil  (#123)
  6. The Jungle Book  –  $13.0 mil  (#125)
  7. Song of the South  –  $12.8 mil  (#127)
  8. Lady and the Tramp  –  $12.7 mil  (#128)
  9. The Aristocats  –  $11.4 mil  (#150)
  10. Cinderella  –  $11.2 mil  (#154)

Now, let’s take a look at what Box Office Mojo claims is the box office for the Top 10 Animated Films through 1976 (total figures minus any later re-releases that BOM lists):

  1. The Jungle Book  –  $73.7 mil  (#25)
  2. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs  –  $66.5 mil  (#27)
  3. Fantasia  –  $42.8 mil  (#59)
  4. Peter Pan  –  $40.7 mil  (#65)
  5. Bambi  –  $40.2 mil  (#67)
  6. Pinocchio  –  $38.9 mil  (#72)
  7. Sleeping Beauty  –  $36.4 mil  (#80)
  8. Lady and the Tramp  –  $36.3 mil  (#81)
  9. 101 Dalmations  –  $32.0 mil  (#91)
  10. Cinderella  –  $31.0 mil  (#92)

Not only are those numbers far higher than the standard 2.2 multiplier, but the ranks are way out of proportion for what Variety was reporting every single year.  But no matter which list you believe, the fact is that Animated films weren’t big business.  Yes, they made money and they continually added to that with re-releases over the years, but they weren’t blockbusters.  In 1987, Snow White became (according to BOM), the first Animated film to pass $100 million but it was the 53rd film all-time to do so and it took several re-releases (including a big one in 1987 after much inflation) to do so.  When Who Framed Roger Rabbit came out the following year, it was the first Animated film to gross $100 in its initial release (and beat out Snow White, which would pass it again in 1993 with its next re-release).  It was also the first one to make the Top 10 for its year of release since 1970.  But then came the Disney Renaissance.  The Little Mermaid finished at #13, Beauty and the Beast became the first fully animated film to break $100 million, Aladdin became the highest grossing film of 1992 and the first one to break $200 million and then The Lion King changed everything.  Prior to 1993, the last time an Animated Film had been in the All-Time Top 20 was back in 1974 (and even that’s debatable, depending on the source).  But The Lion King ended up as the fourth highest grossing film of all-time and stayed in the Top 10 through 2003.  By the time it finally was bounced out, it was only the third highest grossing Animated film behind Shrek 2 and Finding Nemo.  A good way to look at how much thing have changed is to look at this list of the top-grossing Animated Film for each year starting in 1977 and look at how they ranked in each year:

Year Rk FILM STU GROSS
1977 15 The Rescuers Disney $29,000,000
1978 16 The Lord of the Rings United Artists $30,471,420
1980 103 Bon Voyage Charlie Brown Paramount $2,013,193
1981 14 The Fox and the Hound Disney $39,900,000
1982 52 The Secret of NIMH MGM $14,665,733
1983 64 The Smurfs and the Magic Flute Atl $11,234,220
1985 40 The Care Bears Movie Samuel Goldwyn Company $22,934,622
1986 16 An American Tail Universal $47,483,002
1988 2 Who Framed Roger Rabbit Disney $156,452,370
1989 13 The Little Mermaid Disney $84,355,863
1990 42 The Rescuers Down Under Disney $27,931,461
1991 3 Beauty and the Beast Disney $145,863,363
1992 1 Aladdin Disney $217,350,219
1993 27 The Nightmare Before Christmas Disney $50,003,043
1994 2 The Lion King Disney $312,855,561
1995 1 Toy Story Disney $191,796,233
1996 15 The Hunchback of Notre Dame Disney $100,138,851
1997 17 Hercules Disney $99,112,101
1998 4 A Bug’s Life Disney $162,798,565
1999 3 Toy Story 2 Disney $245,852,179
2000 11 Dinosaur Disney $137,748,063
2001 3 Shrek DW $267,665,011
2002 9 Ice Age Fox (20th Century-Fox) $176,387,405
2003 2 Finding Nemo Disney $339,714,978
2004 1 Shrek 2 DW $441,226,247
2005 9 Madagascar DW $193,595,521
2006 3 Cars Disney $244,082,982
2007 2 Shrek the Third DreamWorks (Paramount) $322,719,944
2008 5 WALL-E Disney $223,808,164
2009 5 Up Disney $293,004,164
2010 1 Toy Story 3 Disney $415,004,880
2011 8 Cars 2 Disney $191,452,396
2012 8 Brave Disney $237,283,207
2013 3 Frozen Disney $400,738,009
2014 5 The LEGO Movie WB $257,760,692
2015 4 Inside Out Disney $356,461,711
2016 2 Finding Dory Disney $486,295,561
2017 9 Despicable Me 3 Universal $264,624,300
2018 3 Incredibles 2 Disney $608,581,744
2019 4 Frozen II Disney $477,373,461

As is obvious, Animated Films are now very big business and not just for Disney (though still mostly for Disney).  Here’s the list of all-time Top 10 in 2011 where my Century of Film originally cuts off:

  1. Shrek 2  –  $441.2 mil
  2. Toy Story 3  –  $415.0 mil
  3. Finding Nemo  –  $339.7 mil
  4. Shrek the Third  –  $322.7 mil
  5. The Lion King  –  $312.8 mil
  6. Up  –  $293.0 mil
  7. Shrek  –  $267.6 mil
  8. The Incredibles  –  $261.4 mil
  9. Monsters, Inc.  –  $255.8 mil
  10. Despicable Me  –  $251.5 mil

But, after less than a decade, here’s the all-time list now, almost completely re-written.

  1. Incredibles 2  –  $608.5 mil
  2. Finding Dory  –  $486.2 mil
  3. Frozen II  –  $477.3 mil
  4. Shrek 2  –  $441.2 mil
  5. Toy Story 4  –  $434.0 mil
  6. The Lion King  –  $422.7 mil
  7. Toy Story 3  –  $415.0 mil
  8. Frozen  –  $400.7 mil
  9. Finding Nemo  –  $380.8 mil
  10. The Secret Life of Pets  –  $368.3 mil

I will also note that there are four more films on this list before you get to Shrek the Third.