Sorry, Greta. Kathryn Bigelow knows how you feel.  Plus, you made history in other ways.

Well, I only got four categories completely correct in my predictions but they were major ones (Picture, Adapted Screenplay, Actress, Supporting Actress).  Sadly, I didn’t get Director, thinking the Academy would embrace Greta Gerwig’s triumph rather than Todd Phillips’ appalling nihilism (to spare questions in the comments, I think Joker is a bad film for reasons that will eventually be posted in the review, so please don’t ask, but have to do with its quality rather than its idiotic use of the Batman mythos and its wholesale nihilism).  Well, this is the same branch of morons who passed over Christopher Nolan when he did Batman right, Nolan again, Kathryn Bigelow when she won the Consensus and Ben Affleck when he won everything else.  So, let’s bypass the quality of the films for now and move on to the trivia.

  • Joker leads the way with 11.  Which, if they had nominated Nolan for the three nominations he deserved in 2008 would have been what he got.
  • The nine Best Picture nominees have a combined 69 nominations, tying 1939 and 2010 for the most ever.  And since those two years had 10 nominees, this year, in a sense, is the most ever (though several years in the 5 BP Era averaged more per nominee).
  • This year we have four nominees with 10 or more nominations.  This has never happened before.  In fact, the only years with even three nominees were both in the 5 BP Era (1964, 1977).
  • The nine Picture nominees are also the nine top films at the Consensus Awards for the fourth straight year.
  • For the first time in three years only one Picture nominee was released before October.
  • Joker becomes the first film nominated for Picture, Director and writing since Return of the King to earn over $200 million domestically.
  • Joker has 11 noms (#9 at the box office) while Hollywood has 10 (#18).  The other 18 films in the Top 20 have 11 combined nominations.
  • For the first time since 1990, Robert De Niro is in two Best Picture nominees and its his 10th and 11th nominees.
  • It’s the fifth time this decade Leo has been in a Best Picture nominee.  Given that he’s only been in eight films this decade, that’s pretty damn good.
  • It’s the third year in a row Sam Rockwell is in a Best Picture nominee.
  • Since (and including) 2007, Meryl Streep has earned seven acting nominations (but not one this year) and one of those films has earned a Best Picture nomination (The Post).  Since (and including) 2007, Saoirse Ronan has earned four acting nominations and all of them have earned Best Picture nominations.  For the record, by the way, Ronan is 25 or three years younger than Streep when she made her film debut.
  • Disney released nine feature films this year.  They grossed a combined $3.78 billion just in the States.  They earned a combined 9 nominations.  Since Disney completed the Fox purchase at the end of March, Fox has released 12 films (either through the regular studio or Fox Searchlight) and they only combined for $427 million.  But both Fox branches have a Best Picture nominee (Ferrari, Jojo) and they have a combined 12 nominations.
  • For the 14th year in a row, Fox (either through itself or through Searchlight) has a Best Picture nominee the longest streak since MGM’s streak of 18 years was broken in 1947.
  • Although Warners has had a Best Picture nominee almost every year, Joker is the first Warners film to earn Picture, Director and Screenplay noms since Michael Clayton in 2007.
  • After a six year break with no Picture nominees, Columbia has two (Hollywood, Little Women).  The last time they had a nomination they also had two (American Hustle, Captain Phillips).  If Hollywood wins, it will be Columbia’s first win since 1987.
  • On the other hand, after going 17 years between wins, 1917 gives Universal a serious chance for its first ever back-to-back wins.
  • This is the first year since 2012 that there are five films nominated for Picture, Director and writing.
  • Marriage Story is the 14th film nominated for Picture, writing, Actor, Actress and a supporting performance but not DIrector.  Before last year, it hadn’t happened since 2001.  But this makes consecutive years now, thanks to A Star is Born last year.
  • With nominations for Irishman and Richard Jewell we continue the streak of a Spielberg, Scorsese or Eastwood film getting nominated that has continued since 2008 (none of them made a film in 2007).
  • Marty earns his ninth Oscar nomination and his sixth this century.  That gives him 450 points (because of his win) and he ties Billy Wilder for 2nd place all-time.
  • He’s got more noms than the others combined: 3 (Tarantino), 2 (Mendes – but has a win) and 1 each for Bong Joon-ho and Phillips.
  • Jon Favreau is apparently the new Spielberg.  He’s had four films nominated for Oscars and all of them were nominated for Visual Effects.  In fact, all of them were nominated only for Visual Effects.
  • The Adapted Screenplay Consensus list is really easy.  It’s the first time in six years all five nominees have at least four nominations (all have WGA, BAFTA and BFCA noms except Two Popes which had a Globe nom).
  • The nomination for Screenplay for 1917 shouldn’t have been a surprise since after all, it’s the 17th Screenplay since 1984 (when the WGA adopted its current system) to earn a nomination with only the WGA as a precursor.  But, of the previous 16 films only two, Jerry Maguire and Dallas Buyers Club, earned Picture noms and none earned Picture and Director noms so it was a surprise.
  • Tarantino moves into a tie for 15th all-time in writing points with 240.  If he wins he moves into a tie for 10th place.
  • It’s the first time since 2005 that every one of the Original Screenplay nominees was at least co-written by the director.
  • In all, eight directors are nominated for writing.  The only Best Picture nominee with a writing nomination without the director nominated is The Irishman.
  • Quentin is the only repeat Oscar nominee in writing and directing.  Phillips has been nominated before for writing and Mendes for directing (this is Mendes’ first writing credit).
  • So it’s Frozen II that gets passed over for Animated Film.  What the fuck?
  • That makes it the third film in a year with five nominees to earn the five precursors and get passed over.  In all three cases (Tintin and The LEGO Movie were the other two), I think the Academy botched it.
  • But it’s the first time since 2012 that GKIDS doesn’t have a nominee.
  • Laika does continue its perfect streak for nominations, going 5 for 5.
  • In Best Actor, the nominees are 36 (nominated last year), an actor who is 45 and just three weeks younger than me (former winner), an actor who is 45 and just four days younger than me (fourth nomination) and two first time nominees who are 59 and 72.
  • The five Actor nominees average 51 1/2 years old.  Or a year older than the oldest Actress nominee.  But a lot younger then the Supporting Actor nominees who average 71 1/2.
  • Supporting Actress has quite a range.  Kathy Bates is old enough to be Laura Dern’s mother and Dern is almost old enough to be ScarJo’s mother and is definitely old enough to be Margot Robbie’s mother.  Hell, in Little Women, Laura Dern actually plays Florence Pugh’s mother.
  • Supporting Actor has four former Oscar winners, or as many as the other three acting categories combined.
  • Jonathan Pryce is the first Actor nominee since 2014 without a SAG or BFCA nom.
  • On the flip side, Taron Edgerton joins Tom Hanks in 2013 and Jake Gyllenhaal in 2014 as the only actors with SAG, BAFTA and Globe noms to not earn an Oscar nom.
  • With a nomination for Cynthia Erivo, the Oscars just barely escaped OscarsSoWhite.
  • But it also means the nominees matched the Globe – Drama nominees 5/5.  The last time that happened was 1995 and they had different winners.
  • ScarJo (I do this because it’s easier than spelling her last name) is the ninth actress total and sixth since Jessica Lange in 1982 to earn two nominations at the same Oscars.  However, she’s the first since Lange to do it without ever having earned an Oscar nomination before.
  • Lupita Nyong’o has the sixth most Consensus points for an Actress snub ever and the most since Sally Hawkins in 2008.
  • Al Pacino earned four straight nominations (72-75) and eight in 21 years.  Today, after a 27 year gap, he earned his ninth.
  • Those nine nominations means he only trails Nicholson, Tracy, Olivier and Newman.
  • All five of the Supporting Actor nominees have been nominated before (multiple times) but it’s been 29, 27, 22, 19 and 8 years since their last nominations.
  • In 2011, 2013, 2015 and 2017, Tom Hanks was in Best Picture nominees but didn’t earn an Oscar nom.  This year he’s nominated but his film isn’t.
  • While Supporting Actress has often embraced those with no precursors (three nominees this decade), Kathy Bates is the first to parlay a Globe nom (but no SAG, BAFTA or BFCA nom) into an Oscar nom since 1999.
  • On the flip side of that, Jennifer Lopez becomes just the fifth Supporting Actress to earn SAG, Globe and BFCA noms but not an Oscar nom, joining Cameron Diaz, Mila Kunis, Helen Mirren and Hong Chau.
  • While four of the nominated actresses are earning at least their third nomination, none have 200 Oscar points as of yet (though a win for Renee – again, last name is a pain to write – would put her there), among the males, Hopkins has 200, Leo has 240, Hanks has 275 and Pacino has 330.
  • This is the first time since 2003 that the female acting nominees did not include Meryl Streep, Cate Blanchett or Amy Adams.
  • Greta Gerwig may not have been nominated for Best Director today but she made history in other ways.  First, she joins Kathryn Bigelow as the only female directors with multiple Best Picture nominations.  Second, with Saorise Ronan’s nomination, Gerwig becomes just the second female director to direct multiple Best Actress performances (Niki Caro did it with Whale Rider and North Country) but the first to do it with the same actress.  What’s more, Gerwig became the first female director ever have multiple films earn multiple acting nominations.
  • With 1917 passed over for Editing and Joker (surprisingly, especially given its haul and the quality of the sets) snubbed for Production Design, it’s the second year in a row that no film has earned the big five Tech nominations.
  • How strange is 1917 getting passed for editing in terms of its other nominations?  It joins Inception as the only films in history to be nominated for Cinematography, Score, Sound, Art Direction (Production Design), Visual Effects and Sound Editing but not Editing.
  • Joker, on the other hand, is nominated for Picture, Director, Costume Design and Makeup but not Production Design.  How many films have ever had that combination?  Just one before today.  Braveheart.
  • Thelma Schoonmaker (Marty’s editor) ties Michael Kahn (Spielberg’s editor) for first all-time with 275 points.
  • Kudos to F.T. for predicting the cinematographers branch would ignore Ford1917 is now first in the Consensus and is a pretty sure winner.
  • In spite of 15 nominations now for Roger Deakins and 10 now for Robert Richardson, this is just the second time (after 2012) that the two have competed against each other for Cinematography.
  • Randy Newman moves into 22nd with 225 points for Score (9 noms, no wins).  His cousin Thomas moves into a tie for 11th with 350 points (14 noms, no wins).  This is the first time since 1995 they have competed with each other.
  • Alexandre Desplat moves into 14th place with 325 points (11 noms, two wins).
  • All three of them combined have 900 points.  Or 325 fewer points than John Williams who earned his sixth nomination today just for Star Wars films.
  • The only year since 1992 that none of those four earned a nomination was 2007.
  • This is the 15th time that Williams has competed against at least one of those other three in this category.
  • Stuart Wilson has a good chance to win the Oscar for Sound Mixing for 1917 which would be nice for him since he’s already been nominated and lost five previous times this decade.
  • Gary Rydstrom won four Oscars in the 90’s for Sound Mixing.  Today (for Ad Astra) he earned his fifth nomination this decade.  In between he went the entire decade of the 00’s without a nomination.
  • Wylie Stateman earned his fourth Sound Editing nom this decade (for Hollywood) and his ninth overall but will probably still not have an Oscar after this year.
  • For only the third time in the Expanded BP Era, two Picture nominees are nominated for Visual Effects.
  • But they are just the first two films nominated for Picture, Director, writing and Visual Effects since 2012 and it’s the first time two films were ever nominated for all four of those awards in the same year.
  • Before 2012 (the year Disney began releasing MCU films), they had earned 17 Oscar nominations and five Oscars in almost 60 years in the Visual Effects category.  From 2012 through this year, the studio has earned 17 nominations (including three this year for the third time in four years) but only one win.
  • Sandy Powell earns her 15th Oscar nomination for Costume Design.  She stays in 4th place with 270 points but a win would tie her for third.  This is her fourth nomination working with Marty (including a win).
  • Rocketman joins American Hustle, I Tonya and Bohemian Rhapsody as shortlisted for the Oscar for Makeup, nominated by the MUASG, BAFTA and BFCA and not earning an Oscar nom.
  • Sadly, I predicted the nomination for the terrible Dianne Warren song from Breakthrough.  To not even longlist “Beautiful Ghosts” or nominate “Speechless”, especially given the context of the latter song in the film says that the Music branch has crap taste.
  • Thankfully Warren will probably continue to be winless.  She has 11 nominations and is up to 13th place.  But that’s below Randy Newman who now has 13 nominations.  Plus, she’s up against three former Oscar winners (Newman, Elton John, the Lopez’s).
  • Cynthia Erivo earns a nomination for Best Song, making her the second actress in a row to earn Actress and Song nominations in the same year.
  • South Korea (astoundingly) earns its first nomination, North Macedonia its second, Poland its twelfth, Spain its 20th (and first in 15 years) and France its 38th.
  • That makes this the first time since 2004 that four of the nominees are from Europe.  It’s the first time since 1994 (the previous time North Macedonia was nominated) that the Balkans and Eastern Europe both have nominees.
  • This is the first time since 1979 that France and Poland have competed against each other even though this is Poland’s sixth nomination since then and France’s 19th.
  • Parasite has 6 total nominations, tied for third most for a Foreign Film.  It’s only the eighth nominated for Editing and the second nominated for both Editing and Production Design.
  • Pain and Glory is the first film since 2010 to be nominated for Actor and Foreign Film, just the second since 1998 and only the seventh ever.
  • A total of 34 films earned nominations, one more than last year but still the second fewest of the expanded BP Era.
  • The Two Popes has 105 points.  That’s the most points on nomination morning (without the winner’s points) for a film with no guild nominations since 1994 (Red) and the most for an English language film since 1986 (Crimes of the Heart), long before the SAG Awards existed.
  • Uncut Gems has 397 total awards points (with no chance to get more).  That’s the most points for a film with no Oscar noms since Casino Royale in 2006 and the second most since Drugstore Cowboy in 1989.
  • From 2015 to 2018, Netflix submitted 66 films to the Oscars, three of which earned a combined 17 Oscar nominations.  This year, Netflix submitted 31 films, five of which earned a combined 21 Oscar nominations.
  • Disney may have only managed 9 nominations but they have most nominated films (6) for a consecutive year and the sixth time in eight years.