A Century of Film


1994


The Awards

A quick note about the BAFTAs.  Their eligibility is based on the release of films in Britain so some Oscar eligible films are eligible in 1995 instead.  If they earn nominations or win awards in 1995, it will be a note after the BAFTA list in that category.

A second quick note about the Consensus awards because there are awards listed down below that are not taken into consideration for the Consensus awards.  Except for Director (see note below), I don’t consider festivals, critics runner-up, the Indie Spirits or my own Nighthawk Awards when I calculate the Consensus awards.

Best Picture

Consensus

  1. Pulp Fiction  –  545 pts
  2. Forrest Gump  –  400 pts
  3. Quiz Show  –  285 pts
  4. Four Weddings and a Funeral  –  235 pts
  5. The Shawshank Redemption  –  95 pts

In sixth place was Hoop Dreams with 90 points.  This was the second year in a row and the second of four times in five years that the Consensus matched the Oscars.  Gump tied Dances with Wolves‘ records of 4 wins, 5 noms and 400 points for the second place finisher.

Academy Awards

  • Forrest Gump
  • Four Weddings and a Funeral
  • Pulp Fiction
  • Quiz Show
  • The Shawshank Redemption

Not much surprise here.  Gump was an unstoppable juggernaut and was an example of the popular movie (Dances with Wolves, Titanic) winning over the big critics film (GoodFellas, Pulp Fiction, L.A. Confidential).  In my full coverage of the race here, I listed Bullets over Broadway as the most surprising omission but that’s only based on its success at the Oscars; after all, it was just the 16th film to earn 7 nominations (or more) without a Picture nom and of the other 15 only two others had earned Director and Screenplay noms (Hud, They Shoot Horses).  But nothing before the Oscars indicated that – it wasn’t Globe nommed for Picture or Director and the Oscar noms include all the DGA and PGA noms, and all the Globe nominees for Screenplay.  These were the expected nominees and they were all nominated.  The Oscar Score is 77.5, the highest since 1982 and it won’t be matched again until 2001.  Among Oscar picture years it ranks at #3 all-time (winners don’t effect the score) and easily the best to this date, beating out 1973.  It’s notable as well that all the Best Picture nominees have at least an 80 on metacritic.

Critics

  • NYFC:  Quiz Show
    • Pulp Fiction
  • LAFC:  Pulp Fiction
    • Heavenly Creatures
  • NSFC:  Pulp Fiction
    • Red  (2nd place)
    • Hoop Dreams  (3rd place)
  • BSFC:  Pulp Fiction
    • Ed Wood
    • Vanya on 42nd Street
  • CFC:  Hoop Dreams
    • Forrest Gump
    • Pulp Fiction
    • Quiz Show
    • The Shawshank Redemption
  • NBR:  Pulp Fiction  /  Forrest Gump
    • Bullets over Broadway
    • Ed Wood
    • Four Weddings and a Funeral
    • Heavenly Creatures
    • The Madness of King George
    • Nobody’s Fool
    • Quiz Show
    • The Shawshank Redemption
    • Tom & Viv

As partial evidence that the Oscars were pretty easy to pick, this was the first time in five years that all five eventual Oscar nominees were on the the NBR’s Top 10 list (which had 11 this year, presumably because of the two winners).  Pulp Fiction‘s four wins was actually a little low for this period.  In 1990, GoodFellas had become the first to win five, then Silence of the Lambs won four in 1991 and then in 1993 Schindler’s List became the first film to win all six.  Still, it was only the fourth film to win four awards and only 12 films have done it as of 2018.  The the NBR gave the tie to Gump is less surprising than that it didn’t just give it the award outright since it was the only group to give Picture to Dances instead of GoodFellas.  According to Tom O’Neill’s book Movie Awards, Pulp was actually in first place on the 1st ballot at the NYFC but Quiz Show, which had no votes on the 1st ballot started catching up and the two were forced into a run-off on the 5th ballot (Hoop Dreams was in 3rd by that point) that gave the win to Quiz Show.

Festivals

  • Cannes Palme d’Or:  Pulp Fiction
  • Cannes Grand Prize:  To Live  /  Burnt by the Sun
  • Venice Golden Lion:  Before the Rain  /  Vive l’Amour
  • Toronto People’s Choice Award:  Priest
  • Berlin Silver Bear:  Strawberry and Chocolate
  • Sundance Grand Jury Prize:  What Happened Was…
  • Sundance Audience Award:  Spanking the Monkey

Priest would be Oscar eligible in 1995.  Vive l’Amour wouldn’t get a US release until 1996.  Strawberry and Chocolate and Before the Rain would be Oscar nominated for Foreign Film and Burnt by the Sun would win the Oscar but the three wouldn’t get a U.S. release until 1995.  The Golden Bear in Berlin went to In the Name of the Father which is from 1993.

PGA

  • Forrest Gump
  • Four Weddings and a Funeral
  • Pulp Fiction
  • Quiz Show
  • The Shawshank Redemption

It’s the third year in a row that the PGA matches the Oscars 5/5.  It would not happen again during the 5 BP Era.  Because the PGA would expand their nominees in 1995, this is the only year the PGA and DGA would line up 5/5.

BAFTA

  • Four Weddings and a Funeral
  • Forrest Gump
  • Pulp Fiction
  • Quiz Show

The Madness of King George wins in 1995.  This was the first time since 1982 when all of the BAFTA nominees were also Oscar nominees (though in that year they were split between two different Oscar years) though it has happened several times since.

BAFTA (British Film)

  • Shallow Grave
  • Backbeat
  • Bhaji on the Beach
  • Priest

The Madness of King George wins in 1995.  Priest would be eligible in 1995.  Raining Stones and Tom & Viv (both eligible in this year) were nominated in 1993.  Tom & Viv would be the worst nominee in this category until We Need to Talk About Kevin in 2011.

Golden Globes

Drama

  • Forrest Gump
  • Legends of the Fall
  • Nell
  • Pulp Fiction
  • Quiz Show

Nell is not a good choice but Legends of the Fall (also nominated for Director) is a terrible choice.  Not to mention that Forrest Gump is a Comedy.  Cleary the Globe votes just weren’t interested enough in Shawshank which is embarrassing.  This was a thing, though during this period – Shawshank joins My Left Foot, Field of Dreams, Awakenings and The Fugitive as films nominated by the PGA and the Oscars but passed over by the Globes.

Comedy

  • The Lion King
  • The Adventures of Priscilla
  • Ed Wood
  • Four Weddings and a Funeral
  • Prêt-à-Porter

The first four were all great choices.  The list is just outside the Top 10 for this category all-time and matches 1982, 1992 and 2008 in that four of the nominees are among the Top 150 nominees of all-time (out of well more than 300) while the final nominee doesn’t make the Top 300.  The nomination of Prêt-à-Porter is all about it being directed by Altman and not about it actually being any good.  If they had gone with True Lies instead (which won Actress), it would have been 6th all-time.  The Lion King was the first film in four years and only the fourth film ever to win the Globe in this category and fail to earn an Oscar nomination while one of the films it beat did earn one (in this case, Four Weddings) while in the following 13 years it would happen four more times.

Independent Spirits

  • Pulp Fiction
  • Bullets over Broadway
  • Eat Drink Man Woman
  • Mrs. Parker & the Vicious Circle
  • Wes Craven’s New Nightmare

New Nightmare is really an odd choice especially since Death and the Maiden was eligible.  I’m also confused by their rules since Eat Drink is clearly eligible (but might not have been for International Film) yet Red doesn’t appear to have been eligible outside of the International Film category.  Pulp Fiction was the first film since 1986 to win the Indie and go on to earn an Oscar nomination.

Nighthawks

  1. Ed Wood
  2. Pulp Fiction
  3. The Shawshank Redemption
  4. Four Weddings and a Funeral
  5. Red

It’s actually really tough to pick the #5 film between Red, Heavenly Creatures and Quiz Show.  It’s the best Top 5 since 1989.

Drama

  1. Pulp Fiction
  2. The Shawshank Redemption
  3. Red
  4. Quiz Show
  5. Heavenly Creatures

A strong year, the third best since 1980 although just a tiny bit weaker than the year before.

Comedy

  1. Ed Wood
  2. Four Weddings and a Funeral
  3. Bullets over Broadway
  4. Clerks
  5. The Adventures of Priscilla

Though not quite as strong as Drama, the best Top 5 in Comedy since 1964, the third best to-date and the fifth best all-time.  Bullets, the #3 film, would be a winner in over 20 years and Priscilla would be a #3 film in all but 20 years.

Best Director

Consensus

  1. Quentin Tarantino  (Pulp Fiction)  –  747 pts
  2. Robert Zemeckis  (Forrest Gump)  –  330 pts
  3. Krzyzstof Kieslowski  (Red)  –  264 pts
  4. Robert Redford  (Quiz Show)  –  180 pts
  5. Mike Newell  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)  –  162 pts

Tarantino’s point total is the second highest to this date (behind Scorsese for GoodFellas) and 11th all-time and his percentage of the points is the second highest since 1974.  Because it is part of my calculation of the Top 100 Directors, this is the one Consensus list that includes, not only awards I don’t normally consider (Indie Spirits, festival winners, critics runner-up) but also the Nighthawk Awards.

DGA

  • Robert Zemeckis  (Forrest Gump)
  • Frank Darabont  (The Shawshank Redemption)
  • Mike Newell  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)
  • Robert Redford  (Quiz Show)
  • Quentin Tarantino  (Pulp Fiction)

This is the sixth time in history and the first time in a decade that the five DGA nominees match the five Best Picture nominees at the Oscar.  Like three of the previous times (1975, 1978, 1984), it doesn’t actually match the Director nominees at the Oscars 5/5.  It is the only time in history that the Picture match-up is 5/5 and the Director match-up is 3/5.  As of late 2019, Tarantino, by a good mile the best director on this list, still doesn’t have a DGA win and only has one other nomination.

Academy Awards

  • Robert Zemeckis  (Forrest Gump)
  • Woody Allen  (Bullets over Broadway)
  • Krzyzstof Kieslowski  (Red)
  • Robert Redford  (Quiz Show)
  • Quentin Tarantino  (Pulp Fiction)

This was Allen’s sixth nomination, moving him up to 315 points and a tie for 7th place all-time.  The Oscar Score is a solid 80.0, the highest between 1991 and 2002.  It’s worth noting that we have not yet reached the point where Miramax was promoting the hell out of their films for the Oscars but, even with only one Best Picture nomination, it has three of the five Best Director nominees.

Critics

  • NYFC:  Quentin Tarantino  (Pulp Fiction)
    • Krzyzstof Kieslowski  (Red)
  • LAFC:  Quentin Tarantino  (Pulp Fiction)
  • NSFC:  Quentin Tarantino  (Pulp Fiction)
    • Krzyzstof Kieslowski  (Red)
    • Louis Malle  (Vanya on 42nd Street)
  • BSFC:  Quentin Tarantino  (Pulp Fiction)
    • Louis Malle  (Vanya on 42nd Street)
    • Robert Redford  (Quiz Show)
  • CFC:  Quentin Tarantino  (Pulp Fiction)
    • Tim Burton  (Ed Wood)
    • Kevin James  (Hoop Dreams)
    • Krzyzstof Kieslowski  (Red)
    • Robert Zemeckis  (Forrest Gump)
  • NBR:  Quentin Tarantino  (Pulp Fiction)

Tarantino becomes the first director to win all six critics awards for the same film (Curtis Hanson would do it three years later for L.A. Confidential).  The CFC has generally been more like the Oscars in terms of singling out performances but it’s surprising that the NYFC and NSFC don’t mention White in their citations for Kieslowski.  Kieslowski would become the first director to earn three runner-up awards without a win (though Ang Lee would do it in 2000).

Festivals

  • Cannes:  Nanni Moretti  (Caro Diario)
  • Berlin:  Krzyzstof Kieslowski  (White)

BAFTA

  • Mike Newell  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)
  • Krysztof Kieslowski  (Red)
  • Quentin Tarantino  (Pulp Fiction)
  • Robert Zemeckis  (Forrest Gump)

Nicholas Hytner (The Madness of King George) is nominated in 1995.  This is an odd group in that includes a DGA nominee passed over at the Oscars as well as the Oscar nominee who made it instead.  Even stranger that neither Tarantino nor Zemeckis won.

Golden Globes

  • Robert Zemeckis  (Forrest Gump)
  • Robert Redford  (Quiz Show)
  • Oliver Stone  (Natural Born Killers)
  • Quentin Tarantino  (Pulp Fiction)
  • Edward Zwick  (Legends of the Fall)

It’s not so surprising that the Globes would go for Stone who had already won the Globe three times in less than a decade but to go for Zwick?  That was odd.  Natural Born Killers was just the third film since 1963 to earn a Director nomination at the Globes but no other nominations (joining Raiders of the Lost Ark and A River Runs Through It).

Independent Spirits

  • Quentin Tarantino  (Pulp Fiction)
  • John Dahl  (Red Rock West)
  • Ang Lee  (Eat Drink Man Woman)
  • Roman Polanski  (Death and the Maiden)
  • Alan Rudolph  (Mrs. Parker & the Vicious Circle)

Alan Rudolph rather than Woody Allen?  I just don’t get the Indies and never will.

Nighthawks

  1. Tim Burton  (Ed Wood)
  2. Quentin Tarantino  (Pulp Fiction)
  3. Frank Darabont  (The Shawshank Redemption)
  4. Krysztof Kieslowski  (Red)
  5. Peter Jackson  (Heavenly Creatures)

Another tough Top 5 with Robert Redford almost making it.  Darabont has never come close to making another film this good while Kieslowski would retire.  On the other hand, Tarantino would later win the Nighthawk and Jackson would win three in a row.

Drama

  1. Quentin Tarantino  (Pulp Fiction)
  2. Frank Darabont  (The Shawshank Redemption)
  3. Krysztof Kieslowski  (Red)
  4. Peter Jackson  (Heavenly Creatures)
  5. Robert Redford  (Quiz Show)

A strong Top 5 but exactly even with the previous four years.

Comedy

  1. Tim Burton  (Ed Wood)
  2. Woody Allen  (Bullets over Broadway)
  3. Mike Newell  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)
  4. Ang Lee  (Eat Drink Man Woman)
  5. Joel and Ethan Coen  (The Hudsucker Proxy)

It’s not often that the Top 5 Directors on my Comedy list are Top 100 directors let alone Top 50 directors.  As a group for their careers, much better than the Top 5 Drama directors.  The best Top 5 in six years and the second best to-date.

Best Screenplay

Critics

  • NYFC:  Pulp Fiction
    • Quiz Show
  • LAFC:  Pulp Fiction
  • NSFC:  Pulp Fiction
    • Quiz Show
    • Red
  • BSFC:  Pulp Fiction
    • Quiz Show
    • Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould
  • CFC:  Pulp Fiction
    • Forrest Gump
    • Four Weddings and a Funeral
    • Quiz Show
    • The Shawshank Redemption

The NBR wouldn’t establish a Screenplay award until 1998, thus preventing Pulp Fiction from being the first film to win six awards though it was the first to win five (Sideways would later become the first to win six).  This would be the only year during the stretch that the CFC had just one screenplay award (through 2001) that the five nominees would also be the five BP nominees at the Oscar.

Golden Globes

  • Pulp Fiction
  • Forrest Gump
  • Four Weddings and a Funeral
  • Quiz Show
  • The Shawshank Redemption

There was a 44 year stretch (1965-2008) where there were 5 Globe Screenplay nominees and 5 Oscar Picture nominees.  This is the fourth and final year, joining 1966, 1982 and 1984, in which the five films are the same in both categories.  This is the only one of those four years in which the winners are different.

Independent Spirits

  • Pulp Fiction
  • Bullets over Broadway
  • Eat Drink Man Woman
  • Mrs. Parker & the Vicious Circle
  • Red Rock West

This is the first of three times in which the winners of the single Screenplay category at the Globes and the Indies are the same (the other two would be Lost in Translation and Sideways).  I don’t know if Clerks was eligible and if it was, it’s ridiculous that it wasn’t nominated.

Adapted

Consensus

  1. Forrest Gump  –  232 pts
  2. Quiz Show  –  192 pts
  3. The Madness of King George  –  120 pts
  4. The Shawshank Redemption  –  112 pts
  5. Ed Wood  /  Little Women  /  Nobody’s Fool  /  The Browning Version  –  40 pts

Forrest Gump has anything but a mandate.  With just 4 noms, 2 wins and 232 weighted points, it has the lowest total for a winner and lowest margin for a winner in five years and is the first film in seven years to win the Consensus with only two wins.  Though, because of the lack of critics awards, it has only the lowest Consensus percentage in four years.  Ed Wood, as will be seen below, doesn’t really belong here because its only nomination was as an original, but since the Academy (and my own list) consider it adapted it’s part of the four-way fifth place tie.

WGA

  • Forrest Gump
  • Little Women
  • The Madness of King George
  • Quiz Show
  • The Shawshank Redemption

A solid group though I was a little surprised that Madness was eligible.  Since Ed Wood was definitely not eligible here, it’s pretty damn solid.

Academy Awards

  • Forrest Gump
  • The Madness of King George
  • Nobody’s Fool
  • Quiz Show
  • The Shawshank Redemption

The Oscar Score is 77.1 which would normally be solid but given the 100 of the year before is a little disappointing.  That’s based on the presumption that Ed Wood would have been considered adapted (which is likely but not 100%); if not, the Oscar Score would be a very good 87.5.

BAFTA

  • Quiz Show
  • The Browning Version
  • Forrest Gump
  • The Joy Luck Club
  • Red

The Madness of King George is nominated in 1995.  Yes, the BAFTAs decided Red was adapted (and there’s a case to be made for that).  Quiz Show is rather a surprising winner here.  A considerably weaker group than the Oscars or WGA.

Nighthawks

  1. Ed Wood
  2. The Shawshank Redemption
  3. Quiz Show
  4. Nobody’s Fool
  5. Grave of the Fireflies

A solid group but not nearly as strong as the original scripts.

Drama

  1. The Shawshank Redemption
  2. Quiz Show
  3. Grave of the Fireflies
  4. The Madness of King George
  5. Little Women

A weak spot in the year as the originals are so much stronger, especially when you get down to the genre split.

Comedy

  1. Ed Wood
  2. Nobody’s Fool
  3. Forrest Gump

Yes, three is the full list and it’s lucky that I changed Nobody’s Fool to a Comedy.  This category is often weak (because more Comedies are original) and these three would still be the second best Top 5 in the 1980’s.

Original

Consensus

  1. Pulp Fiction  –  592 pts
  2. Four Weddings and a Funeral  –  192 pts
  3. Bullets over Broadway  –  120 pts
  4. The Adventures of Priscilla  –  80 pts
  5. Heavenly Creatures  /  Red  –  80 pts

Pulp Fiction has historical domination here.  Its points total (592) crushes the old record (504 set by Annie Hall) and won’t be broken until 2015 and that’s only because of the BFCA being created.  The only two films that have beaten Pulp Fiction in points and the only four films that have beaten it in nominations (no film has beaten its 8 wins though two films – Spotlight and Manchester by the Sea – have tied it) benefit from the BFCA and being WGA eligible.  Pulp Fiction is still, through 2019, the only film to have over 50% of the Consensus points in this category.  The bottom three films on this list were all left off by one group each.  Still, it shows a clear consensus, not only for the winner but also for the nominees as this is the only year between 1986 and 2012 where every film has at least two nominations.

WGA

  • Four Weddings and a Funeral
  • The Adventures of Priscilla
  • Bullets over Broadway
  • Ed Wood
  • Heavenly Creatures

Pulp Fiction is ineligible as Quentin is not a member of the WGA.  It’s the first time in four years the WGA and Oscar disagree in this category and the first time since 1982 that the Oscar winner doesn’t earn a WGA nom (for Gandhi, which also wasn’t eligible).  Given that Red and White were almost certainly ineligible as well this list is just about as good as it could possibly be (I would substitute Clerks for Priscilla).

Academy Awards

  • Pulp Fiction
  • Bullets over Broadway
  • Four Weddings and a Funeral
  • Heavenly Creatures
  • Red

An Oscar Score of 97.5, the best in the category since 1959.

BAFTA

  • Pulp Fiction
  • The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert
  • Four Weddings and a Funeral
  • Philadelphia

Bullets over Broadway is nominated in 1995.  Another strong group.

Nighthawks

  1. Pulp Fiction
  2. Four Weddings and a Funeral
  3. Clerks
  4. Red
  5. Bullets over Broadway

A fantastic group of originals.  Tied with 1974 for the best to-date and only 1999 and 2001 since are better.  Plus, it’s tough to even choose the Top 5 with Heavenly Creatures, White and Adventures of Priscilla all landing outside.

Drama

  1. Pulp Fiction
  2. Red
  3. Heavenly Creatures
  4. White
  5. The Scent of Green Papaya

A solid group, the best in three years but if Scent had been a little better this would have been the best since 1974 and the second best to-date.  A really, really strong Top 4.

Comedy

  1. Four Weddings and a Funeral
  2. Clerks
  3. Bullets over Broadway
  4. The Adventures of Priscilla
  5. Eat Drink Man Woman

The best Top 5 to-date and though it will be equalled in 1996 and 2007 it won’t be surpassed until 2013.

Best Actor

Consensus

  1. Tom Hanks  (Forrest Gump)  –  336 points
  2. Paul Newman  (Nobody’s Fool)  –  228 points
  3. John Travolta  (Pulp Fiction)  –  200 points
  4. Hugh Grant  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)  –  119 points
  5. Nigel Hawthorne  (The Madness of King George)  –  105 points

Hanks wins by a decent margin and has more points than either of the previous two winners though that’s helped by the creation of the SAG Awards.  Of the 11 actors to win the BAFTA and the Globe – Comedy, Grant is the only one to fail to earn an Oscar nomination.  Morgan Freeman actually has three nominations to the two each for Grant and Hawthorne but Hawthorne winning the BAFTA gives him a higher weighted total.

Academy Awards

  • Tom Hanks  (Forrest Gump)
  • Morgan Freeman  (The Shawshank Redemption)
  • Nigel Hawthorne  (The Madness of King George)
  • Paul Newman  (Nobody’s Fool)
  • John Travolta  (Pulp Fiction)

By passing over Fiennes and Robbins, the Oscar Score is 76.3 which is the lowest in the category since 1985 but a start of a less than great run (three of the next seven years will have lower scores).  They also passed over Hugh Grant who did a funny bit about it at the Oscars that year.

Critics

  • NYFC:  Paul Newman  (Nobody’s Fool)
    • Samuel L. Jackson  (Pulp Fiction)
  • LAFC:  John Travolta  (Pulp Fiction)
  • NSFC:  Paul Newman  (Nobody’s Fool)
    • Samuel L. Jackson  (Pulp Fiction)
    • John Travolta  (Pulp Fiction)
  • BSFC:  Albert Finney  (The Browning Version)
    • Henry Czerny  (The Boys of St. Vincent’s)
    • Wallace Shawn  (Vanya on 42nd Street)
  • CFC:  Tom Hanks  (Forrest Gump)
    • Johnny Depp  (Ed Wood)
    • Samuel L. Jackson  (Pulp Fiction)
    • Tommy Lee Jones  (Cobb)
    • John Travolta  (Pulp Fiction)
  • NBR:  Tom Hanks  (Forrest Gump)

This can be kind of be blamed on what I was talking about in my Crimes and Misdemeanors review (towards the bottom here).  Because of the ensemble aspect of Pulp Fiction, critics clearly weren’t certain whether Jackson and Travolta were both leads.  For my own part, I considered Travolta the single lead from the start because he is a primary focus of two storylines, the only major character to do that.

Festivals

  • Cannes:  Ge You  (To Live)
  • Berlin:  Paul Newman  (Nobody’s Fool)

The Berlin award is actually the 1995 award.  The 1994 award went to Tom Hanks but for Philadelphia.

SAG

  • Tom Hanks  (Forrest Gump)
  • Morgan Freeman  (The Shawshank Redemption)
  • Paul Newman  (Nobody’s Fool)
  • Tim Robbins  (The Shawshank Redemption)
  • John Travolta  (Pulp Fiction)

The first year of the SAG Awards and they agree with the Oscars 4/5 going with an American actor instead of the British one.  And, as good as Hawthorne is, they made the right choice going with Robbins instead.  I can’t understand how he wasn’t Oscar nominated.

BAFTA

  • Hugh Grant  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)
  • Tom Hanks  (Forrest Gump)
  • Terence Stamp  (The Adventures of Priscilla)
  • John Travolta  (Pulp Fiction)

Nigel Hawthorne would win the BAFTA the following year for Madness of King George.  Grant is the first BAFTA winner in four years to fail to earn an Oscar nom but that’s not out of place.  Of the six actors to win the BAFTA and fail to earn an Oscar nom since 1973, all but one were British (and the other one was French).

Golden Globes

Drama

  • Tom Hanks  (Forrest Gump)
  • Morgan Freeman  (The Shawshank Redemption)
  • Paul Newman  (Nobody’s Fool)
  • Brad Pitt  (Legends of the Fall)
  • John Travolta  (Pulp Fiction)

Not an impressive group as far as I am concerned.  First, I consider Gump a Comedy and I have now moved Nobody’s Fool to Comedy as well.  Second, Pitt is just terrible.  As can be seen below, there is only one overlapping actor with my list.

Comedy

  • Hugh Grant  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)
  • Jim Carrey  (The Mask)
  • Johnny Depp  (Ed Wood)
  • Arnold Schwarzenegger  (Junior)
  • Terence Stamp  (The Adventures of Priscilla)

Three really good choices and two terrible choices.  Even excluding my own two nominees that the Globes considered Drama there was Kevin Spacey (The Ref), John Cusack (Bullets over Broadway), Ian Heart (Backbeat) or even Michael Keaton (Speechless) and Nicolas Cage (Guarding Tess) who were better than Carrey or Arnie and were in films that earned Actress noms.

Independent Spirits

  • Samuel L. Jackson  (Pulp Fiction)
  • Sihung Lung  (Eat Drink Man Woman)
  • William H. Macy  (Oleanna)
  • Campbell Scott  (Mrs. Parker & the Vicious Circle)
  • Jon Seda  (I Like it Like That)

Interesting that they didn’t go with Travolta.  They also could have gone with Ben Kingsley in Death and the Maiden.

Nighthawks

  1. Johnny Depp  (Ed Wood)
  2. Ralph Fiennes  (Quiz Show)
  3. Tim Robbins  (The Shawshank Redemption)
  4. Paul Newman  (Nobody’s Fool)
  5. Terrence Stamp  (The Adventures of Priscilla)

A more than solid Top 5 although considerably weaker than the year before.  The top four were easy but choosing the fifth between Stamp, Hawthorne, Grant and Freeman was much more difficult.

Drama

  1. Ralph Fiennes  (Quiz Show)
  2. Tim Robbins  (The Shawshank Redemption)
  3. Nigel Hawthorne  (The Madness of King George)
  4. Morgan Freeman  (The Shawshank Redemption)
  5. Ben Kingsley  (Death and the Maiden)

Even more of a drop from the year before and the weakest Top 5 since 1987.

Comedy

  1. Johnny Depp  (Ed Wood)
  2. Paul Newman  (Nobody’s Fool)
  3. Terrence Stamp  (The Adventures of Priscilla)
  4. Hugh Grant  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)
  5. Tom Hanks  (Forrest Gump)

This Top 5, however, especially with Newman here is tied with 1964 and 1988 as the best to-date.  A really strong group.

Best Actress

Consensus

  1. Jessica Lange  (Blue Sky)  –  224 points
  2. Miranda Richardson  (Tom & Viv)  –  151 points
  3. Jennifer Jason Leigh  (Mrs. Parker & the Vicious Circle)  –  144 points
  4. Susan Sarandon  (The Client)  –  140 points
  5. Jodie Foster  (Nell)  –  130 points

The top three actresses combined have fewer points than Emma Thompson and Holly Hunter in each of the previous two years.  Lange has the lowest points for a winner since 1988 and the lowest percentage since 1985.  The problems seemed to be that Lange and Foster had Oscars, Richardson was in a bad film and Leigh was in a film that nobody saw.  Leigh becomes the first actress since 1986 to earn two critics wins without an Oscar nomination and just the second American actress to do so.

Academy Awards

  • Jessica Lange  (Blue Sky)
  • Jodie Foster  (Nell)
  • Miranda Richardson  (Tom & Viv)
  • Winona Ryder  (Little Women)
  • Susan Sarandon  (The Client)

The weakest Top 5 at the Oscars since 1985 and the lowest Oscar Score (which compares the Top 5 to the best Top 5) since 1973.  They haven’t botched this category even close to this badly since.

Critics

  • NYFC:  Linda Fiorentino  (The Last Seduction)
    • Jennifer Jason Leigh  (Mrs. Parker & the Vicious Circle)
    • Crissy Rock  (Ladybird Ladybird)
  • LAFC:  Jessica Lange  (Blue Sky)
  • NSFC:  Jennifer Jason Leigh  (Mrs. Parker & the Vicious Circle)
    • Linda Fiorentino  (The Last Seduction)
    • Jessica Lange  (Blue Sky)
  • BSFC:  Julianne Moore  (Vanya on 42nd Street)
    • Linda Fiorentino  (The Last Seduction)
    • Wallace Shawn  (Vanya on 42nd Street)
  • CFC:  Jennifer Jason Leigh  (Mrs. Parker & the Vicious Circle)
    • Linda Fiorentino  (The Last Seduction)
    • Jodie Foster  (Nell)
    • Jessica Lange  (Blue Sky)
    • Winona Ryder  (Little Women)
  • NBR:  Miranda Richardson  (Tom & Viv)

Given how critics groups often throw in other performances even if they aren’t worthy (like Kevin Spacey getting a mention for Outbreak for one of his awards the next year), I’m surprised that none of the groups cited Leigh for her work in Hudsucker Proxy, one of the best comedic performances of the year.

Festivals

  • Cannes:  Virna Lisi  (Queen Margot)
  • Berlin:  Crissy Rock  (Ladybird Ladybird)

Cannes doesn’t do supporting awards which is why you get something like this, a clear supporting role winning the Actress award.

SAG

  • Jodie Foster  (Nell)
  • Jessica Lange  (Blue Sky)
  • Meg Ryan  (When a Man Loves a Woman)
  • Susan Sarandon  (The Client)
  • Meryl Streep  (The River Wild)

Not surprising that SAG in their first year would pass over a British actress for Meryl.  Meg Ryan, on the other hand, probably thought this would lead to her first Oscar nomination.  I actually think this Top 5 is worse than the Oscars.

BAFTA

  • Susan Sarandon  (The Client)
  • Linda Fiorentino  (The Last Seduction)
  • Irene Jacob  (Red)
  • Uma Thurman  (Pulp Fiction)

That’s two really good nominees, a very weak winner and someone who should be in supporting.

Golden Globes

Drama

  • Jessica Lange  (Blue Sky)
  • Jennifer Jason Leigh  (Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle)
  • Jodie Foster  (Nell)
  • Miranda Richardson  (Tom & Viv)
  • Meryl Streep  (The River Wild)

At least they nominated Leigh.

Comedy

  • Jamie Lee Curtis  (True Lies)
  • Geena Davis  (Speechless)
  • Andie MacDowell  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)
  • Shirley MacLaine  (Guarding Tess)
  • Emma Thompson  (Junior)

To be fair to this terrible group of nominees (although no group that nominates MacDowell’s terrible performance deserves fairness) this was a weak year for Comedy.  And clearly the Globes weren’t going for Hudsucker like they should have.

Independent Spirits

  • Linda Fiorentino  (The Last Seduction)
  • Jennifer Jason Leigh  (Mrs. Parker & the Vicious Circle)
  • Karen Sillas  (What Happened Was…)
  • Lauren Velez  (I Like It Like That)
  • Chien-lien Wu  (Eat Drink Man Woman)

Not even the Indies nominated Sigourney Weaver?  What the hell!

Nighthawks

  1. Sigourney Weaver  (Death and the Maiden)
  2. Isabelle Adjani  (Queen Margot)
  3. Jennifer Jason Leigh  (Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle)
  4. Winona Ryder  (Little Women)
  5. Natalie Portman  (Leon)

Several points weaker than 1993 but actually tied with 1991 as the second best Top 5 since 1983 so overall not bad.  It’s just that other groups didn’t notice the best performances of the year.

Drama

  1. Sigourney Weaver  (Death and the Maiden)
  2. Isabelle Adjani  (Queen Margot)
  3. Jennifer Jason Leigh  (Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle)
  4. Winona Ryder  (Little Women)
  5. Natalie Portman  (Leon)

Because only one performance in my Top 17 is Comedy it means some of the performances not mentioned here are Fiorentino, Irene Jacob and Julianne Moore (Vanya).  The second best Top 5 since 1983 and third best since 1974.

Comedy

  1. Jennifer Jason Leigh  (The Hudsucker Proxy)
  2. Judy Davis  (The Ref)
  3. Tara Fitzgerald  (Sirens)
  4. Shirley MacLaine  (Guarding Tess)
  5. Jamie Lee Curtis  (True Lies)

A really weak group, the worst Top 5 since 1984 and there won’t be one even close to this bad again until 2008.

Best Supporting Actor

Consensus

  1. Martin Landau  (Ed Wood)  –  474 points
  2. Samuel L. Jackson  (Pulp Fiction)  –  144 points
  3. Gary Sinise  (Forrest Gump)  –  132 points
  4. Paul Scofield  (Quiz Show)  –  60 points
  5. Chazz Palmentiri  (Bullets over Broadway)  –  60 points

Landau will fail to win the BAFTA but with 8 wins (thanks to SAG starting up) he sets records for wins, noms and points though his percentage is far below Gene Hackman in 1992.  All of Landau’s records will be broken in 2009.  This is the third year in a row that all the Oscar nominees are also Consensus nominees but it won’t happen again until 2000.  Scofield makes the Consensus because his two noms are stronger than Turturro’s but it’s interesting that all four of the award groups nominate one or the other but not both.

Academy Awards

  • Martin Landau  (Ed Wood)
  • Samuel L. Jackson  (Pulp Fiction)
  • Chazz Palmentiri  (Bullets over Broadway)
  • Paul Scofield  (Quiz Show)
  • Gary Sinise  (Forrest Gump)

At a 94.7 one of the best years to-date, although, ironically, below 1993 and even with 1992.  Still, there won’t be a better year again until 2005.

Critics

  • NYFC:  Martin Landau  (Ed Wood)
    • Paul Scofield  (Quiz Show)
  • LAFC:  Martin Landau  (Ed Wood)
  • NSFC:  Martin Landau  (Ed Wood)
    • Samuel L. Jackson  (Pulp Fiction)
    • Paul Scofield  (Quiz Show)
  • BSFC:  Martin Landau  (Ed Wood)
  • CFC:  Martin Landau  (Ed Wood)
    • Morgan Freeman  (The Shawshank Redemption)
    • Anthony Hopkins  (The Road to Wellville)
    • Chazz Palmentiri  (Bullets Over Broadway)
    • John Turturro  (Quiz Show)
    • Gary Sinise  (Forrest Gump)
  • NBR:  Gary Sinise  (Forrest Gump)

Landau joins Jack Nicholson as just the second person to win five critics awards in this category.  Like later 5 critics winner Christoph Waltz and J.K. Simmons, Landau fails to win the NBR.  I can’t fathom with the CFC voters were thinking putting one of Hopkins’ worst performances on their list.

SAG

  • Martin Landau  (Ed Wood)
  • Samuel L. Jackson  (Pulp Fiction)
  • Chazz Palmentiri  (Bullets over Broadway)
  • Gary Sinise  (Forrest Gump)
  • John Turturro  (Quiz Show)

Turturro earning a SAG but a different actor earning an Oscar nom is something that will continue to happen now and then across the four acting categories.

BAFTA

  • Samuel L. Jackson  (Pulp Fiction)
  • Simon Callow  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)
  • John Hannah  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)
  • Paul Scofield  (Quiz Show)

Martin Landau (Ed Wood) is nominated in 1995.  The nominations for the Four Weddings actors isn’t much of a surprise nor that the Brits would go for their own in Quiz Show.

Golden Globes

  • Martin Landau  (Ed Wood)
  • Kevin Bacon  (The River Wild)
  • Samuel L. Jackson  (Pulp Fiction)
  • Gary Sinise  (Forrest Gump)
  • John Turturro  (Quiz Show)

Actually a little surprised the more populist Globes didn’t go for Sinise.  Bacon is not bad (#11 on my list) but really doesn’t belong.

Independent Spirits

  • Chazz Palmentiri  (Bullets over Broadway)
  • Giancarlo Esposito  (Fresh)
  • Larry Pine  (Vanya on 42nd Street)
  • Eric Stoltz  (Pulp Fiction)
  • Nicholas Turturro  (Federal Hill)

If you’re going to go for someone in a small role in Pulp Fiction, Ving Rhames or Harvey Keitel would have better choices.

Nighthawks

  1. Martin Landau  (Ed Wood)
  2. Samuel L. Jackson  (Pulp Fiction)
  3. John Turturro  (Quiz Show)
  4. Chazz Palmentiri  (Bullets over Broadway)
  5. Paul Scofield  (Quiz Show)

A very good strong Top 5 though there have been a lot of those in this era and this year ties 1992.

Drama

  1. Samuel L. Jackson  (Pulp Fiction)
  2. John Turturro  (Quiz Show)
  3. Paul Scofield  (Quiz Show)
  4. Ian Holm  (The Madness of King George)
  5. Jean-Louis Trintignant  (Red)

There’s a considerable drop-off to the #4 and 5 spots so this is actually the weakest Top 5 since 1988.

Comedy

  1. Martin Landau  (Ed Wood)
  2. Chazz Palmentiri  (Bullets over Broadway)
  3. Gary Sinise  (Forrest Gump)
  4. Paul Newman  (The Hudsucker Proxy)
  5. Simon Callow  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)

For the first time since 1978 the Comedy Top 5 is actually superior to the Drama Top 5.  The second best Top 5 to-date behind only 1988.

Best Supporting Actress

Consensus

  1. Dianne Wiest  (Bullets over Broadway)  –  384 points
  2. Uma Thurman  (Pulp Fiction)  –  116 points
  3. Rosemary Harris  (Tom & Viv)  –  78 points
  4. Kirsten Dunst  (Interview with the Vampire)  –  75 points
  5. Helen Mirren  (The Madness of King George)  –  65 points

Wiest has the most points since 1985 and the most wins since 1984 and won’t be passed in either category again until 2008.  But, aside from Wiest and Thurman there just wasn’t much consensus.

Academy Awards

  • Dianne Wiest  (Bullets over Broadway)
  • Rosemary Harris  (Tom & Viv)
  • Helen Mirren  (The Madness of King George)
  • Uma Thurman  (Pulp Fiction)
  • Jennifer Tilly  (Bullets over Broadway)

She is good, I’ll admit but the actual nomination for Tilly left me (and a lot of other people) flabber-gasted.  It was a real shocker.  A strong Oscar Score of 93.3, the best in the category in six years and it won’t be better again for another four years.  But that’s because of the lack of competition – the raw score for the Top 5 is considerably lower than the 1993 nominees who had a slightly lower Oscar score.

Critics

  • NYFC:  Dianne Wiest  (Bullets over Broadway)
    • Uma Thurman  (Pulp Fiction)
    • Alfre Woodard  (Crooklyn)
  • LAFC:  Dianne Wiest  (Bullets over Broadway)
  • NSFC:  Dianne Wiest  (Bullets over Broadway)
    • Brooke Smith  (Vanya on 42nd Street)
    • Uma Thurman  (Pulp Fiction)
  • BSFC:  Kirsten Dunst  (Interview with the Vampire, Little Women)
    • Dianne Wiest  (Bullets over Broadway)
    • Tracey Ullman  (Bullets over Broadway, I’ll Do Anything, Pret-a-Porter)
  • CFC:  Dianne Wiest  (Bullets over Broadway)
    • Claire Danes  (Little Women)
    • Kirsten Dunst  (Interview with the Vampire)
    • Lena Olin  (Romeo is Bleeding)
    • Uma Thurman  (Pulp Fiction)
  • NBR:  Rosemary Harris  (Tom & Viv)

Until Wiest started winning the critics awards she was my easy #1 for Actress but placing her here botched my Actress category for a long time.

SAG

  • Dianne Wiest  (Bullets over Broadway)
  • Jamie Lee Curtis  (True Lies)
  • Sally Field  (Forrest Gump)
  • Robin Wright Penn  (Forrest Gump)
  • Uma Thurman  (Pulp Fiction)

Just not a strong group, even accounting for Curtis belonging in the lead category.  The first year of SAG and only 2/5 matching with the Oscars.

BAFTA

  • Kristin Scott Thomas  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)
  • Charlotte Coleman  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)
  • Sally Field  (Forrest Gump)
  • Anjelica Huston  (Manhattan Murder Mystery)

A nice winner but the nominees are a really weak bunch.  Mirren was nominated in 1995 but as a lead.

Golden Globes

  • Dianne Wiest  (Bullets over Broadway)
  • Kirsten Dunst  (Interview with the Vampire)
  • Sophia Loren  (Pret-a-Porter)
  • Robin Wright Penn  (Forrest Gump)
  • Uma Thurman  (Pulp Fiction)

Kudos to the Globes for nominating Dunst but heckles for their star-fucker pose in nominating Loren.

Independent Spirits

  • Dianne Wiest  (Bullets over Broadway)
  • V.S. Brodie  (Go Fish)
  • Carl Gallo  (Spanking the Monkey)
  • Kelly Lynch  (The Beans of Egypt, Maine)
  • Brooke Smith  (Vanya on 42nd Street)

The first time and until 2008 the only time the Indies would agree with the Oscars in this category.

Nighthawks

  1. Dianne Wiest  (Bullets over Broadway)
  2. Uma Thurman  (Pulp Fiction)
  3. Helen Mirren  (The Madness of King George)
  4. Kirsten Dunst  (Interview with the Vampire)
  5. Kristin Scott Thomas  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)

Wiest wins this with ease and Thurman is the only other really strong contender.  The weakest Top 5 since 1987.

Drama

  1. Uma Thurman  (Pulp Fiction)
  2. Helen Mirren  (The Madness of King George)
  3. Kirsten Dunst  (Interview with the Vampire)
  4. Susan Sarandon  (Little Women)
  5. Greta Scachi  (The Browning Version)

The weakest Top 5 in three years.

Comedy

  1. Dianne Wiest  (Bullets over Broadway)
  2. Kristin Scott Thomas  (Four Weddings and a Funeral)
  3. Jennifer Tilly  (Bullets over Broadway)
  4. Joan Plowright  (Widows’ Peak)
  5. Jessica Tandy  (Nobody’s Fool)

A weak Top 5 but 1993 had been historically weak so it’s better than that year at least.  But there won’t be a Top 5 this weak again until 2005.

Best Editing

Academy Awards

  • Forrest Gump
  • Hoop Dreams
  • Pulp Fiction
  • The Shawshank Redemption
  • Speed

Oscar Score of 74.4 which is the same as 1992 but better than most years in the 90’s.  I give Gump more credit on the Visual Effects for creating the film than the Editing and I don’t actually think that highly of Speed‘s Editing.

ACE

  • Forrest Gump
  • Pulp Fiction
  • The Shawshank Redemption
  • Speed
  • True Lies

A little surprised that ACE went for the bombast of True Lies.

BAFTA

  • Speed
  • Forrest Gump
  • Four Weddings and a Funeral
  • Pulp Fiction

The Madness of King George is nominated in 1995

Nighthawks

  1. Pulp Fiction
  2. Ed Wood
  3. Heavenly Creatures
  4. The Shawshank Redemption
  5. Four Weddings and a Funeral

A solid Top 5 but it’s in an era of solid Top 5’s.

Best Cinematography

Consensus

  1. Ed Wood  –  190 points
  2. The Shawshank Redemption  –  80 points
  3. Legends of the Fall  –  78 points
  4. Forrest Gump  –  78 points
  5. Wyatt Earp  –  53 points

Ed Wood wins easily.  It is, however, the only film in history to win four critics awards in this category and fail to earn an Oscar, ASC or BAFTA nomination (all other four-time critics winners earn at least two of the three) though Wings of Desire and Barton Fink had won three each without those noms.  It is the last Consensus winner (through 2018) to fail to earn at least an Oscar and ASC nomination.  Legends of the Fall, on the other hand, is the fourth Oscar winner in six years to rank 3rd in the Consensus, though, it won’t happen again until 2009.

Academy Awards

  • Legends of the Fall
  • Forrest Gump
  • Red
  • The Shawshank Redemption
  • Wyatt Earp

An Oscar Score of 78.9 which is the best since 1987 although it’s only slightly higher than the average for the decade.  It’s ridiculous that they didn’t nominate Ed Wood.

Critics

  • NYFC:  Ed Wood
  • LAFC:  Ed Wood
  • NSFC:  Ed Wood
    • Interview with the Vampire
    • Red
  • BSFC:  Ed Wood

ASC

  • The Shawshank Redemption
  • Forrest Gump
  • Legends of the Fall
  • Love Affair
  • Wyatt Earp

For the third time in four years, the Oscar, ASC and BAFTA don’t agree on the winner at all.  It won’t happen again until 2003 and 2009 is the only other year since to have it happen.

BAFTA

  • Interview with the Vampire
  • The Adventures of Priscilla
  • Forrest Gump
  • Pulp Fiction

The Madness of King George is nominated in 1995.  Interview with the Vampire is the last BAFTA winner through 2018 to fail to earn a Consensus nomination as well as the last to-date to not earn either an Oscar or ASC nom.

Independent Spirits

  • Barcelona
  • The Beans of Egypt, Maine
  • Eat Drink Man Woman
  • I Like It Like That
  • Suture

Here’s a good example of why I pay no mind to the Indies.  Eat Drink Man Woman is the only nominee to make my list and it was down at #20.  Films that were eligible (earning Indie noms in other categories) on my list include Pulp Fiction (3), Death and the Maiden (14), Bullets over Broadway (17), The Last Seduction (23) and Red Rock West (24).  Or that it would seem that films nominated for Best International Film are ineligible for other awards (otherwise Red, my #2 would be listed as well) but Eat Drink Man Woman which wasn’t nominated in that category was eligible in everything.  I’m glad they reward films that get overlooked but I think their rules are bizarre, arbitrary and stupid and so their awards have no relevance for my consensus awards.

Nighthawks

  1. Ed Wood
  2. Red
  3. Pulp Fiction
  4. The Shawshank Redemption
  5. Wyatt Earp

I don’t nominate the Oscar winner but they didn’t nominate my winner either.

Best Original Score

Academy Awards

  • Hans Zimmer  (The Lion King)
  • Elliot Goldenthal  (Interview with the Vampire)
  • Thomas Newman  (Little Women)
  • Thomas Newman  (The Shawshank Redemption)
  • Alan Silvestri  (Forrest Gump)

An Oscar Score of 80.6, the best in five years.  This is the last year before the Academy went to a two category system (Score, Comedy Score) because of Disney’s four wins in six years.  While I love all four of those Disney scores, this is the only one I thought should have won because the other three all had really magnificent scores up against them with 1989 in particular the greatest year for the category.

Critics

  • LAFC:  Danny Elfman  (Ed Wood)
  • CFC:  Hans Zimmer  (The Lion King)

BAFTA

  • Backbeat
  • The Adventures of Priscilla
  • Four Weddings and a Funeral
  • The Lion King

The Madness of King George is nominated in 1995.  It helps to remember that this is the “Anthony Asquith Award for Film Music” which explains why three films with so little use of a score are nominated including the winner.  That’s also why I didn’t bother to list the composer; in this year in particular it’s practically irrelevant.

Golden Globes

  • Hans Zimmer  (The Lion King)
  • Alan Silvestri  (Forrest Gump)
  • Elliot Goldenthal  (Interview with the Vampire)
  • James Horner  (Legends of the Fall)
  • Mark Isham  (Nell)

This marks the first time since 1977 that the Oscar, Globe and Nighthawk all go to the same Score.  It also makes it the first Score since 1987 to win the Oscar, Globe and a critic’s award.

Nighthawks

  1. Hans Zimmer  (The Lion King)
  2. Danny Elfman  (Ed Wood)
  3. Zbigniew Preisner  (Red)
  4. Alan Silvestri  (Forrest Gump)
  5. Thomas Newman  (The Shawshank Redemption)

The weakest Top 5 in six years although the next two years will be considerably weaker.  The Lion King is the last great Disney score for a considerable time.

Best Sound

Academy Awards

  • Speed
  • Clear and Present Danger
  • Forrest Gump
  • Legends of the Fall
  • The Shawshank Redemption

The Oscar Score is 59.3 which is low for this era (lowest since 1987 though 1995 will be lower) but still better than the overall score in this category because this category was so badly done at the Oscars for a long time.

CAS

  • Forrest Gump
  • Clear and Present Danger
  • The Lion King
  • Speed
  • True Lies

Speed is the last Oscar winner to fail to win the CAS until 2001.

BAFTA

  • Speed
  • Backbeat
  • The Lion King
  • Pulp Fiction

The Madness of King George is nominated in 1995 which I find kind of perplexing.

Nighthawks

  1. The Crow
  2. Leon
  3. The Shawshank Redemption
  4. Wyatt Earp
  5. Quiz Show

Though Speed is the clear Consensus winner, I think it’s the Sound Editing in the film that is much more impressive.  It’s way down on my list.  This is actually a really weak year in this category, the weakest Top 5 since 1978 and no year since has even come close to being this low.

Best Art Direction

Academy Awards

  • The Madness of King George
  • Bullets over Broadway
  • Forrest Gump
  • Interview with the Vampire
  • Legends of the Fall

An Oscar Score of 69.2.  That’s the lowest score in this category since 1978 and it’s because Gump is low down on my list and Legends of the Fall isn’t on it at all.  Not bad choices overall (it’s as high or better than multiple years since 1978) but there were really good choices to be made.

LAFC

  • The Hudsucker Proxy

BAFTA

  • Interview with the Vampire
  • The Adventures of Priscilla
  • Frankenstein
  • The Mask

The Madness of King George is nominated in 1995.  I like that they gave the award to Interview but not much else.

Nighthawks

  1. Interview with the Vampire
  2. Ed Wood
  3. The Hudsucker Proxy
  4. The Madness of King George
  5. Bullets over Broadway

A slight step down from the last several years but still a really strong Top 5.

Best Visual Effects

Academy Awards

  • Forrest Gump
  • The Mask
  • True Lies

Oscar Score of 70.0.  I hadn’t seen Heavenly Creatures at the time of the Oscars but I had seen Stargate and was surprised it was passed over.  Gump was kind of a pioneer here – the Best Picture winner that had awards worthy effects.  Before Gump, no Picture winner had been nominated since 1970 and none had won since 1959 and those two (Ben Hur, Patton) were the only winners nominated in VE since 1942.  But after Gump three more Picture winners won VE over the next decade.  Of course, since then, no Picture winner has even been nominated, so it was a short-lived trend.

BAFTA

  • Forrest Gump
  • The Mask
  • Speed
  • True Lies

But then again, the BAFTAs had the same list, just adding Speed.

Nighthawks

  1. Heavenly Creatures
  2. Forrest Gump
  3. Stargate
  4. True Lies
  5. Interview with the Vampire

The Mask is my #6.  I was surprised, once I saw Heavenly Creatures, that neither group nominated its amazing effects, perhaps because they are such a smaller part of the film than for the other films.

Best Sound Editing

Academy Awards

  • Speed
  • Clear and Present Danger
  • Forrest Gump

An Oscar Score of 52.6.  Gump was the first Picture winner to be nominated in this category since 1967 (and like In the Heat of the Night, it lost).  It would wait until the next year for a film to win Picture and SEE.  However, a definite trend began here.  From 1994 to 2018, only three films have won Picture and SE but six films have won Picture and earned a nomination for SE without winning.

MPSE

  • Best Sound Editing:  Speed
  • Best ADR:  Forrest Gump
  • Best Editing – Foreign:  Leon
  • Best Editing – Music:  The Lion King
    • nominee:  Frankenstein
  • Best Editing – Animated:  The Lion King
    • nominee:  Once Upon a Forest

This is still before the MPSE explosion of the late 90’s, expanding the categories and greatly expanding the number of nominees in each category.

Nighthawks

  1. The Crow
  2. Heavenly Creatures
  3. Speed
  4. Leon
  5. Interview with the Vampire

I bumped Speed up a couple of spots from the Nighthawk Awards.  Tied with 1982 and 1993 for the second best Top 5 to-date though once we hit 1996 those will be left far behind.

Best Costume Design

Academy Awards

  • The Adventures of Priscilla
  • Bullets over Broadway
  • Little Women
  • Maverick
  • Queen Margot

An Oscar Score of 82.1.  Mostly good choices but the choice of Maverick is a bit odd as I don’t even think it had the best costumes for a Western in this year (that would be Wyatt Earp).  Was it all about that blue dress that Jodie Foster wears?  But I can’t understand the snub of Interview with the Vampire, which had outfits from three different centuries and was amazing with all of them.

BAFTA

  • The Adventures of Priscilla
  • Four Weddings and a Funeral
  • Interview with the Vampire
  • Little Women

The Madness of King George is nominated in 1995.  On the one hand, the BAFTAs did nominate Interview.  On the other hand, Four Weddings?  Is that just about Charlotte’s bizarre outfits?

Nighthawks

  1. Interview with the Vampire
  2. Queen Margot
  3. The Adventures of Priscilla
  4. The Madness of King George
  5. Bullets over Broadway

Little Women, which earned both Oscar and BAFTA noms, was my #6.  It’s a very good Top 5 but actually slightly weaker than the previous two years.

Best Makeup

Academy Awards

  • Ed Wood
  • Forrest Gump
  • Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

An Oscar Score of 54.5.  This predates the Academy longlists for the categories that had less than five nominees so I can’t know at what point these fucking idiots knocked out Interview with the Vampire which absolutely should have been nominated.

BAFTA

  • The Adventures of Priscilla
  • Interview with the Vampire
  • The Mask
  • Mrs. Doubtfire

The Madness of King George wins and Ed Wood is nominated in 1995

Nighthawks

  1. Ed Wood
  2. Interview with the Vampire
  3. The Adventures of Priscilla
  4. The Bride with White Hair
  5. Queen Margot

Best Original Song

Academy Awards

  • “Can You Feel the Love Tonight”  (The Lion King)
  • “Circle of Life”  (The Lion King)
  • “Hakuna Matata”  (The Lion King)
  • “Look What Love Has Done”  (Junior)
  • “Make Up Your Mind”  (The Paper)

An Oscar Score of 66.7 which is only compared against actual listed songs at Oscars.org, not my full list.  I can’t fathom how people thought “Can You Feel the Love Tonight” was better than “Circle of Life”, the brilliant song that both opens and closes The Lion King in high style.  What’s more, the Academy goes again with bland, boring, schmaltzy Carole Bayer Sager (“Look What Love Has Done”) and one of the most boring Randy Newman songs ever (“Make Up Your Mind”).

Golden Globes

  • “Can You Feel the Love Tonight”  (The Lion King)
  • “Circle of Life”  (The Lion King)
  • “The Color of Night”  (Color of Night)
  • “Far Longer Than Forever”  (The Swan Princess)
  • “I’ll Remember”  (With Honors)
  • “Look What Love Has Done”  (Junior)

“Color of Night” and “Far Longer Than Forever” aren’t much better than the what the Oscars did but at least the Globes nominated “I’ll Remember”, a really wonderful Madonna song (better than the film it was in).

Nighthawks

  1. “Circle of Life”  (The Lion King)
  2. “Can’t Even Tell”  (Clerks)
  3. “It Can’t Rain All the Time”  (The Crow)
  4. “I’ll Remember”  (With Honors)
  5. “Can You Feel the Love Tonight”  (The Lion King)

That’s actually a switch from the original Nighthawk Awards where I had “Can’t Even Tell” on top.  And it’s a brilliant song and I love it.  But “Circle of Life” is so brilliant and works so brilliantly in the film, I can’t deny it the top spot.  In fact, all three of my top songs close out their films in brilliant fashion, with the “Circle of Life” reprise, with Soul Asylum blaring out Dante finally going home and with the beautiful elegy for what we’ve seen in The Crow.  I know that both “Can’t Even Tell” and “It Can’t Rain All the Time” were written for the films even though oscars.org didn’t list either (so maybe they weren’t submitted) and the latter song is also key to some lines in the film.  If those get bounced, next on my list are “Hakuna Matata” and “Burn”, but that’s also from The Crow and also not listed (the only listed song was “The Big Empty”, my least favorite song on the soundtrack) in which case my final pick would be “Be Prepared”.  And, of course, “Stay (I Missed You”) would have been third if it had been written for Reality Bites which it technically wasn’t, which is too bad since it’s the only good thing about that god awful film.

Best Animated Film

The Annies

  • The Lion King
  • Batman: Mask of the Phantasm
  • Nightmare Before Christmas

The Swan Princess is nominated in 1995.  I don’t generally think of them in direct comparison since I classify them as different genres and they’re actually from different years, but I rate Nightmare Before Christmas as several points higher than Lion King.

LAFC

  • The Lion King

Nighthawks

  1. Grave of the Fireflies
  2. The Lion King

There still wasn’t much of a push yet to create this category at various awards groups.  Indeed, if the category even existed yet, it probably wouldn’t have been awarded.  There were only 12 animated films the whole year, four of which don’t appear to have gotten an L.A. release (including Grave of the Fireflies, my own winner) and only three that were actually on the Oscar Eligibility List (Lion King, Swan Princess, Thumbelina).  Of the three films nominated at the Annies two of them were actually from the year before (the Annies had different eligibility dates back then which they wouldn’t change until 2003).

Best Foreign Film

Consensus

  1. Red  –  220 points
  2. Eat Drink Man Woman  –  88 points
  3. Burnt by the Sun  –  60 points
  4. To Live  –  56 points
  5. Farinelli: Il Castrato  –  52 points

Red tied with Farewell My Concubine for the most nominations to-date (7) though Farewell was Oscar nominated and Red wasn’t eligible (well, it was submitted and then rejected).  Red is tied for second most wins to-date (5).  Its 220 points are the second most to-date (again, behind Farewell) and still ranks in the Top 10 through 2018, the second most for a film not eligible for Oscar nomination.

Academy Awards

  • Burnt by the Sun  (Russia)
  • Before the Rain  (Macedonia)
  • Eat Drink Man Woman  (Taiwan)
  • Farinelli: Il Castrato  (Italy)
  • Strawberry and Chocolate  (Cuba)

The Oscar Score is 45.5, the lowest since 1982 and of the lower years in the category’s history.  There were 46 films submitted and I have seen 39 of them.  Most of the nominees are actually pretty solid except for Farinelli which is the one of the weakest submissions of the year and the weakest nominee since 1986.  But Red was submitted (and rejected) and White was submitted and passed over and they are the two best Foreign films of the year.  Even setting aside Red, that makes White the best Foreign Film of the year and it was submitted and not nominated.  It’s rare enough that the best submitted film isn’t nominated and it hadn’t been since 1982 that the best film was submitted and wasn’t nominated.

Critics

  • NYFC:  Red
  • LAFC:  Red
  • NSFC:  Red
  • BSFC:  Red
  • CFC:  Red
    • The Boys of St Vincent
    • Four Weddings and a Funeral
    • Heavenly Creatures
    • White
  • NBR:  Eat Drink Man Woman
    • Queen Margot
    • Red
    • Strawberry and Chocolate
    • To Live

Red’s obvious domination here just makes the eventual Oscar rejection look stupid and petty.  The CFC is one of those groups that clearly decides that not being from America makes you foreign with a Canadian film, a British film and a New Zealand film.  Red is the first film to win five critics awards and only All About My Mother and Y Tu Mama Tambien have done it since.

BAFTA

  • To Live
  • Belle epoque
  • Eat Drink Man Woman
  • Red

Burnt by the Sun is nominated in 1995.  It’s too bad Red doesn’t win but this is a very strong group of nominees.

Golden Globes

  • Farinelli
  • Eat Drink Man Woman
  • Queen Margot
  • Red
  • To Live

One of the dumbest choices the Globes has ever made.  The four nominees average an 88.  The winner is a 60.

Independent Spirits (International Film)

  • Red
  • The Blue Kite
  • The Boys of St. Vincent
  • Ladybird Ladybird
  • Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould

For the record, that’s one French / Swiss film, a Chinese film, two Canadian films (in English) and a British film.

Nighthawks

  1. Red
  2. White
  3. Eat Drink Man Woman
  4. Mina Tannenbaum
  5. Il Postino

The best Top 5 since 1973 and the first time there have been four **** films since 1963.  It continues past these Top 5 as well with the next five (Queen Margot, Before the Rain, Burnt by the Sun, To Live, La Separation) giving this year the best Top 10 since 1957 and there won’t be a better one until 2002.

Total Points

Academy Awards

  1. Forrest Gump  –  580
  2. Pulp Fiction  –  295
  3. Bullets over Broadway  –  240
  4. The Shawshank Redemption  –  220
  5. Quiz Show  –  165
  6. The Madness of King George  –  145
  7. Red  –  110
  8. Speed  –  105
  9. Four Weddings and a Funeral  –  90
  10. The Lion King  /  Legends of the Fall  –  90

notes

  • The 580 points for Forrest Gump are the second most since 1961.
  • The 13 nominations for Forrest Gump tied five other films for the second most all-time (today tied with 8 other films for 4th most all-time).
  • The 240 points for Bullets are Broadway were (and still are) the 7th most for a film without a Best Picture nomination.
  • The 90 points and 2 nominations for Four Weddings and a Funeral are both the lowest for a Best Picture nominee since 1951.

BAFTA

  1. The Madness of King George  –  520  (1995)
  2. Four Weddings and a Funeral  –  515
  3. Pulp Fiction  –  375
  4. Forrest Gump  –  290
  5. The Adventures of Priscilla  –  195
  6. Quiz Show  –  160
  7. Red  –  140
  8. Backbeat  –  120
  9. Interview with the Vampire  –  115
  10. Speed  –  110

note:  The 14 nominations for The Madness of King George tied A Room with a View for the second most to this point and is still tied at the third most with several films.

Golden Globes

  1. Forrest Gump  –  385
  2. Pulp Fiction  –  270
  3. Four Weddings and a Funeral  –  195
  4. The Lion King  –  180
  5. Quiz Show  –  165
  6. Legends of the Fall  –  155
  7. Ed Wood  –  140
  8. Nell  –  110
  9. The Adventures of Priscilla  –  85
  10. Pret-a-Porter  /  Junior  –  80

note:  Forrest Gump‘s 385 points are the highest in nine years.

Critics

  1. Pulp Fiction  –  1301
  2. Ed Wood  –  522
  3. Forrest Gump  –  247
  4. Bullets over Broadway  –  228
  5. Red  –  188
  6. Nobody’s Fool  –  133
  7. Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle  –  126
  8. Tom & Viv  –  104
  9. Quiz Show  –  100
  10. Hoop Dreams  –  90

note:  Pulp Fiction would be #4 all-time upon release and even today is #6 all-time.

raw total, by group

  • NYFC:  Pulp Fiction  –  170
  • LAFC:  Pulp Fiction  –  340
  • NSFC:  Pulp Fiction  –  270
  • BSFC:  Pulp Fiction  –  270
  • CFC:  Pulp Fiction  –  170
  • NBR:  Forrest Gump  –  190

note:  Pulp Fiction missed by 40 points being the first film to lead all six groups.  L.A. Confidential would be the first to do that three years later.

Guilds

  1. Forrest Gump  –  585
  2. The Shawshank Redemption  –  280
  3. Pulp Fiction  –  215
  4. Four Weddings and a Funeral  –  175
  5. Quiz Show  –  165
  6. The Lion King  –  140
  7. Bullets over Broadway  –  130
  8. Ed Wood  –  100
  9. Speed  –  85
  10. True Lies  –  75

Thanks in part to the first SAG Awards, Forrest Gump sets new guilds records for wins (7), noms (11) and points (585) though it actually has a smaller percentage of the points than Schindler’s List the year before.  All of its records fall in either 1996 or 1997.

Nighthawks

  1. Ed Wood  –  540
  2. Pulp Fiction   –  310
  3. The Shawshank Redemption  –  265
  4. Red  –  225
  5. Bullets over Broadway  –  165
  6. Quiz Show  –  155
  7. Interview with the Vampire  –  150
  8. Four Weddings and a Funeral  –  145
  9. Heavenly Creatures  –  130
  10. Grave of the Fireflies  /  The Lion King  –  100

Drama

  1. Pulp Fiction  –  390
  2. Quiz Show  –  295
  3. The Shawshank Redemption  –  245
  4. Red  –  165
  5. Heavenly Creatures  /  The Madness of King George  –  135

Comedy

  1. Ed Wood  –  400
  2. Four Weddings and a Funeral  –  270
  3. Bullets over Broadway  –  255
  4. The Hudsucker Proxy  –  145
  5. The Adventures of Priscilla  –  125

Raw Points

  1. Pulp Fiction  –  2456
  2. Forrest Gump  –  2087
  3. Four Weddings and a Funeral  –  975
  4. Ed Wood  –  887
  5. Quiz Show  –  755
  6. The Madness of King George  –  705
  7. Bullets over Broadway  –  698
  8. The Shawshank Redemption  –  575
  9. The Lion King  –  540
  10. Red  –  458

Weighted Points

  1. Pulp Fiction  –  2381
  2. Forrest Gump  –  1952
  3. Four Weddings and a Funeral  –  919
  4. Ed Wood  –  848
  5. Quiz Show  –  706
  6. The Madness of King George  –  701
  7. Bullets over Broadway  –  673
  8. The Shawshank Redemption  –  532
  9. The Lion King  –  490
  10. Red  –  454

notes

  • Pulp Fiction‘s total is the 3rd highest to-date.  Forrest Gump‘s total is the 9th highest to-date.
  • Pulp Fiction‘s 44 nominations are the third highest to-date and Forrest Gump‘s 43 are the fourth highest.