A Century of Film

Actor

Lead actors, of course, have been a part of film since its history began and certainly since feature films began.  Even then, there was a great range to them.  The three greatest actors of the Silent Era were a clown, a Horror star and a man who would so straight Drama: Chaplin, Chaney and Jannings.  All three of them proved that you didn’t have to be a matinee star to be a great actor though many of the stars who would arise in the first decade of the Sound Era, stars like March, Howard, Gable and Cagney proved that it didn’t hurt if they liked how you looked either.

An award for Best Actor began in the first year of the Oscars and it went to Emil Jannings for two roles, one of which is now lost.  The New York Film Critics would start their own award in 1935 with the NBR catching up in 1945.  The Golden Globes began with Best Actor in their first year (1943) but it took the BAFTAs a few years before they added acting (though they added two categories).  Strangely enough, it would take all the way until 1994 before SAG finally giving out their own awards.

Today, it’s the premiere award, of course, among actors.  Yes, there would be great actors like Richard Burton and Peter O’Toole who would never win no matter how many nominations they received or stars like Cary Grant who struggled to even earn nominations (and wouldn’t for his best work).

There is no real male equivalent to Meryl Streep.  There is Jack, of course, and he will dominate many of the lists.  But Jack is basically retired now and didn’t do much after the age of 60 (when he won his third Oscar) while for Meryl, turning 60 barely slowed her down and Meryl won her first Oscar at age 30 and was already rising up the lists while it would take Jack until the age of 32 just to rise out of the B-movies he had been working in for a decade to become a star.

note:  A note on the years.  Because I use the Academy calendar for all of my awards but often have people asking about the actual release year of a film, any film with two dates listed, the first is its original release date and the second is the year it was Oscar eligible and thus Nighthawk eligible.  Down below, I only use one date when referencing awards and that’s the year the film was eligible for that award, which might not be its original release year or its Oscar year, depending on the award in question.

note:  Critical Acclaim.  That’s a phrase I will use below several times.  So that I don’t have to keep repeating what it means, it’s based on the Consensus Awards that I do.  My feelings don’t play into those awards except by the percentages I assign.  70 points for a win, 35 for a nomination.  100% for the Oscars, SAG, BAFTA, NYFC, LAFC, 90% for the BSFC, CFC, NSFC, 80% for the BFCA, NBR, 70% for the Globes.  Then, I calculate percentage of the total points.  That’s because in 1943 (the first year of the Globes) there were 329 total points and in 2011 there were 1505 total points, so the percentage of the total points is the best way to account for historical changes in scores.  So, the performance with the highest percentage of the year’s total points has the most critical acclaim under the definition I am using.

My Top 5 Actor Performances in Film History:

  1. Marlon Brando, A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951
  2. Peter O’Toole, Lawrence of Arabia, 1962
  3. Alec Guinness, The Bridge on the River Kwai, 1957
  4. Jack Nicholson, Chinatown, 1974
  5. Robert De Niro, Raging Bull, 1980

The other 9 Point Performances (chronological by Nighthawk eligibility):

  • James Stewart, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, 1939
  • Henry Fonda, The Grapes of Wrath, 1940
  • Orson Welles, Citizen Kane, 1941
  • Humphrey Bogart, The Maltese Falcon, 1941
  • James Cagney, Yankee Doodle Dandy, 1942
  • Humphrey Bogart, Casablanca, 1942/1943
  • Ray Milland, The Lost Weekend, 1945
  • James Stewart, It’s a Wonderful Life, 1946
  • Humphrey Bogart, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, 1948
  • William Holden, Sunset Blvd., 1950
  • Marlon Brando, On the Waterfront, 1954
  • Orson Welles, Touch of Evil, 1958
  • Takashi Shimura, Ikiru, 1952/1960
  • Jack Lemmon, The Apartment, 1960
  • Paul Newman, The Hustler, 1961
  • Gunnar Bjornstrand, Winter Light, 1963
  • Rod Steiger, The Pawnbroker, 1965
  • Richard Burton, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, 1966
  • Warren Beatty, Bonnie and Clyde, 1967
  • Peter O’Toole, The Lion in Winter, 1968
  • Marlon Brando, Last Tango in Paris, 1972/1973
  • Al Pacino, Serpico, 1973
  • Jack Nicholson, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, 1975
  • Al Pacino, Dog Day Afternoon, 1975
  • Robert De Niro, Taxi Driver, 1976
  • Robert De Niro, Raging Bull, 1980
  • Warren Beatty, Reds, 1981
  • Tom Hulce, Amadeus, 1984
  • William Hurt, Kiss of the Spider Woman, 1985
  • Dustin Hoffman, Rain Man, 1988
  • Daniel Day-Lewis, My Left Foot, 1989
  • Anthony Hopkins, The Silence of the Lambs, 1991
  • Clint Eastwood, Unforgiven, 1992
  • Daniel Day-Lewis, In the Name of the Father, 1993
  • Anthony Hopkins, The Remains of the Day, 1993
  • Nicolas Cage, Leaving Las Vegas, 1995
  • Ralph Fiennes, The English Patient, 1996
  • Ian McKellen, Gods and Monsters, 1998
  • Kevin Spacey, American Beauty, 1999
  • Tom Wilkinson, In the Bedroom, 2001
  • Daniel Day-Lewis, Gangs of New York, 2002
  • Adrien Brody, The Pianist, 2002
  • Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood, 2007
  • Sean Penn, Milk, 2008

note:  I rate all aspects of film on a 9 point scale.  They also correspond to the 100 point scale for Best Picture.  Films above *** (76-99) all land on the scale.  1 point is for 76-79, just worth mentioning.  2 points is for 80-83, a weak mention, 3 points is for 84-87, near great, 4 points is for 88-89 (which is ****), a solid nominee, 5 points is for 90-91, a very solid nominee, 6 points is for 92-93, a weak winner, a 7 points is for 94-95, a worthwhile winner, 8 points is 96-97, the kind of winner you can’t complain about even if it’s not your #1 choice and 9 points is for 98-99, the very best of all-time.  The above list are my 9 point films for Actress through 2011, listed chronologically.

Best Performances All-Time by Decade:

  • 1920’s:  Lon Chaney, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, 1923
  • 1930’s:  James Stewart, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, 1939
  • 1940’s:  Orson Welles, Citizen Kane, 1941
  • 1950’s:  Marlon Brando, A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951
  • 1960’s:  Peter O’Toole, Lawrence of Arabia, 1962
  • 1970’s:  Jack Nicholson, Chinatown, 1974
  • 1980’s:  Robert De Niro, Raging Bull, 1980
  • 1990’s:  Anthony Hopkins, The Silence of the Lambs, 1991
  • 2000’s:  Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood, 2007
  • 2010’s:  Colin Firth, The King’s Speech, 2010

Best Performance All-Time by Age:

note:  Age is based on subtracting the year they were born from the year the film was originally released.  I’m not going to try to figure out when the birthday is or when the film was made.

  • pre-teen:  Daniel Radcliffe, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, 2001, 12
  • teenager:  Jamie Bell, Billy Elliot, 2000, 14
  • 20’s:  Marlon Brando, A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951, 27
  • 30’s:  Peter O’Toole, Lawrence of Arabia, 1962, 30
  • 40’s:  Alec Guinness, The Bridge on the River Kwai, 1957, 43
  • 50’s:  Anthony Hopkins, The Silence of the Lambs, 1991, 54
  • 60’s:  Clint Eastwood, Unforgiven, 1992, 62
  • 70’s:  Victor Sjostrom, Wild Strawberries, 1957, 78
  • 80’s:  Erland Josephson, Saraband, 2003, 80

Best Performance All-Time by Genre:

  • Action:  Gene Hackman, The French Connection, 1971
  • Adventure:  Humphrey Bogart, The African Queen, 1951
  • Comedy:  Jack Lemmon, The Apartment, 1960
  • Crime:  Warren Beatty, Bonnie and Clyde, 1967
  • Drama:  Marlon Brando, A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951
  • Fantasy:  Jim Carrey, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, 2004
  • Horror:  Robert De Niro, Taxi Driver, 1976
  • Kids:  Gregory Peck, The Yearling, 1946
  • Musical:  James Cagney, Yankee Doodle Dandy, 1942
  • Mystery:  Jack Nicholson, Chinatown, 1974
  • Sci-Fi:  Hugh Jackman, The Fountain, 2006
  • Suspense:  Anthony Hopkins, The Silence of the Lambs, 1991
  • War:  Alec Guinness, The Bridge on the River Kwai, 1957
  • Western:  Humphrey Bogart, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, 1948

note:  Adventure, Fantasy, Mystery and Suspense have the same film that Actress did for this list.

The Actors

Fredric March

The first truly great actor of the Sound Era and thus the Awards Era.  He would eventually win two Oscars.  He would earn five Oscar nominations in all.  He would be first place in Nighthawk points from 1937 to 1939 and then again briefly in 1946.
Key Films:  A Star is Born, The Best Years of Our Lives, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Spencer Tracy

Though I have never been a fan of Spencer Tracy and his understated his acting, there’s no getting around his importance in this category.  He was the first to win two Best Actors Oscars and he did it in back-to-back years (even if neither choice is a good one).  He would earn 10 Oscar nominations in all, all in the lead category, which still leaves him in 1st place for the Best Actor category even after all this time.
Key Films:  Boys Town, Captains Courageous, Bad Day at Black Rock

Laurence Olivier

The premiere theatrical actor of his generation or, really, any generation.  Lots of actors have been knighted over the years but Olivier was the first one ever to be made a life peer (thus he is Lord Laurence Olivier).  He brought Shakespeare to the screen in resplendent fashion as both an actor and director and earned nine lead Oscar nominations.
Key Films:  Hamlet, Henry V, Richard III, Wuthering Heights

Marlon Brando

Brando didn’t invent the method and he wasn’t even the first major method actor on screen (Montgomery Clift had him beaten there) but he brought a new level of intensity to screen acting.  His iconic work as Stanley Kowalski didn’t win him the Oscar but it was the first of a still-record four straight Oscar nominations that did culminate in his first Oscar and he would earn a second one 18 years later.
Key Films:  A Streetcar Named Desire, On the Waterfront, Last Tango in Paris, The Godfather

Paul Newman

The ultimate combination (among males) of stunning good looks and incredible acting ability.  Newman continued to rack up Oscar nominations for years (four in a decade then two more almost 15 years later) before the Academy finally gave him an Oscar, not realizing he would be back for another nomination just before turning 70.
Key Films:  The Hustler, Hud, The Verdict, The Color of Money

Dustin Hoffman

Hoffman helped herald in a new generation of actors with their intense devotion to the method, an almost anti-Hollywood generation that would rebel against the system before finally settling in to get their awards, which in Hoffman’s case includes two Oscars and five other nominations.
Key Films:  Rain Man, Midnight Cowboy, The Graduate, Kramer vs. Kramer

Jack Nicholson

As mentioned above, Jack toiled in B-movies for the likes of Roger Corman for almost a decade before earning his first Oscar nomination (in supporting).  While earning three straight nominations in the 70’s and winning an Oscar, Jack also proved he wasn’t too egotistical to take the back seat and he would earn his next two nominations in supporting (including a second Oscar) before going back for four more lead nominations including a third Oscar, just the second male to win three and the first with a supporting Oscar to win two lead Oscars.
Key Films:  Chinatown, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Five Easy Pieces, As Good as It Gets

Robert De Niro

De Niro exploded out of the gate, winning a supporting Oscar, then earning two nominations before winning his lead, all in just seven years.  He continued to be an important lead for the next decade before coming back with back-to-back Oscar nominations at the start of the 90’s.  Later in his career, he has taken an interesting turn and proven that he can actually do Comedy as well, earning a Globe nom for Comedy.
Key Films:  Raging Bull, Taxi Driver, The Deer Hunter, GoodFellas

Denzel Washington

Denzel came out of television, working on St. Elsewhere and then earning a supporting Oscar nom before winning an Oscar in supporting.  After that came the lead roles, including two performances that people thought would win him that lead Oscar before he finally did win that lead Oscar (for one of the worst performances of his career).
Key Films:  Malcolm X, The Hurricane, Training Day

Daniel Day-Lewis

The most intense and devoted actor of this generation.  Day-Lewis appeared on the scene in supporting performances then graduated quickly to leads and then won an Oscar at the age of 32 for My Left Foot.  Since then, his lead roles have been few and far between but that wouldn’t stop him from a performance that won basically everything but the Oscar before winning his second lead Oscar.
Key Films:  There Will Be Blood, My Left Foot, Gangs of New York


The Academy Awards

Summary:

This was one of the initial categories at the 1st Academy Awards, of course, with Emil Jannings winning the Oscar for both The Last Command and The Way of All Flesh (the only lost film with an Oscar winning acting performance).  Some of the bigger MGM stars would win early Oscars (Lionel Barrymore, Wallace Beery) but Fredric March was the first major actor to win.  In 1936-37, we would get the first revenge win (in 36, Paul Muni beat Spencer tracy, in 37, the opposite), Tracy would become the first back-to-back winner in 37-38 and he and Muni would lead in points until 1945.  But, after March and Gary Cooper leading for a stretch, Tracy would eventually take over for good.

The Oscars liked the under-stated actors like Tracy (10 noms, 2 wins), Cooper (5 noms, 2 wins) and Gregory Peck (5 noms, one win) with all three of them earning noms three years in a row at various points.  But they also would embrace the method actors when they arose, giving Brando four straight noms (the only actor in history), three to Montgomery Clift and back-to-back posthumous noms for James Dean.  But they never really decided what they preferred with the top three point totals going to an under-stated studio actor (Tracy), the foremost theatrical actor (Olivier) and an actor of the New Hollywood who wasn’t method but could react to it (Nicholson).

Indeed, though Nicholson wasn’t the first of the new generation to earn a nomination (Beatty and Hoffman were both nominated three years earlier) or even the first to win (Hackman was, even if he was a few years older), he would become the best and the biggest of a celebrated group that arose in the 70’s (which also included De Niro and Pacino).  What’s more, they were all willing to do smaller roles as well with Nicholson, De Niro and Hackman all winning supporting Oscars as well.

Eventually a younger group would rise up and again it was a mix of the under-stated (Tom Hanks) and much more intense actors (Daniel Day-Lewis, Sean Penn), all of whom have won multiple Oscars.

Multiple Nominations:

Like with all acting categories, a film can earn multiple nominations in this category.  Until 1953, the only films to earn multiple nominations were The Mutiny on the Bounty (the only film with three, none won) and Going My Way (one won and the other was really supporting), two complete oddities.  Since 1984, no film has managed multiple nominations.  But from 1953 to 1984 there were three films that won the award and earned a second nomination and seven films that earned two nominations but with neither winning the award.

Directors:

George Cukor is often thought of as a female’s director because of how many Oscar winning and nominated performances he directed but he is the only director to direct 3 Oscar winning Best Actor performances (The Philadelphia Story, A Double Life, My Fair Lady) and he directed 7 total nominees.  He is matched there by Stanley Kramer who was notable for doing it with just 5 films, the only director to twice have multiple nominees (Judgment at Nuremberg, The Defiant Ones).  Sidney Lumet, who never won an Oscar, has the record with the most nominations (8) though only one winner.  Three other notable directors directed 2 winners and 6 total nominees each (Zinnemann, Wilder, Scorsese).

Sequels:

Three sequels have earned nominations.  The first time, Bing Crosby was nominated for a role where he already won an Oscar (The Bells of St. Mary’s), the second time Al Pacino was nominated for a role where he had been nominated in supporting previously (The Godfather Part II) and the third time Paul Newman won the Oscar for a role he had only been nominated for the first time (The Color of Money).

Genres:

Not dominating as much as in the female acting categories, but still dominating, Drama accounts for 61.29% of the nominated films and 61.63% of the winners.  Comedy is the only other genre over 7% of the nominees of 9% of the winners (13.40% of the nominated films, 10.47% of the winners).  Fantasy, Kids and Sci-Fi have never won the award and the latter two only have one nominee each (as does Action, but that film (The French Connection) won the Oscar).  Suspense and Horror also only have one winner each.  Only five genres have more than two winners: Drama (53), Comedy (9), Musical (7), War and Western (4 each).

Best Picture:

Actor and Picture have gone hand in hand since almost the beginning with 27 films winning both awards.  More importantly, there have almost always been nominations of the two.  From 1966 to 1980, every Best Picture winner was nominated for Actor and from 1957 to 1980 the only three Picture winners not nominated for Actor were Musicals (Gigi, West Side Story, Sound of Music).  Of the 85 Picture winners, 54 at least earned a Picture nomination.  What’s more, only 21 of the Actor winners weren’t from Picture nominees.  There have been a total of 215 films nominated for both awards and only in 1927-28 and 2006 were none of the Best Actor nominees from a Picture nominee.  In four years, all the Actor nominees came from Picture nominees, though only once, in 1966, did they match 5-5 (in two years, 1942 and 1943, there were 10 Picture nominees and in 1964, two of the Actor nominees came from the same film).

Foreign Films:

Ten performances from Foreign films have earned Oscar nominations but sadly, only Robert Benigni has won the award.  Six of the films were Italian and Marcello Mastroianni has been nominated three times and Javier Bardem twice.

Single Nominations:

53 films have earned an Actor nomination but no other nominations with only five of them winning the award, spaced out considerably (1928, 1950, 1968, 1987, 2006).  Since 1930, the only years with more than two nominees that were their film’s sole nomination was 2006 when there were four and 1987 when there were three.

Other Categories:

By far the biggest overlap with another category is Picture with 215 films nominated for both, followed by Director (187) and Adapted Screenplay (165) with nothing else over 150.  Surprisingly enough, no film has ever won both Actor and Sound Editing.

The Academy Awards Top 10:

  1. Spencer Tracy  –  385
  2. Laurence Olivier  –  350
  3. Jack Nicholson  –  350
  4. Marlon Brando  –  315
  5. Paul Newman  –  315
  6. Dustin Hoffman  –  315
  7. Jack Lemmon  –  280
  8. Peter O’Toole  –  280
  9. Frederic March  –  245
  10. Gary Cooper  /  Tom Hanks  /  Sean Penn  –  245

note:  Of the actors listed above, all but O’Toole have an Oscar and all but Olivier, Newman and O’Toole have two.

Top 5 Oscar Winners:

  1. Alec Guinness  (The Bridge on the River Kwai)
  2. Robert De Niro  (Raging Bull)
  3. Anthony Hopkins  (The Silence of the Lambs)
  4. Jack Nicholson  (One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest)
  5. Daniel Day-Lewis  (My Left Foot)

Worst 5 Oscar Winners:

  1. Wallace Beery  (The Champ)
  2. Denzel Washington  (Training Day)
  3. Spencer Tracy  (Captains Courageous)
  4. Warner Baxter  (In Old Arizona)
  5. Roberto Benigni  (Life is Beautiful)

Worst 5 Oscar Nominees:

  1. Richard Dix  (Cimarron)
  2. Jackie Cooper  (Skippy)
  3. Wallace Beery  (The Champ)
  4. Maurice Chevalier  (The Love Parade)
  5. Brad Pitt  (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button)

10 Best Performances Not Nominated for an Oscar:

  1. Humphrey Bogart  (The Treasure of the Sierra Madre)
  2. Orson Welles  (Touch of Evil)
  3. Takashi Shimura  (Ikiru)
  4. Gunnar Bjornstrand  (Winter Light)
  5. Humphrey Bogart  (The Maltese Falcon)
  6. Orson Welles  (Chimes at Midnight)
  7. Charlie Chaplin  (Modern Times)
  8. Peter Lorre  (M)
  9. William Holden  (The Wild Bunch)
  10. Johnny Depp  (Ed Wood)

5 Most Acclaimed Performances to not Win the Oscar (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. Burt Lancaster, 1981, Atlantic City
  2. Laurence Olivier, 1946, Henry V
  3. Bob Hoskins, 1986, Mona Lisa
  4. Bill Murray, 2003, Lost in Translation
  5. Ralph Richardson, 1952, The Sound Barrier

note:  Richardson managed that without even earning an Oscar nomination.
note:  I didn’t count four performances that would have landed on this list between Hoskins and Murray when there were only two awards, for people who won the NYFC and earned an Oscar nom but not the win: Paul Muni (1937, The Life of Emile Zola), James Cagney (1938, Angels with Dirty Faces), James Stewart (1939, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington), Charlie Chaplin (1940, The Great Dictator).

5 Least Acclaimed Performances to Win the Oscar (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. Al Pacino, 1992, Scent of a Woman
  2. Charlton Heston, 1959, Ben Hur
  3. William Holden, 1953, Stalag 17
  4. Art Carney, 1974, Harry and Tonto
  5. Tom Hanks, 1993, Philadelphia

5 Least Acclaimed Performances to Earn an Oscar Nomination (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. Tommy Lee Jones, 2007, In the Valley of Elah
  2. Ed Harris, 2000, Pollock
  3. Clint Eastwood, 2004, Million Dollar Baby
  4. Edward Norton, 1998, American History X
  5. Laurence Fishburne, 1993, What’s Love Got to Do With It

5 Most Acclaimed Performances to not earn an Oscar nomination (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. Ralph Richardson, 1952, The Sound Barrier
  2. Steve Martin, 1987, Roxanne
  3. Paul Giamatti, 2004, Sideways
  4. Spencer Tracy, 1953, The Actress
  5. Steve Martin, 1984, All of Me

Top 5 Oscar Years:

  1. 2002  (Adrien Brody (The Pianist)Daniel Day-Lewis (Gangs of New York), Michael Caine (The Quiet American), Nicolas Cage (Adaptation), Jack Nicholson (About Schmidt))
  2. 1993  (Tom Hanks (Philadelphia)Daniel Day-Lewis (In the Name of the Father), Anthony Hopkins (The Remains of the Day), Liam Neeson (Schindler’s List), Laurence Fishburne (What’s Love Got to Do With It))
  3. 1982  (Ben Kingsley (Gandhi)Paul Newman (The Verdict), Dustin Hoffman (Tootsie), Jack Lemmon (Missing), Peter O’Toole (My Favorite Year))
  4. 2007  (Daniel Day-Lewis (There Will Be Blood)George Clooney (Michael Clayton), Johnny Depp (Sweeney Todd), Viggo Mortensen (Eastern Promises), Tommy Lee Jones (In the Valley of Elah))
  5. 1979  (Dustin Hoffman (Kramer vs. Kramer)Peter Sellers (Being There), Roy Scheider (All That Jazz), Jack Lemmon (The China Syndrome), Al Pacino (And Justice for All))

Top 5 Oscars Years by Oscar Score:

  1. 2002  –  100  (Adrien Brody (The Pianist)Daniel Day-Lewis (Gangs of New York), Michael Caine (The Quiet American), Nicolas Cage (Adaptation), Jack Nicholson (About Schmidt))
  2. 2007  –  100  (Daniel Day-Lewis (There Will Be Blood)George Clooney (Michael Clayton), Johnny Depp (Sweeney Todd), Viggo Mortensen (Eastern Promises), Tommy Lee Jones (In the Valley of Elah))
  3. 1979  –  100  (Dustin Hoffman (Kramer vs. Kramer)Peter Sellers (Being There), Roy Scheider (All That Jazz), Jack Lemmon (The China Syndrome), Al Pacino (And Justice for All))
  4. 2009  –  100  (Jeff Bridges (Crazy Heart), Jeremy Renner (The Hurt Locker), Colin Firth (A Single Man), George Clooney (Up in the Air), Morgan Freeman (Invictus))
  5. 2010  –  100  (Colin Firth (The King’s Speech), Jeff Bridges (True Grit), Jesse Eisenberg (The Social Network), Javier Bardem (Biutiful), James Franco (127 Hours))

note:  The difference between this list and the previous one is that the first one is a flat total based on my 9 point scale.  In this one, it’s comparing my top five performances to the ones the Oscars actually nominated.  So, in the first one, it’s how good are the nominees.  In this one it’s how good are the nominees compared to who else was eligible. I listed them in descending order of how good I think the Top 5 are, since they all have the same score.  Actually, the last three even have the same score, so they went chronologically.
note:  Also, a perfect score of 100 doesn’t guarantee that those are also my nominees.  My #5 might have the same score as an actress who was nominated.
note:  There is a sixth perfect 100 – 1978, but it has a lower overall score for the 5 nominees than these five years.

Worst 5 Oscar Years:

  1. 1928-29  (Warner Baxter (In Old Arizona), George Bancroft (Thunderbolt), Chester Morris (Alibi), Paul Muni (The Valiant), Lewis Stone (The Patriot))
  2. 1929-30  (George Arliss (Disraeli), George Arliss (The Green Goddess), Ronald Colman (Bulldog Drummond  /  Condemned), Lawrence Tibbitt (The Rogue Song), Maurice Chevalier (The Big Pond / The Love Parade), Wallace Beery (The Big House))
  3. 1930-31  (Lionel Barrymore (A Free Soul), Adolph Menjou (The Front Page), Fredric March (The Royal Family of Broadway), Jackie Cooper (Skippy), Richard Dix (Cimarron))
  4. 1931-32  (Fredric March (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde), Wallace Beery (The Champ), Alfred Lunt (The Guardsman))
  5. 1945  (Ray Milland (The Lost Weekend), Gene Kelly (Anchors Aweigh), Gregory Peck (The Keys of the Kingdom), Bing Crosby (The Bells of St. Mary’s), Cornel Wilde (A Song to Remember))

Worst 5 Oscar Years by Oscar Score:

  1. 1928-29  –  12.5  (Warner Baxter (In Old Arizona), George Bancroft (Thunderbolt), Chester Morris (Alibi), Paul Muni (The Valiant), Lewis Stone (The Patriot))
  2. 1929-30  –  25.0  (George Arliss (Disraeli), George Arliss (The Green Goddess), Ronald Colman (Bulldog Drummond  /  Condemned), Lawrence Tibbitt (The Rogue Song), Maurice Chevalier (The Big Pond / The Love Parade), Wallace Beery (The Big House))
  3. 1930-31  –  40.0  (Lionel Barrymore (A Free Soul), Adolph Menjou (The Front Page), Fredric March (The Royal Family of Broadway), Jackie Cooper (Skippy), Richard Dix (Cimarron))
  4. 1931-32  –  41.2  (Fredric March (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde), Wallace Beery (The Champ), Alfred Lunt (The Guardsman))
  5. 2001  –  54.1  (Denzel Washington (Training Day), Tom Wilkinson (In the Bedroom), Russell Crowe (A Beautiful Mind), Will Smith (Ali), Sean Penn (I Am Sam))

Oscar Scores by Decade:

  • 1920’s:  70.8
  • 1930’s:  68.8
  • 1940’s:  75.0
  • 1950’s:  80.8
  • 1960’s:  80.8
  • 1970’s:  91.5
  • 1980’s:  88.6
  • 1990’s:  84.6
  • 2000’s:  87.1
  • 2010’s:  98.6
  • All-Time:  83.7

Top 5 Films to win the Oscar (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. The Godfather
  2. The Bridge on the River Kwai
  3. The Silence of the Lambs
  4. Raging Bull
  5. The Best Years of Our Lives

Worst 5 Films to win the Oscar  (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. Training Day
  2. Scent of a Woman
  3. Charly
  4. The Champ
  5. True Grit

Worst 5 Films to earn an Oscar nomination (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. Cleopatra
  2. I Am Sam
  3. Love Story
  4. Training Day
  5. Sling Blade

Years in Which the Worst of the Nominees Won the Oscar:

  • 1937  –  Spencer Tracy (Captains Courageous) over Fredric March, Paul Muni, Robert Montgomery, Charles Boyer
  • 1938  –  Spencer Tracy (Boys Town) over Leslie Howard, James Cagney, Charles Boyer, Robert Donat
  • 1968  –  Cliff Robertson (Charly) over Peter O’Toole, Alan Arkin, Alan Bates, Ron Moody
  • 1969  –  John Wayne (True Grit) over Dustin Hoffman, Jon Voight, Richard Burton, Peter O’Toole
  • 1974  –  Art Carney (Harry and Tonto) over Jack Nicholson, Al Pacino, Dustin Hoffman, Albert Finney
  • 1992  –  Al Pacino (Scent of a Woman) over Clint Eastwood, Denzel Washington, Stephen Rea, Robert Downey Jr
  • 1998  –  Roberto Benigni (Life is Beautiful) over Ian McKellen, Tom Hanks, Nick Nolte, Edward Norton
  • 2001  –  Denzel Washington (Training Day) over Tom Wilkinson, Russell Crowe, Will Smith, Sean Penn

Oscar Oddities and Tidbits:

  • Emil Jannings, The Way of All Flesh, 1928
    • One of the two films Jannings wins the initial Oscar for is the only lost Oscar winning performance.
  • Wallace Beery, The Champ, 1933
    • Finishes one vote behind Fredric March.  Academy declares a tie.  Read more here.
  • Spencer Tracy, Captains Courageous, 1937
    • The first “revenge” winner, in that he lost the previous year but won this year over the previous year’s winner (Paul Muni).
  • Spencer Tracy, Boys Town, 1938
    • The first repeat Oscar winner.  Also, the first actor nominated three straight years.
  • Gary Cooper, Sergeant York, 1941
    • The seventh NYFC winner but the first to also win the Oscar (the first six all earned noms but lost).
  • Barry Fitzgerald, Going My Way, 1944
    • Nominated for both Actor and Supporting Actor for the same performance (rules changed after this to prevent it) – wins the latter
  • Ray Milland, The Lost Weekend, 1945
    • The first sweep winner of four awards (in the first year of the NBR).
  • William Holden, Stalag 17, 1953
    • The last winner to date with no other nominations (and indeed, the last winner without at least a Globe nom).
  • Marlon Brando, On the Waterfront, 1954
    • The first (and only) four straight nominee.
  • Ernest Borgnine, Marty, 1955
    • The first sweep winner of 5 awards.
  • Yul Brynner, The King and I, 1956
    • The only Globe – Comedy / Musical loser to go on to win the Oscar.
  • Alec Guinness, The Bridge on the River Kwai, 1957
    • The second sweep winner of 5 awards and the last sweep winner until 2006 because of the addition of new awards.
  • Jack Lemmon, Save the Tiger, 1973
    • The last winner with no other wins.
  • Jack Nicholson / Al Pacino, 1973-75
    • The only stretch of three straight years with the same two nominees.
  • Jack Nicholson, Chinatown, 1974
    • The first actor to win more than two awards but then lose the Oscar (winning four awards).
  • Bob Hoskins, Mona Lisa, 1986
    • Wins 6 of 7 nominations, including Globe.  Fails to win the Oscar.  Sets new Consensus record for losing Oscar.
  • Al Pacino, Scent of a Woman, 1992
    • First actor nominated for lead and supporting in same year (other than Fitzgerald’s oddity); wins the former.
  • Bill Murray, Lost in Translation, 2003
    • Crushes Consensus record for most points without winning the Oscar.
  • Colin Firth, The King’s Speech, 2010
    • The second “revenge winner”, this time beating Jeff Bridges.

Kudos to the Oscars – the best post-1949 performances nominated by the Oscars but no one else

  1. Marlon Brando, A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951
  2. William Holden, Sunset Blvd., 1950
  3. William Holden, Stalag 17, 1953
  4. Humphrey Bogart, The Caine Mutiny, 1954
  5. Montgomery Clift, From Here to Eternity, 1953
  6. Kirk Douglas, The Bad and the Beautiful, 1952
  7. Alec Guinness, The Lavender Hill Mob, 1952
  8. Clint Eastwood, Million Dollar Baby, 2004
  9. Paul Newman, Absence of Malice, 1981
  10. Montgomery Clift, A Place in the Sun, 1951

The BAFTAs

Summary:

The BAFTAs didn’t give out acting awards for the first few years.  They began in 1952 with four awards, split by gender and split into British and Foreign.  With no supporting awards, many performances deemed supporting by other groups would be pushed into the regular category.  In the Foreign category, the BAFTA would not be so far away from the Oscar with five winners the same and most Oscar winners earning a BAFTA nom at least.  Marlon Brando would dominate by winning the first three awards.  In the British category, the BAFTA would mostly focus on distinguished British film actors who were completely ignored by the Oscars including Kenneth More and Jack Hawkins and giving three awards to Peter Finch years before he would win his posthumous Oscar.

In 1968, the BAFTAs would drop the distinction between the two categories and add Supporting Actor as a category and set the number of nominees at four where it would stay, with a couple of exceptions, until 2000.  In this category, they would be very much, for the first decade, about awarding an actor for multiple performances; of the first eight winners, six of them were for multiple performances.  That seemed to finally break in 1976 when two actors were nominated for multiple performances (Dustin Hoffman, Walter Matthau) but neither won the award.  After that, there were two oddities (1982, with five nominees, 1983 with two winners) but the rest of the years were just four nominees and one winner.

After 1982, they also became more consistent with the Oscars, though there would be issues because of different eligibility years and the occasional British actor would win the award without even an Oscar nomination (John Cleese in 1988, Hugh Grant in 1994, Robert Carlyle in 1997, Jamie Bell in 2000).  Since 2000, no BAFTA winner has failed to earn an Oscar nomination and most actors have won both awards.  Since 1992, Bill Murray and Mickey Rourke are the only Americans to win the BAFTA without winning the Oscar.

Genres:

Drama  (53.68% noms, 60.00% winners) and Comedy (18.80% noms, 21.18% winners) account for over 70% of the nominees and 80% of the winners.  Kids and Sci-Fi have never had a nominee and Action, Fantasy and Horror have never had a winner.  And the numbers above only account for the films – Drama actually has one more winner (Julius Caesar won British and Foreign awards) plus eight films that earned two nominations without winning and another six films with a winner and a nominee.

Best Picture:

A whopping 22 films have won Picture and Actor.  Before 1968, 12 films won both with eight of those also winning the British Film award.  After the drop to one Actor category in 1968, things stayed strong for a while (9 films in the first 20 years) but after that it dropped off with only three films winning both in the 90’s and none in the 00’s though the last two years have revived it with both The King’s Speech and The Artist winning both.  The King’s Speech is notable as the first film since the current British Film award was established in the early 90’s to win Picture, Actor and British Film.  While no film won both Picture and Actor in the 00’s, seven of the films that won Actor were Picture nominees and overall, 36 films have been nominated for Actor and won Picture.  There have been another 112 films nominated for both awards.

Multiple Nominations:

Because of the long stretch (1952-1967) of the British Actor and Foreign Actor categories there are a lots of films that earned multiple nominations (also because there was no supporting category at the time and many performances that might have been deemed supporting were nominated as lead).  Julius Caesar is notable for being the only film to win both awards.  Prior to 1968, there were 19 films nominated for multiple performances with eight of them winning an award but since 1968, only seven films have done it with only three winning an award (Network, The Killing Fields, A Fish Called Wanda) and only one film earning multiple nominations since 1988 (21 Grams).  It’s also notable that of those seven films, four of them (Killing Fields, Fish, 21 Grams, Hannah and Her Sisters) earned a nomination for a performance that earned an Oscar nomination (in three cases actually won the Oscar) in supporting.

Single Nominees:

Of the 367 films nominated for Actor (30 more than Actress), only 71 of them earned no other nominations (23 fewer than Actress).  Ten of those films won the award though since 1967 it’s only been three with two of those (Downhill Racer, Pete n Tillie) being part of an actor winning the award for multiple films.  The only completely single performance to win the Actor award is Kiss of the Spider Woman.  In addition, the idea has mostly gone away with no film earning that single nomination between 1985 and 1999, then four in a row from 1999 to 2002 then none since.

Foreign Films:

The Foreign Actor category that existed from 1952 to 1967 was mostly filled with American actors rather than performances in foreign language films.  There were, by my count, 23 films during that stretch and only three winners came from those films (Gervaise, Divorce Italian Style, Yesterday Today and Tomorrow) though Seven Samurai and Inspector Maigret both earned multiple noms.  Since the drop of the split category, there have been nine nominees with only one before 1987 and then usually every few years since.  Cinema Paradiso and Life is Beautiful won the award and Jean de Florette earned two noms.

Other Categories:

Picture is the category that most often lines up with Actor by a long, long way with 201 films nominated for both.  Because I list Screenplay as one category at the BAFTAs that is the only other category over 100 match-ups with 166 total while Actress lines up exactly 100 times.  Sixteen films have won both Actor and Actress, almost half of them during the years when there were multiple Actor and Actress categories and only three films managing it since 1983 (Silence of the Lambs, American Beauty, Lost in Translation).  Eight films have managed to win Picture, Actor and Actress, three of them before there was a Director category (Room at the Top, The Apartment, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf), two of them failing to win Director (Educating Rita, American Beauty), two of them winning Director but not Screenplay (Sunday Bloody Sunday, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest) and one winning the big five (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid).

The BAFTA Top 10:

  1. Peter Finch  –  420
  2. Jack Lemmon  –  350
  3. Marlon Brando  –  315
  4. Laurence Olivier  –  280
  5. Dustin Hoffman  –  280
  6. Michael Caine  –  280
  7. Daniel Day-Lewis  –  280
  8. Sidney Poitier  –  245
  9. Dirk Bogarde  –  245
  10. Spencer Tracy  /  Albert Finney  /  Anthony Hopkins  –  210

The BAFTA Top 5  (British Actor, 1952-1967):

  1. Peter Finch  –  280
  2. Laurence Olivier  –  245
  3. Dirk Bogarde  –  210
  4. Kenneth More  –  175
  5. Jack Hawkins  /  Trevor Howard  /  Alec Guinness  /  Richard Attenborough  /  Richard Burton  –  140

The BAFTA Top 5  (Foreign Actor, 1952-1967)

  1. Marlon Brando  –  245
  2. Jack Lemmon  –  245
  3. Sidney Poitier  –  245
  4. Spencer Tracy  –  140
  5. Paul Newman  /  Marcello Mastroianni  /  Rod Steiger  –  140

Top 5 BAFTA Winners:

  1. Peter O’Toole  (Lawrence of Arabia)
  2. Alec Guinness  (The Bridge on the River Kwai)
  3. Jack Nicholson  (Chinatown)
  4. Anthony Hopkins  (The Silence of the Lambs)
  5. Jack Nicholson  (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)

Top 3 BAFTA Years  (British Actor, 1952-1967)

  1. 1963  (Dirk Bogarde (The Servant), Albert Finney, Hugh Griffith (Tom Jones), Tom Courtenay (Billy Liar), Richard Harris (This Sporting Life))
  2. 1966  (Richard Burton (Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf / The Spy Who Came in from the Cold), Ralph Richardson (Doctor Zhivago / Khartoum / The Wrong Box), Michael Caine (Alfie), David Warner (Morgan))
  3. 1960  (Peter Finch (The Trials of Oscar Wilde), Alec Guinness, John Mills (Tunes of Glory), Richard Attenborough (The Angry Silence), Albert Finney (Saturday Night and Sunday Morning), Laurence Olivier (The Entertainer), John Fraser (The Trials of Oscar Wilde))

Top 3 BAFTA Years  (Foreign Actor, 1952-1967)

  1. 1967  (Rod Steiger (In the Heat of the Night), Sidney Poitier (In the Heat of the Night), Orson Welles (Chimes at Midnight), Warren Beatty (Bonnie and Clyde))
  2. 1955  (Ernest Borgnine (Marty), Toshiro Mifune, Takashi Shimura (Ikiru), James Dean (East of Eden), Jack Lemmon (Mr. Roberts), Frank Sinatra (Not as a Stranger))
  3. 1960  (Jack Lemmon (The Apartment), Burt Lancaster (Elmer Gantry), Fredric March, Spencer Tracy (Inherit the Wind), Yves Montand (Let’s Make Love), George Hamilton (Crime and Punishment U.S.A.))

Top 5 BAFTA Years  (4 Nominees, 1968-1998):

  1. 1993  (Anthony Hopkins (Shadowlands), Anthony Hopkins (The Remains of the Day), Daniel Day-Lewis (In the Name of the Father), Liam Neeson (Schindler’s List))
  2. 1980  (John Hurt (The Elephant Man), Peter Sellers (Being There), Roy Scheider (All That Jazz), Dustin Hoffman (Kramer vs. Kramer))
  3. 1989  (Daniel Day-Lewis (My Left Foot), Dustin Hoffman (Rain Man), Kenneth Branagh (Henry V), Robin Williams (Dead Poets Society))
  4. 1981  (Burt Lancaster (Atlantic City), Robert De Niro (Raging Bull), Bob Hoskins (The Long Good Friday), Jeremy Irons (The French Lieutenant’s Woman))
  5. 1985  (William Hurt (Kiss of the Spider Woman), F. Murray Abraham (Amadeus), Harrison Ford (Witness), Victor Banerjee (A Passage to India))

Top 3 BAFTA Years  (5 Nominees, 1999-2011):

  1. 2002  (Daniel Day-Lewis (Gangs of New York)Michael Caine (The Quiet American), Adrien Brody (The Pianist), Nicolas Cage (Adaptation), Jack Nicholson (About Schmidt))
  2. 2005  (Philip Seymour Hoffman (Capote)Heath Ledger (Brokeback Mountain), Ralph Fiennes (The Constant Gardener), David Strathairn (Good Night and Good Luck), Joaquin Phoenix (Walk the Line))
  3. 2011  (Jean Dujardin (The Artist), George Clooney (The Descendents), Gary Oldman (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy), Michael Fassbender (Shame), Brad Pitt (Moneyball))

Years in Which the Worst of the Nominees Won the BAFTA:

  • 1961 – Brit  –  Peter Finch (No Love for Johnnie) over Dirk Bogarde
  • 1963 – Brit  –  Dirk Bogarde (The Servant) over Albert Finney, Hugh Griffith, Tom Courtenay, Richard Harris
  • 1964 – For  –  Marcello Mastroianni (Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow) over Sterling Hayden, Sidney Poitier, Cary Grant
  • 1965 – Brit  –  Dirk Bogarde (Darling) over Rex Harrison, Michael Caine, Harry Andrews
  • 1967 – For  –  Rod Steiger (In the Heat of the Night) over Orson Welles, Warren Beatty, Sidney Poitier
  • 1968  –  Spencer Tracy (Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner) over Trevor Howard, Nicol Williamson, Ron Moody
  • 1990  –  Philippe Noiret (Cinema Paradiso) over Robert De Niro, Tom Cruise, Sean Connery
  • 1992  –  Robert Downey Jr (Chaplin) over Daniel Day-Lewis, Tim Robbins, Stephen Rea
  • 1998  –  Roberto Benigni (Life is Beautiful) over Tom Hanks, Michael Caine, Joseph Fiennes

Kudos to the BAFTAs – the best performances nominated by the BAFTAs but no one else:

  1. Takashi Shimura  (Ikiru)
  2. Orson Welles  (Chimes at Midnight)
  3. Alec Guinness  (Tunes of Glory)
  4. James Dean  (Rebel Without a Cause)
  5. Bob Hoskins  (The Long Good Friday)
  6. Ralph Fiennes  (The End of the Affair)
  7. Tony Curtis  (Sweet Smell of Success)
  8. Henry Fonda  (12 Angry Men)
  9. Daniel Day-Lewis  (The Last of the Mohicans)
  10. John Mills  (Tunes of Glory)

note:  Very different from the Actress list which was mostly foreign and had no Americans.  Here we have four Americans plus an Irish actor in a Hollywood production.  Dean kind of deserves an asterisk because the Oscars nominated him for East of Eden instead and the Globes didn’t have nominees that year, but rather just a winner.

The BAFTAs Being Different

  • David Niven, 1958, Separate Tables  –  Niven, a British actor, wins the Oscar, Globe and NYFC but doesn’t earn even a nom from the BAFTAs.
  • 1965  –  Because of eligibility differences and two BAFTA categories, four of the five Oscar nominees (Lee Marvin, Rod Steiger, Oskar Werner (though for a different film), Richard Burton) win the BAFTA while Laurence Olivier, playing Othello, doesn’t earn a nomination.
  • 1970  –  Dustin Hoffman wins the BAFTA in part for Midnight Cowboy while his co-star, Jon Voight, who won the NYFC and NSFC and earned Oscar and Globe noms isn’t even nominated.
  • George C. Scott, 1970, Patton  –  Wins five of the six awards, the first actor to win all three critics awards, loses BAFTA.
  • Jon Voight, 1978, Coming Home  –  Wins five awards including the Oscar; fails to even be nominated at the BAFTAs.
  • Dustin Hoffman, 1980, Kramer vs. Kramer  –  Wins five awards, pushed into next year in BAFTA eligibility and loses.
  • Robert De Niro, 1981, Raging Bull  –  Wins six awards, pushed into next year in BAFTA eligibility and loses.
  • Haing S. Ngor, 1984, The Killing Fields  –  After winning the Globe and Oscar as supporting, Ngor wins the BAFTA for lead.
  • Michael Caine, 1986, Hannah and Her Sisters  –  After winning the Oscar and earning a Globe nom for supporting, Caine is BAFTA nominated as a lead.
  • Kevin Kline, 1988, A Fish Called Wanda  –  After winning the Oscar for supporting, BAFTA nominated as lead.
  • Jeremy Irons, 1990, Reversal of Fortune  –  British actor, wins 6 awards including Oscar, doesn’t even earn BAFTA nom.
  • Nicolas Cage, 1995, Leaving Las Vegas  –  Kept from the first perfect 10 for 10 sweep by losing the BAFTA.
  • 1997  –  For the only time in history, none of the Oscar nominees receive a BAFTA nom.  Last time to date that BAFTA winner (Robert Carlyle) receives no other nominations.
  • Benicio del Toro, 2003, 21 Grams  –  Earns SAG, BFCA and Oscar noms for supporting, BAFTA nom for lead.
  • Denzel Washington, career  –  Has never earned a BAFTA nom



The Golden Globes

Summary:

The Golden Globes are known for their split into two – Drama and Comedy / Musical.  That wasn’t actually always the case, as all their awards until 1950 were just one category (Actor).  Even then, things weren’t how they were now.  From 1943 to 1948, there was just a winner (although all were from Dramas).  In 1949, there was a winner and a nominee.  Starting in 1950, they were split into Drama and Comedy, though in 1951 for Comedy and in both from 1953 to 1955, there were no nominees, only winners.  After that, with a few exceptions (most notably 1962 and 1963), there would be five nominees in each category.

Multiple Nominations (Films):

Seven films have won Actor and earned another nomination, four in Drama (In the Heat of the Night, The Godfather, The Dresser, Amadeus) and two in Comedy (The Fisher King, In Bruges).  Of those seven, three of the Drama winners went on to win the Oscar and all eight Drama actors earned Oscar nominations (though one was in supporting) while in Comedy, The Fisher King earned a nomination while In Bruges got nothing.  The Sunshine Boys actually won Best Actor twice in a tie and one winner earned an Oscar nom while the other won the Oscar in supporting.  Another 13 films have earned multiple nominations for Actor without a win for either, five in Drama and seven in Comedy.  Of the five in Drama, two earned both Oscar noms (The Defiant Ones, Midnight Cowboy), two earned a single nom (Sons and Lovers, Lawrence of Arabia) while the last earned only a single nom but actually won the Oscar (Kiss of the Spider Woman).  Of the 14 performances in Comedy, they combined for one Oscar nom: The Odd Couple.

Multiple Nominations (Actors):

Jack Lemmon was the first Actor to score two nominations in one year, earning two Comedy noms in 1963 (Under the Yum Yum Tree, Irma La Douce) in a field with eight nominees.  In 1966, Michael Caine became the first to snag noms in both categories with Alfie and Gambit while Dustin Hoffman did it in 1969 (Midnight Cowboy, John and Mary).  In 1992, Tim Robbins became the first Actor to beat himself winning Comedy (The Player) and earning a second nom (Bob Roberts) while Tom Hanks the next year won Drama (Philadelphia) while earning a Comedy nom (Sleepless in Seattle).  Billy Bob Thornton earned noms in both in 2001 (The Man Who Wasn’t There, Bandits) which was ironic given how good his performance was in Monster’s Ball.  Leo earned multiple Drama noms in 2006 (The Departed, Blood Diamond) and Johnny Depp did it in Comedy in 2010 (Alice in Wonderland, The Tourist), the latter presumably because the Globe voters lost their minds which they would do again the next year because Ryan Gosling deserved a Drama nom for Blue Valentine but not a Comedy one for Crazy Stupid Love.

Genres:

Ah, the joy of what you consider a specific genre.  There have been 286 films nominated in the Comedy / Musical category with 254 of them being classified by me as either a Comedy or a Musical and only, thankfully, one of them as a Drama (Diary of a Mad Housewife).  But in Drama, there are 311 films, 9 of which I consider Musicals and a whopping 22 that I have as Comedy.  While I am more open on the Musical categorization (it includes three winners – Amadeus, Shine, Crazy Heart), there are also five Comedies that win the Drama award (Cyrano de Bergerac, The Actress, Forrest Gump, The Truman Show, About Schmidt – even Jack said it was a Comedy after he won).  There is also Around the World in 80 Days which won Actor – Comedy but Picture – Drama.

Best Picture:

Like with Actress, the lead categories line up with Picture a lot more at the Globes, of course, because of the Drama / Comedy distinction for both.  But it’s especially true in Actor.  In Comedy, 23 films have won Picture and Actor and in Drama, the number is 25, including a five year streak from 1964 to 1968.  In all, 90 Best Picture winners at the Globes (out of 135) have at least earned an Actor nomination (43 Comedy, 47 Drama).  From 1956 (when nominees in all categories became the standard) to 1995, only one year had no Actor nominees among the Picture winners (1986), though it has become at least an occasional occurrence since then (1995, 2006, 2009).  Slightly more than half of all the nominated films in both Comedy and Drama also earned Picture nominations.  The most prevalent was Comedy in the 70’s – only 14 films earned an Actor nomination without a Picture nomination and oddly, one of them (All That Jazz) actually earned a Picture nom at the Oscars.  In three years, every Comedy Actor nominee came from a Picture nominee (1959, 1973, 1975) and it happened in Drama in 1960, 1972 and 1997 though I should point out that in most of those years at least one film with two nominees.

Foreign Films:

In the mid 60’s, there were four Foreign Comedy films with nominees including back-to-back winners in 1962 (Divorce Italian Style) and 1963 (Il Diavolo).  But, after 1967, there have only been three nominees and all of them were in Drama (A Special Day, Before Night Falls, Mar Adentro).

Single Nominations:

There have been 143 films nominated for Actor and nothing else (far fewer than the 203 for Actress).  Of those, 20 won the Globe (12 Drama, 8 Comedy).  But 11 of them were by 1959 and then only four more from 1987 to 2001 before becoming more frequent starting in 2005.  Since 1956 (when nominations became the standard) the only year where both Actor winners had no other nominations was 1987 (Wall Street, Good Morning Vietnam).  Wall Street and Last King of Scotland are the only films to do this at the Globes and the Oscars

Other Categories:

With 335 overlapping films, Picture is by far the biggest category to join with Actor.  Director (179) and Actress (154) are the next highest overlapping categories.  Only three films have managed to win Actor and Actress in Drama, all of them in a four year stretch (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Network, Coming Home – and all three won both Oscars as well) but a dozen films have done it in Comedy with only As Good as It Gets repeating it at the Oscars.  Foreign is by far the category with the least overlap (17, but a lot of those were the “English Language” Foreign category).

The Golden Globes Top 10  (Drama):

  1. Al Pacino  –  420
  2. Jack Nicholson  –  385
  3. Leonardo DiCaprio  –  280
  4. Tom Hanks  –  245
  5. Gregory Peck  –  245
  6. Jon Voight  –  245
  7. Dustin Hoffman  –  245
  8. Paul Newman  –  245
  9. Peter O’Toole  –  245
  10. eight actors  –  210

The Golden Globes Top 10  (Comedy / Musical):

  1. Jack Lemmon  –  455
  2. Johnny Depp  –  350
  3. Walter Matthau  –  315
  4. Robin Williams  –  280
  5. Dustin Hoffman  –  245
  6. Michael Caine  –  210
  7. Jack Nicholson  –  210
  8. Jim Carrey  –  210
  9. Danny Kaye  –  175
  10. Cary Grant  /  Peter Sellers  /  Dudley Moore  /  Steve Martin  /  John Travolta  –  175

The Golden Globes Top 10

  1. Jack Lemmon  –  665
  2. Jack Nicholson  –  595
  3. Dustin Hoffman  –  490
  4. Al Pacino  –  455
  5. Peter O’Toole  –  385
  6. Tom Hanks  –  385
  7. Johnny Depp  –  385
  8. Robin Williams  –  350
  9. Walter Matthau  /  Robert De Niro  /  Michael Caine  –  350

Top 5 Globe Drama Winners:

  1. Alec Guinness  (The Bridge on the River Kwai)
  2. Jack Nicholson  (Chinatown)
  3. Robert De Niro  (Raging Bull)
  4. Peter O’Toole  (The Lion in Winter)
  5. Jack Nicholson  (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)

Top 5 Globe Comedy Winners:

  1. Jack Lemmon  (The Apartment)
  2. Peter Sellers  (Being There)
  3. Bill Murray  (Lost in Translation)
  4. Dustin Hoffman  (Tootsie)
  5. Jack Lemmon  (Some Like It Hot)

Worst 5 Globe Drama Winners:

  1. Anthony Franciosa  (Career)
  2. Jon Voight  (Runaway Train)
  3. Al Pacino  (Scent of a Woman)
  4. Alexander Knox  (Wilson)
  5. Gregory Peck  (The Yearling)

Worst 5 Globe Comedy Winners:

  1. Tom Ewell  (The Seven Year Itch)
  2. Richard Harris  (Camelot)
  3. Danny Kaye  (On the Riviera)
  4. Ray Sharkey  (The Idolmaker)
  5. Robin Williams  (Mrs. Doubtfire)

Worst 5 Globe Drama Nominees:

  1. Jon Voight  (The Champ)
  2. Brad Pitt  (Legends of the Fall)
  3. Tom Tryon  (The Cardinal)
  4. Gregory Peck  (MacArthur)
  5. Al Pacino  (Scarface)

Worst 5 Globe Comedy Nominees:

  1. Johnny Depp  (The Tourist)
  2. Rex Harrison  (Doctor Dolittle)
  3. Tom Ewell  (The Seven Year Itch)
  4. Richard Harris  (Camelot)
  5. Edward Albert  (Butterflies are Free)

10 Best English Language Post-1955 Drama Performances Not Nominated for the Globe:

  1. Orson Welles  (Touch of Evil)
  2. Marlon Brando  (Last Tango in Paris)
  3. Clint Eastwood  (Unforgiven)
  4. Tom Wilkinson  (In the Bedroom)
  5. Orson Welles  (Chimes at Midnight)
  6. Kenneth Branagh  (Henry V)
  7. Kirk Douglas  (Paths of Glory)
  8. Kenneth Branagh  (Hamlet)
  9. Jeremy Renner  (The Hurt Locker)
  10. William Holden  (The Wild Bunch)

10 Best English Language Post-1955 Comedy Performances Not Nominated for the Globe

  1. Peter Sellers  (Dr. Strangelove)
  2. George C. Scott  (Dr. Strangelove)
  3. Harrison Ford  (Raiders of the Lost Ark)
  4. George Clooney  (Out of Sight)
  5. Ewan McGregor  (Trainspotting)
  6. Jeff Bridges  (The Big Lebowski)
  7. Kenneth Branagh  (Much Ado About Nothing)
  8. Kevin Costner  (Bull Durham)
  9. John Cusack  (Say Anything)
  10. George Clooney  (Three Kings)

note:  Certainly some of these wouldn’t have been considered Comedies by the Globes but how did they miss both Strangelove performances?  Also, in 1998 the Globes nominated Robin Williams for Patch Adams rather than Clooney or Bridges.

5 Most Acclaimed Performances to not Win the Globe (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. Burt Lancaster, Atlantic City, 1981
  2. Daniel Day-Lewis, My Left Foot, 1989
  3. Sean Penn, Milk, 2008
  4. Robert De Niro, Taxi Driver, 1976
  5. Anthony Hopkins, The Silence of the Lambs, 1991

5 Least Acclaimed Performances to Win the Drama Globe (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. Jim Carrey, The Truman Show, 1998
  2. Omar Sharif, Doctor Zhivago, 1965
  3. Anthony Franciosa, Career, 1959
  4. Jon Voight, Runaway Train, 1985
  5. Denzel Washington, The Hurricane, 1999

5 Most Acclaimed Performances to not earn a Globe nomination (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. Laurence Olivier, Henry V, 1946
  2. Bing Crosby, Going My Way, 1944
  3. Ralph Richardson, The Sound Barrier, 1952
  4. Marlon Brando, Last Tango in Paris, 1973
  5. Jeremy Renner, The Hurt Locker, 2009

note:  I won’t do a least acclaimed for this because it’s just going to be five very recent performances that earned no other nominations, since there are so many points available nowadays..

Top 5 Globe Years  (Drama):

  1. 1972  (Marlon Brando (The Godfather)Al Pacino (The Godfather), Laurence Olivier, Michael Caine (Sleuth), Jon Voight (Deliverance))
  2. 2002  (Jack Nicholson (About Schmidt)Daniel Day-Lewis (Gangs of New York), Michael Caine (The Quiet American), Adrien Brody (The Pianist), Leonardo DiCaprio (Catch Me If You Can))
  3. 1984  (F. Murray Abraham (Amadeus), Tom Hulce (Amadeus), Sam Waterston (The Killing Fields), Albert Finney (Under the Volcano), Jeff Bridges (Starman))
  4. 2007  (Daniel Day-Lewis (There Will Be Blood)George Clooney (Michael Clayton), James McAvoy (Atonement), Viggo Mortensen (Eastern Promises), Denzel Washington (Eastern Promises))
  5. 1995  (Nicolas Cage (Leaving Las Vegas)Ian McKellen (Richard III), Anthony Hopkins (Nixon), Sean Penn (Dead Man Walking), Richard Dreyfuss (Mr. Holland’s Opus))

Top 5 Globe Years  (Comedy):

  1. 2004  (Jamie Foxx (Ray), Jim Carrey (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind), Paul Giamatti (Sideways), Kevin Spacey (Beyond the Sea), Kevin Kline (De-Lovely))
  2. 2002  (Richard Gere (Chicago), Nicolas Cage (Adaptation), Hugh Grant (About a Boy), Adam Sandler (Punch Drunk Love), Kieran Culkin (Igby Goes Down))
  3. 1989  (Morgan Freeman (Driving Miss Daisy), Jack Nicholson (Batman), Steve Martin (Parenthood), Billy Crystal (When Harry Met Sally), Michael Douglas (The War of the Roses))
  4. 2007  (Johnny Depp (Sweeney Todd), Tom Hanks (Charlie Wilson’s War), Ryan Gosling (Lars and the Real Girl), Philip Seymour Hoffman (The Savages), John C. Reilly (Walk Hard))
  5. 1988  (Tom Hanks (Big), Bob Hoskins (Who Framed Roger Rabbit), John Cleese (A Fish Called Wanda), Robert De Niro (Midnight Run), Michael Caine (Dirty Rotten Scoundrels))

note:  The Top 5 Drama years are much better than the Top 5 Comedy years.  The #1 Comedy year is way below even the #5 Drama year.

Worst 5 Globe Years  (Drama):

  1. 1977  (Richard Burton (Equus), Marcello Mastroianni (A Special Day), Al Pacino (Bobby Deerfield), Henry Wrinkler (Heroes), Gregory Peck (MacArthur))
  2. 1952  (Gary Cooper (High Noon), Ray Milland (The Thief), Charles Boyer (The Happy Time))
  3. 1959  (Anthony Franciosa (Career), Richard Burton (Look Back in Anger), Joseph Schildkraut (The Diary of Anne Frank), Charlton Heston (Ben Hur), Fredric March (Middle of the Night))
  4. 1964  (Peter O’Toole (Becket), Richard Burton (Becket), Fredric March (Seven Days in May), Anthony Quinn (Zorba the Greek), Anthony Franciosa (Rio Conchos))
  5. 1956  (Kirk Douglas (Lust for Life), Karl Malden (Baby Doll), Gary Cooper (Friendly Persuasion), Burt Lancaster (The Rainmaker), Charlton Heston (The 10 Commandments))

Worst 5 Globe Years  (Comedy):

  1. 1961  (Glenn Ford (Pocketful of Miracles), Richard Beymer (West Side Story), Fred Astaire (The Pleasure of His Company), Bob Hope (Bachelor in Paradise), Fred MacMurray (The Absent-Minded Professor))
  2. 1957  (Frank Sinatra (Pal Joey), Maurice Chevalier (Love in the Afternoon), Glenn Ford (Don’t Go Near the Water), David Niven (My Man Godfrey), Tony Randall (Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter))
  3. 1990  (Gerard Depardieu (Green Card), Johnny Depp (Edward Scissorhands), Patrick Swayze (Ghost), Richard Gere (Pretty Woman), Macauley Culkin (Home Alone))
  4. 1976  (Kris Kristofferson (A Star is Born), Gene Wilder (Silver Streak), Mel Brooks (Silent Movie), Peter Sellers (The Pink Panther Strikes Again), Jack Weston (The Ritz))
  5. 1980  (Ray Sharkey (The Idolmaker), Paul Le Mat (Melvin and Howard), Walter Matthau (Hopscotch), Tommy Lee Jones (The Coal Miner’s Daughter), Neil Diamond (The Jazz Singer))

Top 5 Films to win the Globe – Drama (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. The Godfather
  2. Chinatown
  3. The Bridge on the River Kwai
  4. On the Waterfront
  5. Raging Bull

Top 5 Films to win the Globe – Comedy  (based on quality of film not the performance)

  1. Some Like It Hot
  2. The Apartment
  3. Lost in Translation
  4. The Fisher King
  5. Four Weddings and a Funeral

Worst 5 Films to win the Globe – Drama  (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. Scent of a Woman
  2. True Grit
  3. Wilson
  4. Runaway Train
  5. Career

Worst 5 Films to win the Globe – Comedy  (based on quality of film not the performance)

  1. Camelot
  2. Cat Ballou
  3. Borat
  4. Mrs. Doubtfire
  5. Scrooge

Worst 5 Films to earn a Globe nomination (either) (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. The Tourist
  2. Patch Adams
  3. Cleopatra
  4. Doctor Dolittle
  5. Love Story

Years in Which the Worst of the Nominees Won the Globe:

  • 1959 – Drama  –  Anthony Franciosa (Career) wins over Richard Burton, Charlton Heston, Fredric March, Joseph Schildkraut
  • 1992 – Drama  –  Al Pacino (Scent of a Woman) wins over Denzel Washington, Tom Cruise, Jack Nicholson, Robert Downey Jr
  • 1993 – Comedy  –  Robin Williams (Mrs. Doubtfire) wins over Johnny Depp, Tom Hanks, Colm Meaney, Kevin Kline

Kudos to the Globes – the best performances nominated by the Globes – Drama but no one else

  1. Kirk Douglas, Detective Story, 1951
  2. Forest Whitaker, Bird, 1988
  3. Leonardo DiCaprio, Revolutionary Road, 2008
  4. Al Pacino, The Godfather Part III, 1990
  5. Liam Neeson, Michael Collins, 1996

Kudos to the Globes – the best performances nominated by the Globes – Comedy but no one else

  1. Robert Preston, The Music Man, 1962
  2. Johnny Depp, Ed Wood, 1994
  3. John Cusack, High Fidelity, 2000
  4. Bob Hoskins, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, 1988
  5. George Clooney, O Brother Where Art Thou, 2000

We Agree on the Film but Not the Performance – films that earned Oscar and Globe noms for different performers

note:  Only listed if they nominated different performers in the same category.

  • 1978:  Laurence Olivier nominated for the Oscar, Gregory Peck nominated for the Globe  (The Boys from Brazil)
  • 1990:  Robert De Niro nominated for the Oscar, Robin Williams nominated for the Globe  (Awakenings)

Globe Lists:

  • Best Combination Winner (Drama / Comedy):  1960  (Burt Lancaster (Elmer Gantry) and Jack Lemmon (The Apartment))
  • Most Lopsided Winner (Drama over Comedy):  1980  (Robert De Niro (Raging Bull) over Ray Sharkey (The Idolmaker))
  • Most Lopsided Winner (Comedy over Drama):  1959  (Jack Lemmon (Some Like It Hot) over Anthony Franciosa (Career))
  • Worst Combination Winner (Drama / Comedy):  1969  (John Wayne (True Grit) and Peter O’Toole (Goodbye Mr. Chips))

Globe Oddities:

  • 1956:  Yul Brynner wins the Oscar but loses the Globe – Comedy / Musical to Cantinflas who was from a film (Around the World in 80 Days) that won Picture – Drama
  • 1959:  With the chance to give all in on Ben-Hur they give the Drama award to Anthony Franciosa for Career, one of only four Globe – Drama winners not to earn an Oscar nom
  • 1964:  Peter Sellers is nominated but for The Pink Panther instead of Dr. Strangelove
  • 1965:  Rather than reward Rod Steiger for The Pawnbroker, the Globe goes to Omar Sharif, another of the four Globe – Drama winners not to earn an Oscar nom
  • 1985:  The globe goes to Jon Voight instead of William Hurt, the only award Hurt is nominated for but doesn’t win
  • 1999:  The Globes bypass the Kevin Spacey – Russell Crowe race by awarding Denzel Washington

The Broadcast Film Critics Awards  (Critics Choice)

Summary:

The Actor award was one of the initial BFCA Awards that began in 1995.  Of the early winners, only Ian McKellen won for two performances (Gods and Monsters / Apt Pupil).  Russell Crowe was the big guy, winning three straight awards (99-01) while only Day-Lewis and Penn have managed two wins aside from him.  Starting in 2003, the BFCA has generally aligned with the Oscar, though they still don’t always agree.

  • Lowest Critical Acclaim for a BFCA Winner:  Kevin Bacon, Murder in the First, 1995
  • Highest Critical Acclaim for a BFCA nominee:  Bill Murray, Lost in Translation, 2003
  • Lowest Critical Acclaim for a BFCA nominee:  Viggo Mortensen, The Road, 2009
  • Highest Critical Acclaim for a BFCA snub:  Adrien Brody, The Pianist, 2002
  • Best Performance by a BFCA snub:  Adrien Brody, The Pianist, 2002
  • Best BFCA Nominee Not Nominated by Any Other Group:  Viggo Mortensen, The Road, 2009
  • Worst BFCA Winner:  Kevin Bacon, Murder in the First, 1995
  • Worst BFCA Nominee:  Sean Penn, I Am Sam, 2001

Top 5 BFCA Points:

  1. Russell Crowe  –  280
  2. Sean Penn  –  175
  3. Daniel Day-Lewis  –  140
  4. Leonardo DiCaprio  –  140
  5. Ryan Gosling  /  George Clooney  –  140

The Screen Actors Guild

Summary:

The SAG Awards began in 1994, rather late in the game for guild awards.  From the start, they agreed with the Oscar winner (every year except the streak of 01-03) and have agreed with most Oscar nominees (at least 4 nominees in all but three years, all 5 nominees in five years).  They did give the award to Benicio del Toro in 2000 when he would win the Oscar in supporting.  There has been no dominant actor with Daniel Day-Lewis the only one with multiple wins and no actor with more than four nominations (compare to Streep’s eight in Actress).

  • Lowest Critical Acclaim for a SAG Winner:  Johnny Depp, The Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, 2003
  • Highest Critical Acclaim for a SAG nominee:  Bill Murray, Lost in Translation, 2003
  • Lowest Critical Acclaim for a SAG nominee:  Philip Seymour Hoffman, Flawless, 1999
  • Highest Critical Acclaim for a SAG snub:  Gene Hackman, The Royal Tenenbaums, 2001
  • Best Performance by a SAG snub:  Johnny Depp, Ed Wood, 1994
  • Best SAG Nominee Not Nominated by Any Other Group:  Tim Robbins, The Shawshank Redemption, 1994
  • Worst SAG Winner:  Roberto Benigni, Life is Beautiful, 1998
  • Worst SAG Nominee:  Brad Pitt, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, 2008

The SAG Top 5:

  1. Russell Crowe  –  175
  2. Sean Penn  –  175
  3. Tom Hanks  –  140
  4. Daniel Day-Lewis  –  140
  5. 9 actors  –  105


The Critics Awards

Summary:

The New York Film Critics would begin handing out Best Actor in 1935, the first year of their awards.  The first six NYFC winners would all be Oscar nominees though none won the Oscar followed by five straight winners who won the Oscar.  It would take until 1952 for a non-Oscar nominee to win the award and 1977 for it to happen again.  Warner Bros would do well early on, winning half of the first 10 awards.  The National Board of Review gave their first award, in 1945, to Ray Milland who also won the NYFC, Oscar and Globe.  After back-to-back agreement in 1945-46, the NYFC and NBR wouldn’t agree again in back-to-back years until 1970 and 1971 and never again since.  The National Society of Film Critics would begin in 1966 and unlike with Actress, would mostly stick to English speaking actors with just three foreign winners.  The NSFC would agree with the NYFC in its second year (Rod Steiger) but there wouldn’t be agreement among all three groups until 1970 with George C. Scott.  The LA Film Critics would begin in 1975 and the next year, Robert De Niro would win the NYFC, LAFC and NSFC.  However, it would take until 1995, after the Boston and Chicago critics had begun as well before someone would even win the first four awards in the same year and that year Nicolas Cage would win all six, something that would happen again in 2006 with Forest Whitaker.

Multiple Wins:

Cage and Whitaker are the only winners of all six awards.  Prior to that, five actors won both awards when there were only two and George C. Scott won all three in 1970 when there were still only three.  Bill Murray (2003) and Philip Seymour Hoffman (2005) each won five of the six awards.

Multiple Films:

In the very first year, the NYFC gave their award to Charles Laughton for two films (Mutiny on the Bounty / Ruggles of Red Gap).  Since then, the NFYC has done it six times (twice for Jack Nicholson), the NBR has done 12 times (including for James Mason in 1953 for four films) while also splitting the award between two actors from the same film twice (Kiss of the Spider Woman, Awakenings), the NSFC has done it five times, the LAFC seven times (including for Michael Fassbender in 2011 for four films) and the BSFC once.

Foreign Films:

While the Actress award has thrived on foreign performances (23 of them winning 36 awards), it’s pretty rare for Actor.  Victor Sjostrom won the NYFC in 1959, Per Oskarson won the NSFC in 1968, Gerard Depardieu won the NSFC in 1983 for two films and Javier Bardem won both the NSFC and NBR in 2000.  That’s it.

Single Awards:

Through 2011, 212 films had won a critics award for Best Actor.  Of those, 106 only won an award for Best Actor, though 26 of them won multiple awards.  Of those films, 22 won two awards.  The last four films are Kiss of the Spider Woman (three awards, with two of them from the NBR for different performances), Awakenings (even more complicated – three awards, two of them from the NBR for different performances and the last shared with another performance by the same actor from a different film), The Apostle (three awards) and Last King of Scotland, which swept all six awards but didn’t win anything else.

Other Awards:

Doing the math above, you’ll realize that 106 films won Best Actress as well as at least one other award in another category.  Picture is the award that comes up the most with 65 films winning at least one award each for Picture and Actor followed by Director (47 films).  Fourteen films have won multiple awards in both Picture and Actor with Leaving Las Vegas (six Actor wins, two Picture wins), The Social Network (three Actor, six Picture) and The Hurt Locker (three Actor, five Picture) the biggest.  Only two films have ever won multiple awards for both Actor and Actress (Silence of the Lambs, Leaving Las Vegas).  Actor has been paired with every critics award, even Animated Film (thanks to George Clooney winning part of his Best Actor from the NYFC for Fantastic Mr. Fox).  The three films that get the fewest of their critics points from acting (less than 5% in each case – far less than the Actress equivalents) are GoodFellas, Schindler’s List and Pulp Fiction which won only one Actor award and were massive critics favorites.  Of the eight biggest films at the critics awards all-time, seven of them won at least one Actor award (all but L.A. Confidential) while none of them won an Actress award.

The Critics Top 10 (raw total):

  1. Daniel Day-Lewis  –  910
  2. Jack Nicholson  –  840
  3. Robert De Niro  –  630
  4. Burt Lancaster  –  420
  5. Jeremy Irons  –  420
  6. Nicolas Cage  –  420
  7. Forest Whitaker  –  420
  8. Gene Hackman  –  420
  9. nine tied  –  350

Best by Group

  • NYFC:  Alec Guinness  (The Bridge on the River Kwai, 1957)
  • LAFC:  Robert De Niro  (Raging Bull, 1980)
  • NSFC:  Jack Nicholson  (Chinatown, 1974)
  • BSFC:  Nicolas Cage  (Leaving Las Vegas, 1995)
  • CFC:  Nicolas Cage  (Leaving Las Vegas, 1995)
  • NBR:  Alec Guinness  (The Bridge on the River Kwai, 1957)

Worst by Group

  • NYFC:  John Geilgud  (Providence, 1977)
  • LAFC:  Denzel Washington  (Training Day, 2001)
  • NSFC:  Eddie Murphy  (The Nutty Professor, 1996)
  • BSFC:  Denzel Washington  (Training Day, 2001)
  • CFC:  Billy Bob Thornton  (Sling Blade, 1996)
  • NBR:  Richard Basehart  (14 Hours, 1951)

10 Best Performances that Didn’t Win any Critics Awards (post-1966):

  1. Dustin Hoffman, Rain Man, 1988
  2. Peter O’Toole, The Lion in Winter, 1968
  3. Ralph Fiennes, The English Patient, 1996
  4. Richard Burton, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, 1966
  5. Tom Hulce, Amadeus, 1984
  6. Warren Beatty, Bonnie and Clyde, 1967
  7. Warren Beatty, Reds, 1981
  8. John Hurt, The Elephant Man, 1980
  9. Leonardo DiCaprio, The Aviator, 2004
  10. Robert De Niro, The Deer Hunter, 1978

5 Most Acclaimed Post-1966 Performances to not Win a Critics Award (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. Peter Finch, Network, 1976
  2. Dustin Hoffman, Midnight Cowboy / John and Mary, 1969
  3. Jean Dujardin, The Artist, 2011
  4. Michael Caine, Educating Rita / The Honorary Consul, 1983
  5. Dustin Hoffman, Rain Man, 1988

Least Acclaimed Performances to Win the Critics by Group

  • NYFC:  Jennifer Jason Leigh, Georgia, 1995
  • LAFC:  Liam Neeson, Kinsey, 2004
  • NSFC:  River Phoenix, My Own Private Idaho, 1991
  • BSFC:  Colin Farrell, Tigerland, 2000
  • CFC:  Michael Shannon, Take Shelter, 2011
  • NBR:  Campbell Scott, Roger Dodger, 2002

note:  Basically, because of the larger total amount of Consensus points the more recent you get, these are all the most recent examples of a winner with no other Consensus points.

Most Critically Acclaimed Performance Snubbed by a Critics Group:

  • NYFC:  Philip Seymour Hoffman, Capote, 2005
  • LAFC:  Jack Nicholson, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, 1975
  • NSFC:  Robert De Niro, Raging Bull, 1980
  • BSFC:  Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood, 2007
  • CFC:  Daniel Day-Lewis, My Left Foot, 1989
  • NBR:  Burt Lancaster, Atlantic City, 1981

Critical Oddities:

note:  These are the performances that won multiple Critics Awards but failed to earn nominations from any of the awards groups.

  • Jeremy Irons  (Dead Ringers, 1988)
    • NYFC, CFC
  • David Thewliss  (Naked, 1993)
    • NYFC, NSFC

Going First Has Disadvantages – The NBR Being Different:

  • 1954  –  they award Bing Crosby while everyone else agrees on Marlon Brando
  • 1962  –  they award Jason Robards for two performances, one of which is not very good (Tender is the Night) and one of which is really supporting (Long Day’s Journey Into Night)
  • 1969/1972  –  after not rewarding Peter O’Toole for either Lawrence or Lion in Winter, they give him the award for both Goodbye Mr. Chips and Ruling Class
  • 1986  –  they award Paul Newman instead of 4 critic winner Bob Hoskins showing they are as sentimental as the Oscars
  • 1991  –  they declare Anthony Hopkins supporting in Silence of the Lambs (to be fair, so do the BSFC)
  • 2007  –  they award George Clooney instead of the dominant Daniel Day-Lewis
  • 2008  –  they award Clint Eastwood, the only award that doesn’t go to Sean Penn or Mickey Rourke (except for Globe – Comedy)
  • they have never awarded Daniel Day-Lewis


The Nighthawk Awards

note:  Because my awards go, retroactively, all the way back through 1912, there are a lot more nominees and winners than in the other awards.

Multiple Nominations (Films):

It would only take until 1935 for a film to win Actor and earn a second nomination (Mutiny on the Bounty) and it has happened four other times (Dr. Strangelove, Sleuth, Amadeus, GoodFellas).  Notably, the only film of those to do that at the Oscars chose the other actor as the winner.  Seven films have earned multiple nominations without a winner, three of which did it at the Oscars (From Here to Eternity, Midnight Cowboy, The Dresser), one of which had one of the actors win the Oscar (Network), one of which only had one of the actors nominated (In the Heat of the Night) and two of which had neither actor nominated (Tunes of Glory, Return of the King).

Multiple Nominations (Performances):

In my very first year (the combined year of 1912-26), Lon Chaney wins the award (Hunchback) and earns two nominations (Phantom, The Penalty) while Emil Jannings is nominated twice (Faust, The Last Laugh).  In 1941, Bogie earns two noms (Maltese Falcon, High Sierra) followed by Kirk Douglas in 1951 (Ace in the Hole, Detective Story).  James Dean wins (Rebel) and earns a nom (East of Eden) in 1955 while Daniel Day-Lewis is the only other to do that (1993 – In the Name of the Father, Age of Innocence).  Anthony Hopkins in 1993 (Shadowlands, Remains of the Day) and Billy Bob Thornton in 2001 (Man Who Wasn’t There, Monster’s Ball) are the others who manage two nominations.

Directors:

Seven directors have directed at least seven actresses to a Nighthawk nomination.  Howard Hawks is 0 for 7, Kurosawa is 1 for 7 and Lumet is 2 for 7 while Chaplin is 2 for 7 all for his own performances.  At the top of the list are John Huston (1 winner among 8 noms), Billy Wilder (3 winners among 9 noms) and the astounding results from Marty (9 films, 10 nominations, 5 winners for 4 different actors (De Niro twice, Liotta, Day-Lewis, Leo).

Sequels:

Al Pacino is the first to earn a nom for a sequel (for which he won the Nighthawk in supporting for the original) and then he would earn another nom for the third film.  Then come the two nominations for Return of the King (Elijah Wood, Viggo).  Christian Bale also scores a nomination for Dark Knight.

Genres:

Drama does dominated the wins (57.65%) and nominations (51.42%) but not nearly to the extent that it does in other categories with Comedy way behind in both wins (11.76%) and noms (16.11%).  War is just above 7% of the wins and Crime is just below 7% of the noms but no other genre is above 5% in either.  Kids (0) and Sci-Fi (2) are the only genres with less than 6 noms and they join Fantasy as the only genres without a win.

Best Picture:

While only a dozen films have won both Picture and Actress, there have been a whopping 33 to take both Picture and Actor though only two each in the 70’s and 80’s and only The Aviator since 1999 with no streak longer than three years (62-64).  Another 24 films win Picture and earn an Actor nomination.  The longest streak of Picture wins with at least an Actor nom is nine (30-38) while there are only two three year streaks without (75-77, 07-09).  In total, of the 422 films nominated for Actor, over half of them (226) earned a Picture nom as well, a good 100 more than for Actress.

Foreign Film:

There have been seven foreign language performances to win the Nighthawk, the same as Actress but with far greater language diversity.  In order, they are French (Albert Dieudonne, Napoleon), German (Peter Lorre, M), Russian (Nikolai Cherkasov, Ivan the Terrible Part I), Japanese (Takashi Shimura, Ikiru), Swedish (Gunnar Bjornstrand, Winter Light) and then German again (Klaus Kinsi, Aguirre the Wrath of God).  In addition there are 28 other performances that earn nominations which are mostly from Kurosawa films (6), Bergman films (4) or French films (8).

Single Nominations:

Only one film wins the award with no other nominations (Last King of Scotland, which did the same at the Oscars, guilds and Globes).  Aside from that, there are just 26 other films that earn the single nom for Actor with four of them being films that actually won the Oscar but not the Nighthawk (Wall Street, Reversal of Fortune, Ray, Capote).

Other Categories:

Director actually crosses over in one more film (227) than Picture (226) while Adapted Screenplay is also over 200.  Every major category crosses over at least 100 times with only Visual Effects, Makeup, Song, Foreign Film and Animated Film (no crossover) less than 100 and even most of those are more than 50.

My Top 10

  1. Humphrey Bogart  –  385
  2. Jack Nicholson  –  385
  3. Daniel Day-Lewis  –  385
  4. Laurence Olivier  –  350
  5. Paul Nemwan  –  350
  6. James Stewart  –  315
  7. Charlie Chaplin  –  315
  8. Orson Welles  –  280
  9. Robert De Niro  –  280
  10. Dustin Hoffman  –  280

My Top 10 Drama

  1. Daniel Day-Lewis  –  455
  2. Humphrey Bogart  –  385
  3. Laurence Olivier  –  350
  4. Paul Newman  –  350
  5. James Stewart  –  315
  6. Orson Welles  –  315
  7. Jack Nicholson  –  315
  8. Robert De Niro  –  315
  9. Fredric March  –  280
  10. Marlon Brando  /  Anthony Hopkins  /  Ralph Fiennes  –  280

My Top 10 Comedy

  1. Charlie Chaplin  –  560
  2. Cary Grant  –  420
  3. James Cagney  –  385
  4. Woody Allen  –  315
  5. Johnny Depp  –  315
  6. Alec Guinness  –  280
  7. George Clooney  –  280
  8. Fred Astaire  –  245
  9. Jack Lemmon  –  245
  10. Bill Murray  –  245

My Top 10 Weighted Points

  1. Jack Nicholson  –  615
  2. Paul Newman  –  575
  3. Laurence Olivier  –  533
  4. James Stewart  –  526
  5. Fredric March  –  517
  6. Humphrey Bogart  –  492
  7. Daniel Day-Lewis  –  483
  8. Henry Fonda  –  477
  9. Dustin Hoffman  –  462
  10. James Cagney  –  432

note:  This based on a scale from 20-1 based on Top 20 placement at the Nighthawks.  A win is worth 70 points in Actor, a 20th place finish is worth 1 point (if the list goes a full 20).

My Top 10 Absolute Points List:

  1. Jack Nicholson  –  958
  2. Paul Newman  –  863
  3. James Stewart  –  706
  4. Laurence Olivier  –  699
  5. Daniel Day-Lewis  –  687
  6. Dustin Hoffman  –  681
  7. Henry Fonda  –  664
  8. Robert De Niro  –  661
  9. Al Pacino  –  610
  10. Jack Lemmon  –  609

note:  This is a point scale based on their performance points, not where they finished in the year.

Top Absolute Points by Decade:

1912-1929

  1. Lon Chaney  –  277
  2. Emil Jannings  –  227
  3. Charlie Chaplin  –  157
  4. Erich von Stroheim  –  95
  5. Buster Keaton  –  60

1930-1939

  1. Fredric March  –  356
  2. Leslie Howard  –  349
  3. James Cagney  –  243
  4. Paul Muni  –  218
  5. Clark Gable  –  183

1940-1949

  1. Humphrey Bogart  –  383
  2. Cary Grant  –  296
  3. James Stewart  –  278
  4. Laurence Olivier  –  262
  5. Henry Fonda  –  235

1950-1959

  1. Alec Guinness  –  400
  2. Kirk Douglas  –  358
  3. James Stewart  –  315
  4. Marlon Brando  –  304
  5. William Holden  –  262

1960-1969

  1. Toshiro Mifune  –  470
  2. Richard Burton  –  339
  3. Paul Newman  –  331
  4. Burt Lancaster  –  278
  5. Sidney Poitier  –  278

1970-1979

  1. Jack Nicholson  –  357
  2. Al Pacino  –  313
  3. Dustin Hoffman  –  288
  4. Gene Hackman  –  253
  5. Robert Redford  /  Woody Allen  –  235

1980-1989

  1. William Hurt  –  279
  2. Jack Nicholson  –  278
  3. Paul Newman  –  261
  4. Jeremy Irons  –  261
  5. Harrison Ford  –  217

1990-1999

  1. Ralph Fiennes  –  349
  2. Daniel Day-Lewis  –  331
  3. Clint Eastwood  –  330
  4. Johnny Depp  –  322
  5. Robert De Niro  /  Denzel Washington  –  314

2000-2011

  1. Leonardo DiCaprio  –  453
  2. George Clooney  –  436
  3. Sean Penn  –  305
  4. Russell Crowe  –  287
  5. Christian Bale  –  271

Years in Which an Actor Exceeded 115 Absolute Points:

note:  I don’t include the all-encompassing pre-Oscar year of 1926 with all of Lon Chaney’s performances that get lumped together (but which are mostly from different years) but I do include the Toshiro Mifune films that get lumped together because of when they arrived in America.

  • James Stewart  –  1940  –  131  (The Philadelphia Story  /  The Shop Around the Corner  /  Destry Rides Again)
  • Humphrey Bogart  –  1941  –  122  (The Maltese Falcon  /  High Sierra)
  • Richard Widmark  –  1950  –  131  (Night and the City  /  No Way Out  /  Panic in the Streets)
  • James Stewart  –  1950  –  123  (Harvey  /  Winchester 73  /  Broken Arrow)
  • Kirk Douglas  –  1951  –  140  (Ace in the Hole  /  Detective Story)
  • Alec Guinness  –  1952  –  122  (The Lavender Hill Mob  /  The Man in the White Suit  /  The Card)
  • James Dean  –  1955  –  131  (Rebel without a Cause  /  East of Eden)
  • Henry Fonda  –  1957  –  140  (12 Angry Men  /  The Tin Star  /  The Wrong Man)
  • Toshiro Mifune  –  1962  –  139  (Throne of Blood  /  The Lower Depths  /  Sanjuro  /  The Important Man)
  • Toshiro Mifune  –  1963  –  122  (Stray Dog  /  The Bad Sleep Well)
  • Peter Sellers  –  1964  –  122  (Dr. Strangelove  /  A Shot in the Dark  /  The Pink Panther)
  • Robert De Niro  –  1990  –  122  (GoodFellas  /  Awakenings)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis  –  1993  –  148  (In the Name of the Father  /  The Age of Innocence)
  • Anthony Hopkins  –  1993  –  148  (The Remains of the Day  /  Shadowlands)
  • Billy Bob Thornton  –  2001  –  139  (The Man Who Wasn’t There  /  Monster’s Ball)
  • Sean Penn  –  2003  –  131  (Mystic River  /  21 Grams)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio  –  2006  –  122  (The Departed  /  Blood Diamond)

Top 5 Films to win the Nighthawk (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. Sunset Blvd.
  2. Bonnie and Clyde
  3. Chinatown
  4. Touch of Evil
  5. Casablanca

Worst 5 Films to win the Nighthawk (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. Champion
  2. The Last King of Scotland
  3. Educating Rita
  4. Napoleon (1927)
  5. The Last Command

note:  The first four are all ***.5 and the last is a **** film.  Just the way it has worked in this category.

Worst 5 Films to earn a Nighthawk nomination  (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. A Free Soul
  2. The Boys from Brazil
  3. Anne of the Thousand Days
  4. The Keys of the Kingdom
  5. Disraeli

note:  A Free Soul was #5 on the Actress list.  It is the only ** film and Boys is the only **.5.  The others are all mid ***.

Top 10 Shakespeare Performances (original Shakespeare language):

  1. Orson Welles, Chimes at Midnight, 1965/1969
  2. Laurence Olivier, Richard III, 1955/1956
  3. Kenneth Branagh, Henry V, 1989
  4. Kenneth Branagh, Hamlet, 1996
  5. Laurence Olivier, Henry V, 1944/1946
  6. Laurence Olivier, Hamlet, 1948
  7. Ian McKellen, Richard III, 1995
  8. Orson Welles, Othello, 1955
  9. Kenneth Branagh, Much Ado About Nothing, 1993
  10. Juri Jarvet, King Lear, 1971/1977

note:  Jarvet is speaking in Russian but still using the Shakespeare (as opposed to Kurosawa’s films).

Top 5 Tennessee Williams Performances:

  1. Marlon Brando, A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951
  2. Paul Newman, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, 1958
  3. Karl Malden, Baby Doll, 1956
  4. Richard Burton, The Night of the Iguana, 1964
  5. Paul Newman, Sweet Bird of Youth, 1962

Top 5 Royal Performances:

  1. Peter O’Toole, The Lion in Winter, 1968
  2. Colin Firth, The King’s Speech, 2010
  3. Charles Laughton, The Private Life of Henry VIII, 1933
  4. Nigel Hawthorne, The Madness of King George, 1994
  5. Richard Burton, Anne of the Thousand Days, 1969

Top 5 Singer Biopic Performances:

  1. Joaquin Phoenix, Johnny Cash, Walk the Line, 2005
  2. Jamie Foxx, Ray Charles, Ray, 2004
  3. Val Kilmer, Jim Morrison, The Doors, 1991
  4. Laurence Fishburne, Ike Turner, What’s Love Got to Do With It, 1993
  5. Gary Busey, Buddy Holly, The Buddy Holly Story, 1978

Top 5 Performances from Ingmar Bergman Films:

  1. Gunnar Bjornstrand, Winter Light, 1963
  2. Victor Sjostrom, Wild Strawberries, 1957/1959
  3. Erland Josephson, Scenes from a Marriage, 1973/1974
  4. Gunnar Bjornstrand, The Seventh Seal, 1957/1959
  5. Max Von Sydow, Hour of the Wolf, 1968

Top 5 Performances from Alfred Hitchcock Films:

  1. Robert Walker, Strangers on a Train, 1951
  2. Laurence Olivier, Rebecca, 1940
  3. Joseph Cotton, Shadow of a Doubt, 1943
  4. Cary Grant, Notorious, 1959
  5. Anthony Perkins, Psycho, 1960

Top 5 Performances from Akira Kurosawa Films:

  1. Takashi Shimura, Ikiru, 1952/1960
  2. Tatsuya Nakadai, Ran, 1985
  3. Toshiro Mifune, Stray Dog, 1949/1963
  4. Toshiro Mifune, Throne of Blood, 1957/1962
  5. Tatsuya Nakadai, Kagemusha, 1980

Top 10 Performances from Sidney Lumet Films:

  1. Rod Steiger, The Pawnbroker, 1965
  2. Al Pacino, Serpico, 1973
  3. Al Pacino, Dog Day Afternoon, 1975
  4. Paul Newman, The Verdict, 1982
  5. William Holden, Network, 1976
  6. Richard Burton, Equus, 1977
  7. Peter Finch, Network, 1976
  8. Henry Fonda, 12 Angry Men, 1957
  9. Ralph Richardson, Long Day’s Journey Into Night, 1962
  10. Albert Finney, Murder on the Orient Express, 1974

Top 10 Performances from Martin Scorsese Films:

  1. Robert De Niro, Raging Bull, 1980
  2. Daniel Day-Lewis, Gangs of New York, 2002
  3. Robert De Niro, Taxi Driver, 1976
  4. Leonardo DiCaprio, The Aviator, 2004
  5. Ray Liotta, GoodFellas, 1990
  6. Robert De Niro, GoodFellas, 1990
  7. Daniel Day-Lewis, The Age of Innocence, 1993
  8. Leonardo DiCaprio, The Departed, 2006
  9. Paul Newman, The Color of Money, 1986
  10. Robert De Niro, The King of Comedy, 1983

Top 5 Performances from Billy Wilder Films:

  1. William Holden, Sunset Blvd., 1950
  2. Ray Milland, The Lost Weekend, 1945
  3. Jack Lemmon, The Apartment, 1960
  4. William Holden, Stalag 17, 1953
  5. Kirk Douglas, Ace in the Hole, 1951

Top 5 Performances from William Wyler Films:

  1. Fredric March, The Best Years of Our Lives, 1946
  2. Laurence Olivier, Wuthering Heights, 1939
  3. Kirk Douglas, Detective Story, 1951
  4. Laurence Olivier, Carrie, 1952
  5. Walter Huston, Dodsworth, 1936

Top 20 Self-Directed Performances

  1. Orson Welles, Citizen Kane, 1941
  2. Orson Welles, Touch of Evil, 1958
  3. Warren Beatty, Reds, 1981
  4. Clint Eastwood, Unforgiven, 1992
  5. Orson Welles, Chimes at Midnight, 1965/1969
  6. Laurence Olivier, Richard III, 1955/1956
  7. Kenneth Branagh, Henry V, 1989
  8. Kenneth Branagh, Hamlet, 1948
  9. Laurence Olivier, Henry V, 1944/1946
  10. Laurence Olivier, Hamlet, 1948
  11. Charlie Chaplin, Modern Times, 1936
  12. Charlie Chaplin, The Great Dictator, 1940
  13. Woody Allen, Annie Hall, 1977
  14. Kenneth Branagh, Much Ado About Nothing, 1993
  15. Charlie Chaplin, City Lights, 1931
  16. Charlie Chaplin, The Gold Rush, 1925/1926
  17. Clint Eastwood, Million Dollar Baby, 2004
  18. Gene Kelly, Singin’ in the Rain, 1952
  19. Orson Welles, Othello, 1952/1955
  20. Warren Beatty, Bulworth, 1998

The Full List of Nighthawk Winners and What Other Awards They Won or Were Nominated For

  • 1912-26:  Lon Chaney, The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • 1927-28:  Emil Jannings, The Last Command  (Oscar)
  • 1928-29:  Albert Dieudonne, Napoleon
  • 1929-30:  Lew Ayres, All Quiet on the Western Front
  • 1930-31:  Charlie Chaplin, City Lights
  • 1931-32:  Fredric March, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde  (Oscar)
  • 1932-33:  Peter Lorre, M
  • 1934:  William Powell, The Thin Man  (Oscar)
  • 1935:  Charles Laughton, Mutiny on the Bounty  (NYFC, Oscar)
  • 1936:  Charlie Chaplin, Modern TImes
  • 1937:  Fredric March, A Star is Born  (Oscar)
  • 1938:  Leslie Howard, Pygmalion  (Oscar)
  • 1939:  James Stewart, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington  (NYFC, Oscar)
  • 1940:  Henry Fonda, The Grapes of Wrath  (Oscar)
  • 1941:  Orson Welles, Citizen Kane  (Oscar)
  • 1942:  James Cagney, Yankee Doodle Dandy  (Oscar, NYFC)
  • 1943:  Humphrey Bogart, Casablanca  (Oscar)
  • 1944:  Charles Boyer, Gaslight  (Oscar)
  • 1945:  Ray Milland, The Lost Weekend  (Oscar, Globe, NYFC, NBR)
  • 1946:  James Stewart, It’s a Wonderful Life  (Oscar)
  • 1947:  Nicolai Cherkasov, Ivan the Terrible Part I
  • 1948:  Humphrey Bogart, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre  (NBR)
  • 1949:  Kirk Douglas, Champion  (Oscar)
  • 1950:  William Holden, Sunset Blvd.  (Oscar)
  • 1951:  Marlon Brando, A Streetcar Named Desire  (Oscar)
  • 1952:  Gary Cooper, High Noon  (Oscar, Globe)
  • 1953:  William Holden, Stalag 17  (Oscar)
  • 1954:  Marlon Brando, On the Waterfront  (NYFC, Oscar, Globe, BAFTA)
  • 1955:  James Dean, Rebel without a Cause  (BAFTA)
  • 1956:  Laurence Olivier, Richard III  (BAFTA, Oscar)
  • 1957:  Alec Guinness, The Bridge on the River Kwai  (NYFC, NBR, Oscar, Globe, BAFTA)
  • 1958:  Orson Welles, Touch of Evil
  • 1959:  Victor Sjostrom, Wild Strawberries  (NBR, BAFTA)
  • 1960:  Takashi Shimura, Ikiru  (BAFTA)
  • 1961:  Paul Newman, The Hustler  (BAFTA, Oscar, Globe)
  • 1962:  Peter O’Toole, Lawrence of Arabia  (BAFTA, Oscar, Globe)
  • 1963:  Gunnar Bjornstrand, Winter Light
  • 1964:  Peter Sellers, Dr. Strangelove  (Oscar, BAFTA)
  • 1965:  Rod Steiger, The Pawnbroker  (BAFTA, Oscar, Globe)
  • 1966:  Richard Burton, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf  (BAFTA, Oscar, Globe)
  • 1967:  Warren Beatty, Bonnie and Clyde  (Oscar, BAFTA, Globe)
  • 1968:  Peter O’Toole, The Lion in Winter  (Globe, Oscar)
  • 1969:  Orson Welles, Chimes at Midnight  (BAFTA)
  • 1970:  Jack Nicholson, Five Easy Pieces  (Oscar, Globe)
  • 1971:  Gene Hackman, The French Connection  (NYFC, NBR, Oscar, Globe, BAFTA)
  • 1972:  Michael Caine, Sleuth  (Oscar, Globe)
  • 1973:  Marlon Brando, Last Tango in Paris  (NYFC, NSFC, Oscar, BAFTA)
  • 1974:  Jack Nicholson, Chinatown  (NYFC, NSFC, BAFTA, Globe, Oscar)
  • 1975:  Jack Nicholson, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest  (NYFC, NSFC, NBR, Oscar, BAFTA, Globe)
  • 1976:  Robert De Niro, Taxi Driver  (NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, Oscar, BAFTA, Globe)
  • 1977:  Klaus Kinski, Aguirre the Wrath of God
  • 1978:  Robert De Niro, The Deer Hunter  (Oscar, BAFTA, Globe)
  • 1979:  Peter Sellers, Being There  (NBR, Globe, Oscar, BAFTA)
  • 1980:  Robert De Niro, Raging Bull  (NYFC, LAFC, BSFC, NBR, Oscar, Globe, BAFTA)
  • 1981:  Warren Beatty, Reds  (Oscar, BAFTA, Globe)
  • 1982:  Paul Newman, The Verdict  (Oscar, Globe)
  • 1983:  Michael Caine, Educating Rita  (BAFTA, Globe, Oscar)
  • 1984:  Tom Hulce, Amadeus  (Oscar, Globe)
  • 1985:  William Hurt, Kiss of the Spider Woman  (LAFC, NBR, Oscar, BAFTA, Globe)
  • 1986:  Bob Hoskins, The Color of Money  (NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, BAFTA, Globe, Oscar)
  • 1987:  William Hurt, Broadcast News  (BSFC, Oscar, Globe)
  • 1988:  Dustin Hoffman, Rain Man  (Oscar, Globe, BAFTA)
  • 1989:  Daniel Day-Lewis, My Left Foot  (NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, Oscar, BAFTA, Globe)
  • 1990:  Ray Liotta, GoodFellas
  • 1991:  Anthony Hopkins, The Silence of the Lambs  (NYFC, BSFC – supporting, NBR – supporting, CFC, Oscar, BAFTA, Globe)
  • 1992:  Clint Eastwood, Unforgiven  (LAFC, Oscar)
  • 1993:  Daniel Day-Lewis, In the Name of the Father  (BSFC, Oscar, BAFTA, Globe)
  • 1994:  Johnny Depp, Ed Wood  (Globe)
  • 1995:  Nicolas Cage, Leaving Las Vegas  (NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR, Oscar, SAG, Globe, BAFTA)
  • 1996:  Ralph Fiennes, The English Paient  (Oscar, BAFTA, SAG, Globe)
  • 1997:  Ian Holm, The Sweet Hereafter
  • 1998:  Ian McKellen, Gods and Monsters  (LAFC, CFC, NBR, BFCA, Oscar, Globe, SAG)
  • 1999:  Kevin Spacey, American Beauty  (CFC, Oscar, BAFTA, SAG, Globe)
  • 2000:  Michael Douglas, Wonder Boys  (LAFC, Globe, BAFTA)
  • 2001:  Tom Wilkinson, In the Bedroom  (NYFC, Oscar, BAFTA, SAG)
  • 2002:  Daniel Day-Lewis, Gangs of New York  (NYFC, LAFC, CFC, BAFTA, SAG, BFCA, Oscar, Globe)
  • 2003:  Bill Murray, Lost in Translation  (NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, BAFTA, Globe, Oscar, SAG, BFCA)
  • 2004:  Leonardo DiCaprio, The Aviator  (Globe, Oscar, BAFTA, SAG, BFCA)
  • 2005:  Heath Ledger, Brokeback Mountain  (NYFC, Oscar, BAFTA, SAG, Globe, BFCA)
  • 2006:  Forest Whitaker, Last King of Scotland  (NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR, Oscar, BAFTA, Globe, SAG, BFCA)
  • 2007:  Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood  (NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, CFC, Oscar, BAFTA, Globe, SAG, BFCA)
  • 2008:  Sean Penn, Milk  (NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, Oscar, SAG, BFCA, BAFTA, Globe)
  • 2009:  Jeremy Renner, The Hurt Locker  (NSFC, BSFC, CFC, Oscar, BAFTA, SAG, BFCA)
  • 2010:  Colin Firth, The King’s Speech  (NYFC, LAFC, CFC, Oscar, BAFTA, Globe, SAG, BFCA)
  • 2011:  George Clooney, The Descendents  (NBR, BFCA, Globe, Oscar, BAFTA, SAG)

The Full List of Nighthawk Drama Winners (if they didn’t win the Nighthawk Award itself)

note:  No listing of other awards – it takes a long time to type.

  • 1931:  James Cagney, The Public Enemy
  • 1934:  Leslie Howard, Of Human Bondage
  • 1936:  Leslie Howard, The Petrified Forest
  • 1938:  James Cagney, Angels with Dirty Faces
  • 1942:  Ronald Colman, Random Harvest
  • 1964:  Tatsuya Nakadai, Harakiri
  • 1979:  Dustin Hoffman, Kramer vs. Kramer
  • 1983:  Robert De Niro, King of Comedy
  • 1984:  Albert Finney, Under the Volcano
  • 1987:  Michael Douglas, Wall Street
  • 1994:  Ralph Fiennes, Quiz Show
  • 2000:  Jamie Bell, Billy Elliot
  • 2003:  Sean Penn, Mystic River

The Full List of Nighthawk Comedy / Musical Winners (including those that won the Nighthawk Award itself – those are in red)

note:  No listing of other awards – it takes a long time to type.  The films in bold also won the Actress award in Comedy / Musical.

  • 1926:  Charlie Chaplin, The Gold Rush
  • 1928:  Charlie Chaplin, The Circus
  • 1929:  Buster Keaton,  Steamboat Bill Jr.
  • 1930:  Erich von Stroheim,  The Great Gabbo
  • 1931:  Charlie Chaplin,  City Lights
  • 1932:  Groucho Marx,  Horse Feathers
  • 1933:  James Cagney,  Footlight Parade
  • 1934:  William Powell,  The Thin Man
  • 1935:  James Cagney,  A Midsummer Night’s Dream
  • 1936:  Charlie Chaplin,  Modern Times
  • 1937:  Cary Grant,  The Awful Truth
  • 1938:  Leslie Howard,  Pygmalion
  • 1939:  Melvyn Douglas,  Ninotchka
  • 1940:  Charlie Chaplin,  The Great Dictator
  • 1941:  Robert Montgomery,  Here Comes Mr. Jordan
  • 1942:  James Cagney,  Yankee Doodle Dandy
  • 1943:  Claude Rains,  The Phantom of the Opera
  • 1944:  Cary Grant,  Arsenic and Old Lace
  • 1945:  Gene Kelly, Anchors Aweigh
  • 1946:  Robert Donat,  Vacation from Marriage
  • 1947:  Charlie Chaplin,  Monsieur Verdoux
  • 1948:  Spencer Tracy,  State of the Union
  • 1949:  Fred Astaire,  The Barkleys of Broadway
  • 1950:  James Stewart,  Harvey
  • 1951:  Gene Kelly,  An American in Paris
  • 1952:  Alec Guinness,  The Lavender Hill Mob
  • 1953:  David Niven,  The Moon is Blue
  • 1954:  James Mason,  A Star is Born
  • 1955:  Henry Fonda,  Mister Roberts
  • 1956:  Yul Brynner,  The King and I
  • 1957:  Frank Sinatra,  Pal Joey
  • 1958:  Gunnar Bjornstrand,  Smiles of a Summer Night
  • 1959:  Jack Lemmon,  Some Like It Hot
  • 1960:  Jack Lemmon,  The Apartment
  • 1961:  James Cagney,  One, Two, Three
  • 1962:  Robert Preston,  The Music Man
  • 1963:  Albert Finney, Tom Jones
  • 1964:  Peter Sellers, Dr. Strangelove
  • 1965:  Jason Robards, A Thousand Clowns
  • 1966:  Alan Arkin, The Russians are Coming, the Russians are Coming
  • 1967:  Dustin Hoffman, The Graduate
  • 1968:  Zero Mostel, The Producers
  • 1969:  Paul Newman, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
  • 1970:  Alan Arkin, Catch-22
  • 1971:  Malcolm McDowell, A Clockwork Orange
  • 1972:  Charlie Chaplin, Limelight
  • 1973:  Robert Redford, The Sting
  • 1974:  Gene Wilder, Young Frankenstein
  • 1975:  Walter Matthau, The Sunshine Boys
  • 1976:  Giancarlo Giannini, Seven Beauties
  • 1977:  Woody Allen, Annie Hall
  • 1978:  Warren Beatty, Heaven Can Wait
  • 1979:  Peter Sellers, Being There
  • 1980:  Peter O’Toole, The Stunt Man
  • 1981:  Harrison Ford, Raiders of the Lost Ark
  • 1982:  Dustin Hoffman, Tootsie
  • 1983:  Michael Caine, Educating Rita
  • 1984:  Tom Hulce, Amadeus
  • 1985:  Jack Nicholson, Prizzi’s Honor
  • 1986:  Dexter Gordon, ’round Midnight
  • 1987:  William Hurt, Broadcast News
  • 1988:  Bob Hoskins, Who Framed Roger Rabbit
  • 1989:  John Cusack, Say Anything
  • 1990:  Bill Murray, Quick Change
  • 1991:  Robin Williams, The Fisher King
  • 1992:  Tim Robbins, The Player
  • 1993:  Kenneth Branagh, Much Ado About Nothing
  • 1994:  Johnny Depp, Ed Wood
  • 1995:  Hugh Grant, An Awfully Big Adventure
  • 1996:  Ewan McGregor, Trainspotting
  • 1997:  Jack Nicholson, As Good as it Gets
  • 1998:  George Clooney, Out of Sight
  • 1999:  George Clooney, Three Kings
  • 2000:  Michael Douglas, Wonder Boys
  • 2001:  Gene Hackman, The Royal Tenenbaums
  • 2002:  Nicolas Cage, Adaptation
  • 2003:  Bill Murray, Lost in Translation
  • 2004:  Jim Carrey, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
  • 2005:  Joaquin Phoenix, Walk the Line
  • 2006:  Aaron Eckhart, Thank You for Smoking
  • 2007:  Johnny Depp, Sweeney Todd
  • 2008:  Brendan Gleeson, In Bruges
  • 2009:  George Clooney, Up in the Air
  • 2010:  Paul Giamatti, Barney’s Version
  • 2011:  Jean Dujardin, The Artist

Ten Best Performances Not to Win the Nighthawk:

  1. Humphrey Bogart, The Maltese Falcon, 1941
  2. Al Pacino, Serpico, 1973
  3. Anthony Hopkins, The Remains of the Day, 1993
  4. Jack Lemmon, The Apartment, 1960
  5. Adrien Brody, The Pianist, 2002
  6. Al Pacino, Dog Day Afternoon, 1975
  7. Fredric March, The Best Years of Our Lives, 1946
  8. Michael Caine, The Quiet American, 2002
  9. Paul Scofield, A Man for All Seasons, 1966
  10. George C. Scott, Patton, 1970

5 Best Years:

  1. 2002  (Daniel Day-Lewis (Gangs of New York), Adrien Brody (The Pianist), Michael Caine (The Quiet American), Nicolas Cage (Adaptation), Tom Hanks (Road to Perdition))
  2. 1951  (Marlon Brando (A Streetcar Named Desire), Humphrey Bogart (The African Queen), Kirk Douglas (Ace in the Hole, Detective Story), Robert Walker (Strangers on a Train))
  3. 1993  (Daniel Day-Lewis (In the Name of the Father), Anthony Hopkins (The Remains of the Day, Shadowlands), Daniel Day-Lewis (The Age of Innocence), Liam Neeson (Schindler’s List))
  4. 1996  (Ralph Fiennes (The English Patient), Kenneth Branagh (Hamlet), Daniel Day-Lewis (The Crucible), Ewan McGregor (Trainspotting), Chris Cooper (Lone Star))
  5. 1960  (Takashi Shimua (Ikiru), Jack Lemmon (The Apartment), Alec Guinness, John Mills (Tunes of Glory), Burt Lancaster (Elmer Gantry))

5 Best Drama Years:

  1. 1951  (Marlon Brando (A Streetcar Named Desire), Humphrey Bogart (The African Queen), Kirk Douglas (Ace in the Hole, Detective Story), Robert Walker (Strangers on a Train))
  2. 1993  (Daniel Day-Lewis (In the Name of the Father), Anthony Hopkins (The Remains of the Day, Shadowlands), Daniel Day-Lewis (The Age of Innocence), Liam Neeson (Schindler’s List))
  3. 1996  (Ralph Fiennes (The English Patient), Kenneth Branagh (Hamlet), Daniel Day-Lewis (The Crucible), Chris Cooper (Lone Star), Liam Neeson (Michael Collins))
  4. 1974  (Jack Nicholson (Chinatown), Al Pacino (The Godfather Part II), Gene Hackman (The Conversation), Erland Josephson (Scenes from a Marriage), Dustin Hoffman (Lenny))
  5. 1989  (Daniel Day-Lewis (My Left Foot), Kenneth Branagh (Henry V), Tom Cruise (Born on the Fourth of July), Kevin Costner (Field of Dreams), Matt Dillon (Drugstore Cowboy))

5 Best Comedy Years:

  1. 1998  (George Clooney (Out of Sight), Jeff Bridges (The Big Lebowski), Jim Carrey (The Truman Show), Warren Beatty (Bulworth), John Travolta (Primary Colors))
  2. 2003  (Bill Murray (Lost in Translation), Johnny Depp (Pirates of the Caribbean), Paul Giamatti (American Splendor), Peter Dinklage (The Station Agent), Ewan McGregor (Big Fish))
  3. 1988  (Bob Hoskins (Who Framed Roger Rabbit), Forest Whitaker (Bird), Kevin Costner (Bull Durham), Tom Hanks (Big), William Hurt (The Accidental Tourist))
  4. 1964  (Peter Sellers (Dr. Strangelove), George C. Scott (Dr. Strangelove), Rex Harrison (My Fair Lady), James Garner (The Americanization of Emily), Peter Sellers (A Shot in the Dark))
  5. 2004  (Jim Carrey (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind), Paul Giamatti (Sideways), Jamie Foxx (Ray), Danny Huston (Silver City), Bill Murray (The Life Aquatic))

Top 5 Sixth Place Finishers:

  1. Tom Cruise, Jerry Maguire, 1996
  2. Jack Nicholson, About Schmidt, 2002
  3. Martin Sheen, Badlands, 1974
  4. Joaquin Phoenix, Walk the Line, 2005
  5. Kenneth Branagh, Much Ado About Nothing, 1993

The Best Actor By Finish in The Respective Years

  • 1st  –  Marlon Brando, A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951
  • 2nd  –  Humphrey Bogart, The Maltese Falcon, 1941
  • 3rd  –  Michael Caine, The Quiet American, 2002
  • 4th  –  Burt Lancaster, Elmer Gantry, 1960
  • 5th  –  Robert Walker, Strangers on a Train, 1951
  • 6th  –  Tom Cruise, Jerry Maguire, 1996
  • 7th  –  Kevin Costner, A Perfect World, 1993
  • 8th  –  Tom Hanks, Philadelphia, 1993
  • 9th  –  Brendan Gleeson, The General, 1998
  • 10th  –  Javier Bardem, Mar Adentro, 2004
  • 11th  –  Ben Kingsley, House of Sand and Fog, 2003
  • 12th  –  Erland Josephson, Saraband, 2005
  • 13th  –  David Thewliss, Naked, 1993
  • 14th  –  Mathieu Amalric, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, 2007
  • 15th  –  Denzel Washington, Philadelphia, 1993
  • 16th  –  Clint Eastwood, Absolute Power, 1997
  • 17th  –  Christian Bale, Batman Begins, 2005
  • 18th  –  Dylan Baker, Happiness, 1998
  • 19th  –  Mario Van Peebles, Baadasssss, 2005
  • 20th  –  Frank Langella, Starting Out in the Evening, 2007


Consensus Awards

Most Awards (not including the Nighthawk):

  • Forest Whitaker, Last King of Scotland, 2006  –  11  (Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA, NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR)
  • Philip Seymour Hoffman, Capote, 2005  –  10  (Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR)
  • Nicolas Cage, Leaving Las Vegas, 1995  – 9  (Oscar, SAG, Globe, NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood, 2007  –  9  (Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA, NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, CFC)

Most Awards Points:

  1. Forest Whitaker, Last King of Scotland, 2006  –  700
  2. Philip Seymour Hoffman, Capote, 2005  –  630
  3. Nicolas Cage, Leaving Las Vegas, 1995  –  609
  4. Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood, 2007  –  581
  5. Bill Murray, Lost in Translation, 2003  –  546

Highest Awards Percentage (post-1942):

  1. Ray Milland, The Lost Weekend, 1945  –  63.64%
  2. Paul Lukas, Watch on the Rhine, 1943  –  57.45%
  3. Laurence Olivier, Hamlet, 1948  –  49.09%
  4. Bing Crosby, Going My Way, 1944  –  47.62%
  5. Nicolas Cage, Leaving Las Vegas, 1995  –  45.96%

Performances That Won the Oscar, BAFTA and Globe (1952-1994):

  • Marlon Brando, On the Waterfront, 1954
  • Ernest Borgnine, Marty, 1955
  • Alec Guinness, The Bridge on the River Kwai, 1957
  • Lee Marvin, Cat Ballou, 1965
  • Paul Scofield, A Man for all Seasons, 1966
  • Rod Steiger, In the Heat of the Night, 1967
  • Gene Hackman, The French Connection, 1971
  • Jack Nicholson, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, 1975
  • Peter Finch, Network, 1976
  • Richard Dreyfuss, The Goodbye Girl, 1977
  • Ben Kingsley, Gandhi, 1982

Performances That Won the Oscar, BAFTA, Globe, SAG and BFCA:

  • Geoffrey Rush, Shine, 1996
  • Jamie Foxx, Ray, 2004
  • Philip Seymour Hoffman, Capote, 2005
  • Forest Whitaker, Last King of Scotland, 2006
  • Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood, 2007
  • Colin Firth, The King’s Speech, 2010

note:  the following lists only count 1945 on, after the NBR added a fourth award to the mix.

Consensus Blowouts  (Winners over 40%, no one else over 20%)

  • 1945:  Ray Milland (The Lost Weekend) at 63.64%, no one else above 9.09%
  • 1948:  Laurence Olivier (Hamlet) at 49.09%, no one else above 14.55%
  • 1970:  George C. Scott (Patton) at 44.95%, no one else above 7.80%
  • 1980:  Robert De Niro (Raging Bull) at 44.36%, no one else above 13.91%
  • 1995:  Nicolas Cage (Leaving Las Vegas) at 45.96%, no one else above 7.92%
  • 2005:  Philip Seymour Hoffman (Capote) at 41.18%, no one else above 14.87%
  • 2006:  Forest Whitaker (Last King of Scotland) at 43.61%, no one else above 14.95%

Consensus Top Two  (Two both over 25% or over 20% post-1967, within 5% of each other)

  • 1947:  Ronald Colman (A Double Life) over William Powell (Life with Father), 30.91% to 27.27%
  • 1985:  William Hurt (Kiss of the Spider Woman) over Jack Nicholson (Prizzi’s Honor), 29.43% to 28.37%
  • 1997:  Jack Nicholson (As Good as it Gets) over Robert Duvall (The Apostle), 23.89% to 21.11%
  • 2009:  Jeff Bridges (Crazy Heart) over Jeremy Renner (The Hurt Locker), 22.42% to 20.63%

note:  In all four of these cases, the Oscar made the difference for the winner.
note:  In 1947, Michael Redgrave (Mourning Becomes Electra) is a close third (23.64%).
note:  In 2009, George Clooney (Up in the Air) is a close third (18.16%).

Consensus Wide Open Field  (No one over 20%, all five above 10% – see chart below for the five actresses)

  • 1987, range from 19.61% to 11.11%, includes four Oscar nominees

Consensus Chart

note:  The chart below I imported from Excel and I hope it isn’t too confusing.  It’s about as big as I could make to still have it fit.  I only include names because if an actress earned points from multiple films, I counted them together.  I also couldn’t get the borders to copy over, so it’s as readable as I could make it.
note:  There might be errors below because I changed the formula during the process.  If you see mistakes, please don’t point them out.  This list was not originally made for public viewing and I didn’t care if the names were spelled right so please don’t point that out either.

Year Actor AA GG crit BAFTA SAG BFCA RT WT N W % Rk
1928 Jannings, Emil 105 105 105 2 1 50.00% 1
1928 Barthelmess, Richard 70 70 70 1 1 33.33% 2
1928 Chaplin, Charlie 35 35 35 1 0 16.67% 3
1929 Baxter, Warner 70 70 70 1 1 33.33% 1
1929 Bancroft, George 35 35 35 1 0 16.67% 2
1929 Morris, Chester 35 35 35 1 0 16.67% 2
1929 Muni, Paul 35 35 35 1 0 16.67% 2
1929 Stone, Lewis 35 35 35 1 0 16.67% 2
1930 Arliss, George 105 105 105 2 1 33.33% 1
1930 Chevalier, Maurice 70 70 70 1 1 22.22% 2
1930 Colman, Ronald 70 70 70 1 1 22.22% 2
1930 Beery, Wallace 35 35 35 1 0 11.11% 5
1930 Tibbett, Lawrence 35 35 35 1 0 11.11% 5
1931 Barrymore, Lionel 70 70 70 1 1 33.33% 1
1931 Cooper, Jackie 35 35 35 1 0 16.67% 2
1931 Dix, Richard 35 35 35 1 0 16.67% 2
1931 March, Frederic 35 35 35 1 0 16.67% 2
1931 Menjou, Adolphe 35 35 35 1 0 16.67% 2
1932 Beery, Wallace 70 70 70 1 1 40.00% 1
1932 March, Frederic 70 70 70 1 1 40.00% 1
1932 Lunt, Alfred 35 35 35 1 0 20.00% 3
1933 Laughton, Charles 70 70 70 1 1 50.00% 1
1933 Howard, Leslie 35 35 35 1 0 25.00% 2
1933 Muni, Paul 35 35 35 1 0 25.00% 2
1934 Gable, Clark 70 70 70 1 1 50.00% 1
1934 Morgan, Frank 35 35 35 1 0 25.00% 2
1934 Powell, William 35 35 35 1 0 25.00% 2
1935 Laughton, Charles 35 70 105 105 2 1 42.86% 1
1935 McLaglen, Victor 70 70 70 1 1 28.57% 2
1935 Gable, Clark 35 35 35 1 0 14.29% 3
1935 Tone, Franchot 35 35 35 1 0 14.29% 3
1936 Huston, Walter 35 70 105 105 2 1 37.50% 1
1936 Muni, Paul 70 70 70 1 1 25.00% 2
1936 Powell, William 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1936 Tracy, Spencer 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1936 Cooper, Gary 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1937 Muni, Paul 35 70 105 105 2 1 37.50% 1
1937 Tracy, Spencer 70 70 70 1 1 25.00% 2
1937 Boyer, Charles 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1937 March, Frederic 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1937 Montgomery, Robert 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1938 Cagney, James 35 70 105 105 2 1 37.50% 1
1938 Tracy, Spencer 70 70 70 1 1 25.00% 2
1938 Boyer, Charles 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1938 Donat, Robert 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1938 Howard, Leslie 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1939 Stewart, James 35 70 105 105 2 1 37.50% 1
1939 Donat, Robert 70 70 70 1 1 25.00% 2
1939 Gable, Clark 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1939 Olivier, Laurence 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1939 Rooney, Mickey 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1940 Chaplin, Charles 35 70 105 105 2 1 37.50% 1
1940 Stewart, James 70 70 70 1 1 25.00% 2
1940 Fonda, Henry 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1940 Massey, Raymond 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1940 Olivier, Laurence 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 3
1941 Cooper, Gary 70 70 140 140 2 2 50.00% 1
1941 Grant, Cary 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 2
1941 Huston, Walter 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 2
1941 Montgomery, Robert 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 2
1941 Welles, Orson 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 2
1942 Cagney, James 70 70 140 140 2 2 50.00% 1
1942 Pidgeon, Walter 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 2
1942 Woolley, Monty 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 2
1942 Colman, Ronald 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 2
1942 Cooper, Gary 35 35 35 1 0 12.50% 2
1943 Lukas, Paul 70 70 70 210 189 3 3 57.45% 1
1943 Bogart, Humphrey 35 35 35 1 0 10.64% 2
1943 Cooper, Gary 35 35 35 1 0 10.64% 2
1943 Pidgeon, Walter 35 35 35 1 0 10.64% 2
1943 Rooney, Mickey 35 35 35 1 0 10.64% 2
1944 Crosby, Bing 70 70 140 140 2 2 47.62% 1
1944 Knox, Alexander 35 70 105 84 2 1 28.57% 2
1944 Boyer, Charles 35 35 35 1 0 11.90% 3
1944 Grant, Cary 35 35 35 1 0 11.90% 3
1945 Milland, Ray 70 70 126 266 245 4 4 63.64% 1
1945 Crosby, Bing 35 35 35 1 0 9.09% 2
1945 Kelly, Gene 35 35 35 1 0 9.09% 2
1945 Peck, Gregory 35 35 35 1 0 9.09% 2
1945 Wilde, Cornel 35 35 35 1 0 9.09% 2
1946 Olivier, Laurence 35 126 161 161 3 2 41.82% 1
1946 Peck, Gregory 35 70 105 84 2 1 21.82% 2
1946 March, Frederic 70 70 70 1 1 18.18% 3
1946 Parks, Larry 35 35 35 1 0 9.09% 4
1946 Stewart, James 35 35 35 1 0 9.09% 4
1947 Colman, Ronald 70 70 140 119 2 2 30.91% 1
1947 Powell, William 35 70 105 105 2 1 27.27% 2
1947 Redgrave, Michael 35 56 91 91 2 1 23.64% 3
1947 Garfield, John 35 35 35 1 0 9.09% 4
1947 Peck, Gregory 35 35 35 1 0 9.09% 4
1948 Olivier, Laurence 70 70 70 210 189 3 3 49.09% 1
1948 Bogart, Humphrey 56 56 56 1 1 14.55% 2
1948 Ayres, Lew 35 35 35 1 0 9.09% 3
1948 Clift, Montgomery 35 35 35 1 0 9.09% 3
1948 Dailey, Dan 35 35 35 1 0 9.09% 3
1948 Webb, Clifton 35 35 35 1 0 9.09% 3
1949 Crawford, Broderick 70 70 70 210 189 3 3 44.58% 1
1949 Peck, Gregory 35 70 105 105 2 1 24.76% 2
1949 Todd, Richard 35 35 70 60 2 0 14.03% 3
1949 Douglas, Kirk 35 35 35 1 0 8.25% 4
1949 Wayne, John 35 35 35 1 0 8.25% 4
1950 Ferrer, Jose 70 70 140 119 2 2 25.76% 1
1950 Calhern, Louis 35 35 70 60 2 0 12.88% 2
1950 Stewart, James 35 35 70 60 2 0 12.88% 2
1950 Guinness, Alec 56 56 56 1 1 12.12% 4
1950 Astaire, Fred 70 70 49 1 1 10.61% 5
1950 Holden, William 35 35 35 1 0 7.58% x
1950 Tracy, Spencer 35 35 35 1 0 7.58% x
1950 Dailey, Dan 35 35 25 1 0 5.30% x
1950 Lloyd, Harold 35 35 25 1 0 5.30% x
1951 Kennedy, Arthur 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 20.33% 1
1951 March, Frederic 35 70 35 140 119 3 1 18.68% 2
1951 Bogart, Humphrey 70 35 105 105 2 1 16.48% 3
1951 Basehart, Richard 56 56 56 1 1 8.79% 4
1951 Kaye, Danny 70 70 49 1 1 7.69% 5
1951 Brando, Marlon 35 35 35 1 0 5.49% x
1951 Clift, Montgomery 35 35 35 1 0 5.49% x
1951 Golisano, Francesco 35 35 35 1 0 5.49% x
1951 Crosby, Bing 35 35 25 1 0 3.85% x
1951 Kelly, Gene 35 35 25 1 0 3.85% x
1951 Douglas, Kirk 35 35 25 1 0 3.85% x
1952 Richardson, Ralph 126 70 196 196 3 3 23.82% 1
1952 Cooper, Gary 70 70 140 119 2 2 14.46% 2
1952 Brando, Marlon 35 70 105 105 2 1 12.76% 3
1952 O’Connor, Donald 70 70 49 1 1 5.95% 4
1952 Douglas, Kirk 35 35 35 1 0 4.25% 5
1952 Ferrer, Jose 35 35 35 1 0 4.25% 5
1952 Guinness, Alec 35 35 35 1 0 4.25% 5
1952 Fresnay, Pierre 35 35 35 1 0 4.25% 5
1952 Hawkins, Jack 35 35 35 1 0 4.25% 5
1952 Olivier, Laurence 35 35 35 1 0 4.25% 5
1952 Patrick, Nigel 35 35 35 1 0 4.25% 5
1952 Sim, Alistair 35 35 35 1 0 4.25% 5
1952 Kaye, Danny 35 35 25 1 0 2.98% x
1952 Boyer, Charles 35 35 25 1 0 2.98% x
1952 Milland, Ray 35 35 25 1 0 2.98% x
1953 Lancaster, Burt 35 70 105 105 2 1 12.30% 1
1953 Brando, Marlon 35 70 105 105 2 1 12.30% 1
1953 Tracy, Spencer 70 35 105 84 2 1 9.84% 3
1953 Holden, William 70 70 70 1 1 8.20% 4
1953 Gielgud, John 70 70 70 1 1 8.20% 4
1953 Mason, James 56 56 56 1 1 6.56% x
1953 Niven, David 70 70 49 1 1 5.74% x
1953 Burton, Richard 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% x
1953 Clift, Montgomery 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% x
1953 Hawkins, Jack 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% x
1953 Heflin, Van 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% x
1953 Howard, Trevor 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% x
1953 Laydu, Claude 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% x
1953 Macrae, Duncan 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% x
1953 Mouloudji, Marcel 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% x
1953 Peck, Gregory 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% x
1954 Brando, Marlon 70 70 70 70 280 259 4 4 28.03% 1
1954 More, Kenneth 105 105 105 2 1 11.36% 2
1954 Crosby, Bing 35 56 91 91 2 1 9.85% 3
1954 Mason, James 35 70 105 84 2 1 9.09% 4
1954 Bogart, Humphrey 35 35 35 1 0 3.79% 5
1954 O’Herlihy, Dan 35 35 35 1 0 3.79% 5
1954 Brand, Neville 35 35 35 1 0 3.79% 5
1954 Denham, Maurice 35 35 35 1 0 3.79% 5
1954 Donat, Robert 35 35 35 1 0 3.79% 5
1954 Ferrer, Jose 35 35 35 1 0 3.79% 5
1954 March, Frederic 35 35 35 1 0 3.79% 5
1954 Mills, John 35 35 35 1 0 3.79% 5
1954 Niven, David 35 35 35 1 0 3.79% 5
1954 Stewart, James 35 35 35 1 0 3.79% 5
1954 Wolfit, Donald 35 35 35 1 0 3.79% 5
1955 Borgnine, Ernest 70 70 126 70 336 315 5 5 36.89% 1
1955 Dean, James 35 70 105 105 2 1 12.30% 2
1955 Sinatra, Frank 35 70 105 105 2 1 12.30% 2
1955 Ewell, Tom 70 70 49 1 1 5.74% 4
1955 Cagney, James 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% 5
1955 Tracy, Spencer 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% 5
1955 Guinness, Alec 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% 5
1955 Hawkins, Jack 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% 5
1955 Hayter, James 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% 5
1955 Holden, William 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% 5
1955 More, Kenneth 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% 5
1955 Redgrave, Michael 35 35 35 1 0 4.10% 5
1956 Douglas, Kirk 35 70 70 175 154 3 2 14.67% 1
1956 Brynner, Yul 70 35 56 161 151 3 2 14.33% 2
1956 Olivier, Laurence 35 70 105 105 2 1 10.00% 3
1956 Finch, Peter 70 70 70 1 1 6.67% 4
1956 Perier, Francois 70 70 70 1 1 6.67% 4
1956 Cantinflas 70 70 49 1 1 4.67% x
1956 Dean, James 35 35 35 1 0 3.33% x
1956 Hudson, Rock 35 35 35 1 0 3.33% x
1956 Fresnay, Pierre 35 35 35 1 0 3.33% x
1956 Hawkins, Jack 35 35 35 1 0 3.33% x
1956 Mifune, Toshiro 35 35 35 1 0 3.33% x
1956 More, Kenneth 35 35 35 1 0 3.33% x
1956 Shimura, Takashi 35 35 35 1 0 3.33% x
1956 Tracy, Spencer 35 35 35 1 0 3.33% x
1956 Brando, Marlon 35 35 25 1 0 2.33% x
1956 Ford, Glenn 35 35 25 1 0 2.33% x
1956 Kaye, Danny 35 35 25 1 0 2.33% x
1956 Cooper, Gary 35 35 25 1 0 2.33% x
1956 Heston, Charlton 35 35 25 1 0 2.33% x
1956 Lancaster, Burt 35 35 25 1 0 2.33% x
1956 Malden, Karl 35 35 25 1 0 2.33% x
1957 Guinness, Alec 70 70 126 70 336 315 5 5 25.71% 1
1957 Laughton, Charles 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 7.71% 2
1957 Fonda, Henry 35 70 105 95 2 1 7.71% 2
1957 Brando, Marlon 35 35 70 60 2 0 4.86% 4
1957 Franciosa, Anthony 35 35 70 60 2 0 4.86% 4
1957 Sinatra, Frank 70 70 49 1 1 4.00% x
1957 Finch, Peter 35 35 35 1 0 2.86% x
1957 Gabin, Jean 35 35 35 1 0 2.86% x
1957 Howard, Trevor 35 35 35 1 0 2.86% x
1957 Jurgens, Chad 35 35 35 1 0 2.86% x
1957 Mitchum, Robert 35 35 35 1 0 2.86% x
1957 Olivier, Laurence 35 35 35 1 0 2.86% x
1957 Poitier, Sidney 35 35 35 1 0 2.86% x
1957 Redgrave, Michael 35 35 35 1 0 2.86% x
1957 Quinn, Anthony 35 35 35 1 0 2.86% x
1957 Baseheart, Richard 35 35 35 1 0 2.86% x
1957 Bjornstrand, Gunnar 35 35 35 1 0 2.86% x
1957 Brasseur, Pierre 35 35 35 1 0 2.86% x
1957 Curtis, Tony 35 35 35 1 0 2.86% x
1957 Chevalier, Maurice 35 35 25 1 0 2.00% x
1957 Ford, Glenn 35 35 25 1 0 2.00% x
1957 Niven, David 35 35 25 1 0 2.00% x
1957 Randall, David 35 35 25 1 0 2.00% x
1958 Niven, David 70 70 70 210 189 3 3 16.36% 1
1958 Tracy, Spencer 35 35 56 35 161 151 4 1 13.03% 2
1958 Poitier, Sidney 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 11.21% 3
1958 Curtis, Tony 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 8.18% 4
1958 Newman, Paul 35 35 70 70 2 0 6.06% 5
1958 Howard, Trevor 70 70 70 1 1 6.06% 5
1958 Kaye, Danny 70 70 49 1 1 4.24% x
1958 Brando, Marlon 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1958 Craig, Michael 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1958 Ford, Glenn 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1958 Gabin, Jean 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1958 Johar, IS 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1958 Jurgens, Chad 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1958 Quayle, Anthony 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1958 Thomas, Terry 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1958 Gable, Clark 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1958 Grant, Cary 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1958 Jourdan, Louis 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1958 Chevalier, Maurice 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1958 Donat, Robert 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1959 Lemmon, Jack 35 70 70 175 154 3 2 13.75% 1
1959 Stewart, James 35 70 35 140 140 3 1 12.50% 2
1959 Harvey, Laurence 35 70 105 105 2 1 9.38% 3
1959 Heston, Charlton 70 35 105 95 2 1 8.44% 4
1959 Sjostrom, Victor 56 35 91 91 2 1 8.13% 5
1959 Sellers, Peter 70 70 70 1 1 6.25% x
1959 Burton, Richard 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.31% x
1959 Franciosa, Anthony 70 70 49 1 1 4.38% x
1959 Muni, Paul 35 35 35 1 0 3.13% x
1959 Cybulski, Zbigniew 35 35 35 1 0 3.13% x
1959 Desailly, Jean 35 35 35 1 0 3.13% x
1959 Finch, Peter 35 35 35 1 0 3.13% x
1959 Olivier, Laurence 35 35 35 1 0 3.13% x
1959 Wolfit, Donald 35 35 35 1 0 3.13% x
1959 Gable, Clark 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1959 Grant, Cary 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1959 Martin, Dean 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1959 Poitier, Sidney 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1959 March, Frederic 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1959 Schildkraut, Joseph 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1960 Lancaster, Burt 70 70 70 35 245 224 4 3 19.39% 1
1960 Lemmon, Jack 35 70 70 175 154 3 2 13.33% 2
1960 Olivier, Laurence 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 8.18% 3
1960 Tracy, Spencer 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 8.18% 3
1960 Finch, Peter 70 70 70 1 1 6.06% 5
1960 Howard, Trevor 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.15% x
1960 Mitchum, Robert 56 56 56 1 1 4.85% x
1960 Attenborough, Richard 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1960 Fraser, John 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1960 Guinness, Alec 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1960 Hamilton, George 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1960 March, Frederic 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1960 Mills, John 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1960 Montand, Yves 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1960 Shimura, Takashi 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1960 Bogarde, Dirk 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1960 Cantinflas 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1960 Grant, Cary 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1960 Hope, Bob 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1960 Stockwell, Dean 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1961 Schell, Maximilian 70 70 70 35 245 224 4 3 22.07% 1
1961 Newman, Paul 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 12.76% 2
1961 Finney, Albert 56 35 91 91 2 1 8.97% 3
1961 Finch, Peter 70 70 70 1 1 6.90% 4
1961 Poitier, Sidney 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.86% 5
1961 Ford, Glenn 70 70 49 1 1 4.83% x
1961 Boyer, Charles 35 35 35 1 0 3.45% x
1961 Tracy, Spencer 35 35 35 1 0 3.45% x
1961 Whitman, Stuart 35 35 35 1 0 3.45% x
1961 Bogarde, Dirk 35 35 35 1 0 3.45% x
1961 Ivashov, Vladimir 35 35 35 1 0 3.45% x
1961 Leroy, Philippe 35 35 35 1 0 3.45% x
1961 Sordi, Alberto 35 35 35 1 0 3.45% x
1961 Astaire, Fred 35 35 25 1 0 2.41% x
1961 Beymer, Richard 35 35 25 1 0 2.41% x
1961 Hope, Bob 35 35 25 1 0 2.41% x
1961 MacMurray, Fred 35 35 25 1 0 2.41% x
1961 Beatty, Warren 35 35 25 1 0 2.41% x
1961 Chevalier, Maurice 35 35 25 1 0 2.41% x
1962 Mastroianni, Marcello 35 70 70 175 154 3 2 10.65% 1
1962 Peck, Gregory 70 70 35 175 154 3 2 10.65% 1
1962 Lancaster, Burt 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 8.96% 3
1962 O’Toole, Peter 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 8.96% 3
1962 Lemmon, Jack 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 6.54% 5
1962 Mason, James 35 35 70 60 2 0 4.11% x
1962 Quinn, Anthony 35 35 70 60 2 0 4.11% x
1962 Robards, Jason 56 56 56 1 1 3.87% x
1962 Olivier, Laurence 35 35 35 1 0 2.42% x
1962 Ryan, Robert 35 35 35 1 0 2.42% x
1962 Wilson, Georges 35 35 35 1 0 2.42% x
1962 Attenborough, Richard 35 35 35 1 0 2.42% x
1962 Bates, Alan 35 35 35 1 0 2.42% x
1962 Belmondo, Jean-Paul 35 35 35 1 0 2.42% x
1962 Citti, Franco 35 35 35 1 0 2.42% x
1962 Douglas, Kirk 35 35 35 1 0 2.42% x
1962 Laughton, Charles 35 35 35 1 0 2.42% x
1962 Stewart, James 35 35 25 1 0 1.69% x
1962 Boyd, Stephen 35 35 25 1 0 1.69% x
1962 Durante, Jimmy 35 35 25 1 0 1.69% x
1962 Grant, Cary 35 35 25 1 0 1.69% x
1962 Heston, Charlton 35 35 25 1 0 1.69% x
1962 Malden, Karl 35 35 25 1 0 1.69% x
1962 Preston, Robert 35 35 25 1 0 1.69% x
1962 Sordi, Alberto 35 35 25 1 0 1.69% x
1962 Darin, Bobby 35 35 25 1 0 1.69% x
1962 Gleason, Jackie 35 35 25 1 0 1.69% x
1962 Harvey, Laurence 35 35 25 1 0 1.69% x
1962 Newman, Paul 35 35 25 1 0 1.69% x
1963 Finney, Albert 35 35 70 35 175 165 4 1 14.73% 1
1963 Poitier, Sidney 70 70 35 175 154 3 2 13.79% 2
1963 Harrison, Rex 35 35 56 126 116 3 1 10.34% 3
1963 Newman, Paul 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 8.46% 4
1963 Harris, Richard 35 35 70 70 2 0 6.27% 5
1963 Bogarde, Dirk 70 70 70 1 1 6.27% 5
1963 Grant, Cary 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.33% x
1963 Lemmon, Jack 70 70 49 1 1 4.39% x
1963 Sordi, Alberto 70 70 49 1 1 4.39% x
1963 Courtenay, Tom 35 35 35 1 0 3.13% x
1963 Da Silva, Howard 35 35 35 1 0 3.13% x
1963 Garner, James 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1963 Giallelis, Stathis 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1963 Sinatra, Frank 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1963 Thomas, Terry 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1963 Tryon, Tom 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1963 Winters, Jonathan 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1963 Brando, Marlon 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1963 McQueen, Steve 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1963 Peck, Gregory 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1964 Harrison, Rex 70 70 70 35 245 224 4 3 21.83% 1
1964 Quinn, Anthony 35 35 56 35 161 151 4 1 14.67% 2
1964 Sellers, Peter 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 12.62% 3
1964 O’Toole, Peter 35 70 35 140 119 3 1 11.60% 4
1964 Mastroianni, Marcello 35 70 105 95 2 1 9.21% 5
1964 Attenborough, Richard 70 70 70 1 1 6.82% x
1964 Burton, Richard 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.80% x
1964 Courtenay, Tom 35 35 35 1 0 3.41% x
1964 Hayden, Sterling 35 35 35 1 0 3.41% x
1964 Lemmon, Jack 35 35 35 1 0 3.41% x
1964 Van Dyke, Dick 35 35 25 1 0 2.39% x
1964 Franciosa, Anthony 35 35 25 1 0 2.39% x
1964 March, Frederic 35 35 25 1 0 2.39% x
1965 Marvin, Lee 70 70 56 70 266 245 4 4 21.21% 1
1965 Werner, Oskar 35 35 70 70 210 200 4 2 17.27% 2
1965 Steiger, Rod 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 11.21% 3
1965 Burton, Richard 35 70 105 105 2 1 9.09% 4
1965 Bogarde, Dirk 70 70 70 1 1 6.06% 5
1965 Lemmon, Jack 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.15% x
1965 Poitier, Sidney 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.15% x
1965 Sharif, Omar 70 70 49 1 1 4.24% x
1965 Olivier, Laurence 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1965 Andrews, Harry 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1965 Caine, Michael 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1965 Smoktunovsky, Innokenti 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1965 Lewis, Jerry 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1965 Robards, Jason 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1965 Sordi, Alberto 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1965 Harrison, Rex 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1966 Scofield, Paul 70 70 126 70 336 315 5 5 30.91% 1
1966 Caine, Michael 35 70 63 35 203 182 5 1 17.86% 2
1966 Burton, Richard 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 12.71% 3
1966 Richardson, Ralph 105 105 105 2 1 10.30% 4
1966 Arkin, Alan 35 70 105 84 2 1 8.24% 5
1966 McQueen, Steve 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.84% x
1966 Belmondo, Jean-Paul 35 35 35 1 0 3.43% x
1966 Warner, David 35 35 35 1 0 3.43% x
1966 Bates, Alan 35 35 25 1 0 2.40% x
1966 Jeffries, Lionel 35 35 25 1 0 2.40% x
1966 von Sydow, Max 35 35 25 1 0 2.40% x
1967 Steiger, Rod 70 70 133 70 343 322 5 5 29.19% 1
1967 Tracy, Spencer 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 11.74% 2
1967 Beatty, Warren 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 8.57% 3
1967 Bogarde, Dirk 70 70 70 1 1 6.35% 4
1967 Hoffman, Dustin 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.39% 5
1967 Burton, Richard 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.39% 5
1967 Newman, Paul 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.39% 5
1967 Poitier, Sidney 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.39% 5
1967 Finch, Peter 56 56 56 1 1 5.08% x
1967 Harris, Richard 70 70 49 1 1 4.44% x
1967 Mason, James 35 35 35 1 0 3.17% x
1967 Welles, Orson 35 35 35 1 0 3.17% x
1967 Harrison, Rex 35 35 25 1 0 2.22% x
1967 Tognazzi, Ugo 35 35 25 1 0 2.22% x
1967 Bates, Alan 35 35 25 1 0 2.22% x
1968 Robertson, Cliff 70 35 56 161 151 3 2 16.54% 1
1968 Arkin, Alan 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 14.23% 2
1968 Moody, Ron 35 70 35 140 119 3 1 13.08% 3
1968 O’Toole, Peter 35 70 105 84 2 1 9.23% 4
1968 Oskarson, Per 63 63 63 1 1 7.56% 5
1968 Bates, Alan 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.54% 5
1968 Howard, Trevor 35 35 35 1 0 4.20% x
1968 Williamson, Nicol 35 35 35 1 0 4.20% x
1968 Astaire, Fred 35 35 25 1 0 2.94% x
1968 Lemmon, Jack 35 35 25 1 0 2.94% x
1968 Matthau, Walter 35 35 25 1 0 2.94% x
1968 Mostel, Zero 35 35 25 1 0 2.94% x
1968 Curtis, Tony 35 35 25 1 0 2.94% x
1969 Voight, Jon 35 35 133 203 193 4 2 19.78% 1
1969 Hoffman, Dustin 35 70 70 175 154 4 1 15.83% 2
1969 O’Toole, Peter 35 70 56 161 140 3 2 14.39% 3
1969 Wayne, John 70 70 140 119 2 2 12.23% 4
1969 Redford, Robert 70 70 70 1 1 7.19% 5
1969 Burton, Richard 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.12% x
1969 Bates, Alan 35 35 35 1 0 3.60% x
1969 Matthau, Walter 35 35 35 1 0 3.60% x
1969 Newman, Paul 35 35 35 1 0 3.60% x
1969 Williamson, Nicol 35 35 35 1 0 3.60% x
1969 Marvin, Lee 35 35 25 1 0 2.52% x
1969 McQueen, Steve 35 35 25 1 0 2.52% x
1969 Quinn, Anthony 35 35 25 1 0 2.52% x
1969 Arkin, Alan 35 35 25 1 0 2.52% x
1970 Scott, George C. 70 70 189 35 364 343 6 5 44.95% 1
1970 Douglas, Melvyn 35 35 70 60 2 0 7.80% 2
1970 Jones, James Earl 35 35 70 60 2 0 7.80% 2
1970 Nicholson, Jack 35 35 70 60 2 0 7.80% 2
1970 O’Neal, Ryan 35 35 70 60 2 0 7.80% 2
1970 Finney, Albert 70 70 49 1 1 6.42% x
1970 Hoffman, Dustin 35 35 35 1 0 4.59% x
1970 Benjamin, Richard 35 35 25 1 0 3.21% x
1970 Gould, Elliott 35 35 25 1 0 3.21% x
1970 Lemmon, Jack 35 35 25 1 0 3.21% x
1970 Sutherland, Donald 35 35 25 1 0 3.21% x
1971 Hackman, Gene 70 70 126 70 336 315 5 5 32.37% 1
1971 Finch, Peter 35 35 63 70 203 193 4 2 19.78% 2
1971 Scott, George C. 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 9.71% 3
1971 Topol 35 70 105 84 2 1 8.63% 4
1971 Matthau, Walter 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.12% 5
1971 Bogarde, Dirk 35 35 35 1 0 3.60% x
1971 Brando, Marlon 35 35 35 1 0 3.60% x
1971 Finney, Albert 35 35 35 1 0 3.60% x
1971 Cort, Bud 35 35 25 1 0 2.52% x
1971 Jones, Dean 35 35 25 1 0 2.52% x
1971 Wilder, Gene 35 35 25 1 0 2.52% x
1971 McDowell, Malcolm 35 35 25 1 0 2.52% x
1971 Nicholson, Jack 35 35 25 1 0 2.52% x
1972 Olivier, Laurence 35 35 70 35 175 165 4 1 19.11% 1
1972 Brando, Marlon 70 70 35 175 154 3 2 17.89% 2
1972 O’Toole, Peter 35 35 56 126 116 3 1 13.41% 3
1972 Matthau, Walter 35 70 105 95 2 1 10.98% 4
1972 Hackman, Gene 70 70 70 1 1 8.13% 5
1972 Caine, Michael 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.91% x
1972 Lemmon, Jack 70 70 49 1 1 5.69% x
1972 Winfield, Paul 35 35 35 1 0 4.07% x
1972 Scott, George C. 35 35 35 1 0 4.07% x
1972 Shaw, Robert 35 35 35 1 0 4.07% x
1972 Grodin, Charles 35 35 25 1 0 2.85% x
1972 Voight, Jon 35 35 25 1 0 2.85% x
1973 Brando, Marlon 35 133 35 203 203 4 2 19.73% 1
1973 Pacino, Al 35 70 56 35 196 175 4 2 17.01% 2
1973 Nicholson, Jack 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 12.59% 3
1973 Lemmon, Jack 70 35 105 95 2 1 9.18% 4
1973 Matthau, Walter 70 70 70 1 1 6.80% 5
1973 Sutherland, Donald 70 70 70 1 1 6.80% 5
1973 Ryan, Robert 56 56 56 1 1 5.44% x
1973 Segal, George 70 70 49 1 1 4.76% x
1973 Redford, Robert 35 35 35 1 0 3.40% x
1973 Anderson, Carl 35 35 25 1 0 2.38% x
1973 Dreyfuss, Richard 35 35 25 1 0 2.38% x
1973 Neeley, Ted 35 35 25 1 0 2.38% x
1973 O’Neal, Ryan 35 35 25 1 0 2.38% x
1973 Blake, Robert 35 35 25 1 0 2.38% x
1973 McQueen, Steve 35 35 25 1 0 2.38% x
1974 Nicholson, Jack 35 70 133 70 308 287 5 4 30.60% 1
1974 Pacino, Al 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 13.81% 2
1974 Carney, Art 70 70 140 119 2 2 12.69% 3
1974 Hackman, Gene 35 56 35 126 116 3 1 12.31% 4
1974 Hoffman, Dustin 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 10.07% 5
1974 Finney, Albert 35 35 70 70 2 0 7.46% x
1974 Jones, James Earl 35 35 25 1 0 2.61% x
1974 Lemmon, Jack 35 35 25 1 0 2.61% x
1974 Matthau, Walter 35 35 25 1 0 2.61% x
1974 Reynolds, Burt 35 35 25 1 0 2.61% x
1974 Caan, James 35 35 25 1 0 2.61% x
1975 Nicholson, Jack 70 70 189 70 399 378 6 6 38.41% 1
1975 Pacino, Al 35 35 70 70 210 200 4 2 20.27% 2
1975 Matthau, Walter 35 70 35 140 119 3 1 12.09% 3
1975 Schell, Maximilian 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.05% 5
1975 Whitmore, James 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.05% 5
1975 Hackman, Gene 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.05% 5
1975 Dreyfuss, Richard 35 35 35 1 0 3.56% x
1975 Beatty, Warren 35 35 25 1 0 2.49% x
1975 Caan, James 35 35 25 1 0 2.49% x
1975 Sellers, Peter 35 35 25 1 0 2.49% x
1976 De Niro, Robert 35 35 203 35 308 298 6 3 30.58% 1
1976 Finch, Peter 70 70 70 210 189 3 3 19.42% 2
1976 Stallone, Sylvester 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 9.71% 3
1976 Carradine, David 35 56 91 81 2 1 8.27% 4
1976 Holden, William 35 35 70 70 2 0 7.19% 5
1976 Hoffman, Dustin 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.12% x
1976 Kristofferson, Kris 70 70 49 1 1 5.04% x
1976 Giannini, Giancarlo 35 35 35 1 0 3.60% x
1976 Brooks, Mel 35 35 25 1 0 2.52% x
1976 Sellers, Peter 35 35 25 1 0 2.52% x
1976 Weston, Jack 35 35 25 1 0 2.52% x
1976 Wilder, Gene 35 35 25 1 0 2.52% x
1977 Dreyfuss, Richard 70 70 70 70 280 259 4 4 29.84% 1
1977 Travolta, John 35 35 56 126 116 3 1 13.31% 2
1977 Allen, Woody 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 10.89% 3
1977 Burton, Richard 35 70 105 84 2 1 9.68% 4
1977 Gielgud, John 70 70 70 1 1 8.06% 5
1977 Carney, Art 63 63 63 1 1 7.26% x
1977 Mastroianni, Marcello 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.85% x
1977 Brooks, Mel 35 35 25 1 0 2.82% x
1977 De Niro, Robert 35 35 25 1 0 2.82% x
1977 Winkler, Henry 35 35 25 1 0 2.82% x
1977 Pacino, Al 35 35 25 1 0 2.82% x
1977 Peck, Gregory 35 35 25 1 0 2.82% x
1978 Voight, Jon 70 70 196 336 315 5 5 32.01% 1
1978 Busey, Gary 35 35 63 133 123 3 1 12.45% 2
1978 De Niro, Robert 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 9.60% 3
1978 Olivier, Laurence 35 56 91 91 2 1 9.25% 4
1978 Beatty, Warren 35 70 105 84 2 1 8.54% 5
1978 Davis, Brad 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.05% x
1978 Hopkins, Anthony 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.05% x
1978 Ustinov, Peter 35 35 35 1 0 3.56% x
1978 Alda, Alan 35 35 25 1 0 2.49% x
1978 Peck, Gregory 35 35 25 1 0 2.49% x
1978 Chase, Chevy 35 35 25 1 0 2.49% x
1978 Scott, George C. 35 35 25 1 0 2.49% x
1978 Travolta, John 35 35 25 1 0 2.49% x
1979 Hoffman, Dustin 70 70 203 35 378 357 6 5 38.06% 1
1979 Sellers, Peter 35 70 56 35 196 175 4 2 18.66% 2
1979 Scheider, Roy 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 10.07% 3
1979 Lemmon, Jack 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.34% 4
1979 Pacino, Al 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.34% 4
1979 Allen, Woody 35 35 35 1 0 3.73% x
1979 Sheen, Martin 35 35 35 1 0 3.73% x
1979 Voight, Jon 35 35 25 1 0 2.61% x
1979 Hamilton, George 35 35 25 1 0 2.61% x
1979 Moore, Dudley 35 35 25 1 0 2.61% x
1979 Reynolds, Burt 35 35 25 1 0 2.61% x
1979 Woods, James 35 35 25 1 0 2.61% x
1980 De Niro, Robert 70 70 259 35 434 413 7 6 44.36% 1
1980 Hurt, John 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 13.91% 2
1980 O’Toole, Peter 35 35 63 133 123 3 1 13.16% 3
1980 Lemmon, Jack 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.39% 4
1980 Sharkey, Ray 70 70 49 1 1 5.26% 5
1980 Duvall, Robert 35 35 35 1 0 3.76% x
1980 Jones, Tommy Lee 35 35 25 1 0 2.63% x
1980 Le Mat, Paul 35 35 25 1 0 2.63% x
1980 Matthau, Walter 35 35 25 1 0 2.63% x
1980 Diamond, Neil 35 35 25 1 0 2.63% x
1980 Sutherland, Donald 35 35 25 1 0 2.63% x
1981 Lancaster, Burt 35 35 266 70 406 396 7 5 39.51% 1
1981 Fonda, Henry 70 70 56 35 231 210 4 3 20.98% 2
1981 Beatty, Warren 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 9.44% 3
1981 Moore, Dudley 35 70 105 84 2 1 8.39% 4
1981 Newman, Paul 35 35 35 1 0 3.50% 5
1981 Irons, Jeremy 35 35 35 1 0 3.50% 5
1981 Alda, Alan 35 35 25 1 0 2.45% x
1981 Hutton, Timothy 35 35 25 1 0 2.45% x
1981 Williams, Treat 35 35 25 1 0 2.45% x
1981 Hamilton, George 35 35 25 1 0 2.45% x
1981 Martin, Steve 35 35 25 1 0 2.45% x
1981 Matthau, Walter 35 35 25 1 0 2.45% x
1982 Kingsley, Ben 70 70 196 70 406 385 6 6 36.77% 1
1982 Hoffman, Dustin 35 70 126 70 301 280 5 4 26.74% 2
1982 Lemmon, Jack 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 9.03% 3
1982 Newman, Paul 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.68% 4
1982 Finney, Albert 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.68% 4
1982 O’Toole, Peter 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.68% x
1982 Hoskins, Bob 35 35 35 1 0 3.34% x
1982 Pacino, Al 35 35 25 1 0 2.34% x
1982 Winkler, Henry 35 35 25 1 0 2.34% x
1982 Gere, Richard 35 35 25 1 0 2.34% x
1983 Duvall, Robert 70 70 140 280 259 4 4 23.87% 1
1983 Caine, Michael 35 70 105 210 189 4 2 17.42% 2
1983 Conti, Tom 35 35 56 126 116 3 1 10.65% 3
1983 Courtenay, Tom 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 8.71% 4
1983 Finney, Albert 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 8.71% 4
1983 Roberts, Eric 35 63 98 88 2 1 8.06% x
1983 Depardieu, Gerard 63 63 63 1 1 5.81% x
1983 De Niro, Robert 35 35 35 1 0 3.23% x
1983 Allen, Woody 35 35 25 1 0 2.26% x
1983 Cruise, Tom 35 35 25 1 0 2.26% x
1983 Murphy, Eddie 35 35 25 1 0 2.26% x
1983 Patinken, Mandy 35 35 25 1 0 2.26% x
1983 Farnsworth, Richard 35 35 25 1 0 2.26% x
1983 Pacino, Al 35 35 25 1 0 2.26% x
1984 Abraham, F. Murray 70 70 70 35 245 224 4 3 22.38% 1
1984 Martin, Steve 35 133 168 158 3 2 15.73% 2
1984 Waterston, Sam 35 35 63 35 168 158 4 1 15.73% 2
1984 Finney, Albert 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 12.94% 4
1984 Banerjee, Victor 56 35 91 91 2 1 9.09% 5
1984 Bridges, Jeff 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.94% x
1984 Hulce, Tom 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.94% x
1984 Moore, Dudley 70 70 49 1 1 4.90% x
1984 Murphy, Eddie 35 35 25 1 0 2.45% x
1984 Murray, Bill 35 35 25 1 0 2.45% x
1984 Williams, Robin 35 35 25 1 0 2.45% x
1985 Hurt, William 70 35 126 70 301 291 5 4 29.43% 1
1985 Nicholson, Jack 35 70 196 301 280 5 4 28.37% 2
1985 Ford, Harrison 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 9.57% 3
1985 Voight, Jon 35 70 105 84 2 1 8.51% 4
1985 Julia, Raul 35 56 91 81 2 1 8.16% 5
1985 Garner, James 35 35 70 60 2 0 6.03% x
1985 Dunne, Griffin 35 35 25 1 0 2.48% x
1985 Fox, Michael J 35 35 25 1 0 2.48% x
1985 Daniels, Jeff 35 35 25 1 0 2.48% x
1985 Hackman, Gene 35 35 25 1 0 2.48% x
1986 Hoskins, Bob 35 70 266 70 441 420 7 6 37.50% 1
1986 Newman, Paul 70 35 56 161 151 3 2 13.44% 2
1986 Hogan, Paul 70 35 105 84 2 1 7.50% 3
1986 Connery, Sean 70 70 70 1 1 6.25% 4
1986 Gordon, Dexter 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.31% 5
1986 Hurt, William 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.31% 5
1986 McAnally, Ray 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.31% x
1986 Woods, James 35 35 35 1 0 3.13% x
1986 Allen, Woody 35 35 35 1 0 3.13% x
1986 Ford, Harrison 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1986 Broderick, Matthew 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1986 Daniels, Jeff 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1986 De Vito, Danny 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1986 Lemmon, Jack 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1986 Irons, Jeremy 35 35 25 1 0 2.19% x
1987 Douglas, Michael 70 70 56 35 231 210 4 3 19.61% 1
1987 Nicholson, Jack 35 35 140 210 200 4 2 18.63% 2
1987 Martin, Steve 35 133 168 158 3 2 14.71% 3
1987 Hurt, William 35 35 63 133 123 3 1 11.44% 4
1987 Williams, Robin 35 70 35 140 119 3 1 11.11% 5
1987 Depardieu, Gerard 35 35 35 1 0 3.27% x
1987 Montand, Yves 35 35 35 1 0 3.27% x
1987 Oldman, Gary 35 35 35 1 0 3.27% x
1987 Mastroianni, Marcello 35 35 35 1 0 3.27% x
1987 Cage, Nicholas 35 35 25 1 0 2.29% x
1987 De Vito, Danny 35 35 25 1 0 2.29% x
1987 Swayze, Patrick 35 35 25 1 0 2.29% x
1987 Lone, John 35 35 25 1 0 2.29% x
1987 Nolte, Nick 35 35 25 1 0 2.29% x
1988 Hanks, Tom 35 70 70 175 154 3 2 15.49% 1
1988 Hoffman, Dustin 70 70 35 175 154 3 2 15.49% 1
1988 Irons, Jeremy 133 133 133 2 2 13.38% 3
1988 Hackman, Gene 35 35 56 126 116 3 1 11.62% 4
1988 Cleese, John 35 70 105 95 2 1 9.51% 5
1988 Keaton, Michael 63 63 63 1 1 6.34% x
1988 Day-Lewis, Daniel 63 63 63 1 1 6.34% x
1988 Olmos, Edward James 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.99% x
1988 von Sydow, Max 35 35 35 1 0 3.52% x
1988 Caine, Michael 35 35 25 1 0 2.46% x
1988 De Niro, Robert 35 35 25 1 0 2.46% x
1988 Hoskins, Bob 35 35 25 1 0 2.46% x
1988 Hulce, Tom 35 35 25 1 0 2.46% x
1988 Whitaker, Forest 35 35 25 1 0 2.46% x
1989 Day-Lewis, Daniel 70 35 266 70 441 431 7 6 39.35% 1
1989 Cruise, Tom 35 70 63 35 203 182 4 2 16.64% 2
1989 Freeman, Morgan 35 70 56 161 140 3 2 12.80% 3
1989 Williams, Robin 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 8.64% 4
1989 Branagh, Kenneth 35 35 70 70 2 0 6.40% 5
1989 Nicholson, Jack 35 30 65 55 2 0 4.98% x
1989 Crystal, Billy 35 35 25 1 0 2.24% x
1989 Douglas, Michael 35 35 25 1 0 2.24% x
1989 Martin, Steve 35 35 25 1 0 2.24% x
1989 Lemmon, Jack 35 35 25 1 0 2.24% x
1989 Pacino, Al 35 35 25 1 0 2.24% x
1990 Irons, Jeremy 70 70 259 399 378 6 6 32.73% 1
1990 De Niro, Robert 35 126 35 196 196 4 2 16.97% 2
1990 Depardieu, Gerard 35 70 35 140 119 3 1 10.30% 3
1990 Costner, Kevin 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 8.18% 4
1990 Williams, Robin 35 56 91 81 2 1 6.97% 5
1990 Noiret, Philippe 70 70 70 1 1 6.06% x
1990 Harris, Richard 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.15% x
1990 Connery, Sean 35 35 35 1 0 3.03% x
1990 Culkin, Macauley 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1990 Depp, Johnny 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1990 Gere, Richard 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1990 Pacino, Al 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1990 Swayze, Patrick 35 35 25 1 0 2.12% x
1991 Hopkins, Anthony 70 35 235 70 410 400 7 6 36.45% 1
1991 Nolte, Nick 35 70 133 238 217 4 3 19.80% 2
1991 Beatty, Warren 35 35 56 126 116 3 1 10.54% 3
1991 Williams, Robin 35 70 105 84 2 1 7.66% 4
1991 Phoenix, River 63 63 63 1 1 5.75% 5
1991 De Niro, Robert 35 35 70 60 2 0 5.43% x
1991 Rickman, Alan 35 35 35 1 0 3.19% x
1991 Bridges, Jeff 35 35 25 1 0 2.24% x
1991 Crystal, Billy 35 35 25 1 0 2.24% x
1991 Hoffman, Dustin 35 35 25 1 0 2.24% x
1991 Kline, Kevin 35 35 25 1 0 2.24% x
1991 Costner, Kevin 35 35 25 1 0 2.24% x
1992 Washington, Denzel 35 35 196 266 256 5 3 24.01% 1
1992 Rea, Stephen 35 63 35 133 133 3 1 12.50% 2
1992 Downey Jr., Robert 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 12.17% 3
1992 Pacino, Al 70 70 140 119 2 2 11.18% 4
1992 Robbins, Tim 105 35 140 109 3 1 10.20% 5
1992 Eastwood, Clint 35 70 105 105 2 1 9.87% x
1992 Lemmon, Jack 56 56 56 1 1 5.26% x
1992 Day-Lewis, Daniel 35 35 35 1 0 3.29% x
1992 Cage, Nicholas 35 35 25 1 0 2.30% x
1992 Crystal, Billy 35 35 25 1 0 2.30% x
1992 Mastroianni, Marcello 35 35 25 1 0 2.30% x
1992 Cruise, Tom 35 35 25 1 0 2.30% x
1992 Nicholson, Jack 35 35 25 1 0 2.30% x
1993 Hopkins, Anthony 35 35 126 105 301 291 6 3 27.30% 1
1993 Day-Lewis, Daniel 35 35 63 35 168 158 4 1 14.80% 2
1993 Neeson, Liam 35 35 63 35 168 158 4 1 14.80% 2
1993 Hanks, Tom 70 105 175 144 3 2 13.49% 4
1993 Thewliss, David 133 133 133 2 2 12.50% 5
1993 Williams, Robin 70 70 49 1 1 4.61% x
1993 Fishburne, Laurence 35 35 35 1 0 3.29% x
1993 Depp, Johnny 35 35 25 1 0 2.30% x
1993 Kline, Kevin 35 35 25 1 0 2.30% x
1993 Meaney, Colm 35 35 25 1 0 2.30% x
1993 Ford, Harrison 35 35 25 1 0 2.30% x
1994 Hanks, Tom 70 70 119 35 70 364 343 6 5 25.52% 1
1994 Newman, Paul 35 35 133 35 238 228 5 2 16.93% 2
1994 Travolta, John 35 35 70 35 35 210 200 5 1 14.84% 3
1994 Grant, Hugh 70 70 140 119 2 2 8.85% 4
1994 Hawthorne, Nigel 35 70 105 105 2 1 7.81% 5
1994 Freeman, Morgan 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 7.03% x
1994 Finney, Albert 63 63 63 1 1 4.69% x
1994 Stamp, Terence 35 35 70 60 2 0 4.43% x
1994 Robbins, Tim 35 35 35 1 0 2.60% x
1994 Carrey, Jim 35 35 25 1 0 1.82% x
1994 Depp, Johnny 35 35 25 1 0 1.82% x
1994 Schwarzennegar, Arnold 35 35 25 1 0 1.82% x
1994 Pitt, Brad 35 35 25 1 0 1.82% x
1995 Cage, Nicholas 70 70 385 35 70 630 609 10 9 45.96% 1
1995 Troisi, Massimi 35 35 35 105 105 3 0 7.92% 2
1995 Hopkins, Anthony 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 7.13% 3
1995 Penn, Sean 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 7.13% 3
1995 Bacon, Kevin 30 70 100 86 2 1 6.49% 5
1995 Dreyfuss, Richard 35 35 70 60 2 0 4.49% x
1995 McKellen, Ian 35 35 70 60 2 0 4.49% x
1995 Travolta, John 70 70 49 1 1 3.70% x
1995 Pryce, Jonathan 35 35 35 1 0 2.64% x
1995 Jones, James Earl 35 35 35 1 0 2.64% x
1995 Swayze, Patrick 35 35 25 1 0 1.85% x
1995 Douglas, Michael 35 35 25 1 0 1.85% x
1995 Ford, Harrison 35 35 25 1 0 1.85% x
1995 Martin, Steve 35 35 25 1 0 1.85% x
1996 Rush, Geoffrey 70 70 203 70 70 70 553 518 8 8 39.09% 1
1996 Cruise, Tom 35 70 56 35 196 175 4 2 13.21% 2
1996 Thornton, Billy Bob 35 63 35 133 133 3 1 10.04% 3
1996 Fiennes, Ralph 35 35 35 35 140 130 4 0 9.77% 4
1996 Harrelson, Woody 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 7.13% 5
1996 Murphy, Eddie 35 63 98 88 2 1 6.60% x
1996 Lane, Nathan 35 30 65 55 2 0 4.11% x
1996 Spall, Timothy 35 35 35 1 0 2.64% x
1996 Banderas, Antonio 35 35 25 1 0 1.85% x
1996 Costner, Kevin 35 35 25 1 0 1.85% x
1996 Gibson, Mel 35 35 25 1 0 1.85% x
1996 Neeson, Liam 35 35 25 1 0 1.85% x
1997 Nicholson, Jack 70 70 56 70 70 336 301 5 5 23.89% 1
1997 Duvall, Robert 35 196 35 266 266 5 3 21.11% 2
1997 Fonda, Peter 35 70 70 35 210 189 4 2 15.00% 3
1997 Hoffman, Dustin 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 7.50% 4
1997 Damon, Matt 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 7.50% 4
1997 Carlyle, Robert 70 70 70 1 1 5.56% x
1997 Pacino, Al 63 63 63 1 1 5.00% x
1997 Winstone, Ray 35 35 35 1 0 2.78% x
1997 Day-Lewis, Daniel 35 35 25 1 0 1.94% x
1997 Carrey, Jim 35 35 25 1 0 1.94% x
1997 Jackson, Samuel L. 35 35 25 1 0 1.94% x
1997 Kline, Kevin 35 35 25 1 0 1.94% x
1997 DiCaprio, Leonardo 35 35 25 1 0 1.94% x
1997 Honsou, Djimon 35 35 25 1 0 1.94% x
1998 McKellen, Ian 35 35 189 35 70 364 340 7 4 25.53% 1
1998 Nolte, Nick 35 35 133 35 238 228 5 2 17.11% 2
1998 Benigni, Roberto 70 70 70 210 210 3 3 15.79% 3
1998 Hanks, Tom 35 35 35 35 140 130 4 0 9.74% 4
1998 Caine, Michael 70 35 105 84 2 1 6.32% 5
1998 Fiennes, Joseph 35 35 70 70 2 0 5.26% x
1998 Gleeson, Brendan 63 63 63 1 1 4.74% x
1998 Carrey, Jim 70 70 49 1 1 3.68% x
1998 Norton, Edward 35 35 35 1 0 2.63% x
1998 Banderas, Antonio 35 35 25 1 0 1.84% x
1998 Beatty, Warren 35 35 25 1 0 1.84% x
1998 Travolta, John 35 35 25 1 0 1.84% x
1998 Williams, Robin 35 35 25 1 0 1.84% x
1998 Fry, Stephen 35 35 25 1 0 1.84% x
1999 Crowe, Russell 35 35 189 35 35 70 399 375 8 4 27.44% 1
1999 Spacey, Kevin 70 35 63 70 70 308 298 5 4 21.79% 2
1999 Carrey, Jim 70 63 35 168 147 3 2 10.77% 3
1999 Farnsworth, Richard 35 35 70 140 130 3 1 9.49% 4
1999 Washington, Denzel 35 70 35 140 119 3 1 8.72% 5
1999 Penn, Sean 35 35 70 60 2 0 4.36% x
1999 Broadbent, Jim 35 35 35 1 0 2.56% x
1999 Fiennes, Ralph 35 35 35 1 0 2.56% x
1999 Puri, Om 35 35 35 1 0 2.56% x
1999 Hoffman, Philip Seymour 35 35 35 1 0 2.56% x
1999 De Niro, Robert 35 35 25 1 0 1.79% x
1999 Everett, Rupert 35 35 25 1 0 1.79% x
1999 Grant, Hugh 35 35 25 1 0 1.79% x
1999 Damon, Matt 35 35 25 1 0 1.79% x
2000 Hanks, Tom 35 70 133 35 35 308 287 6 3 22.16% 1
2000 Crowe, Russell 70 35 35 35 70 245 221 5 2 17.03% 2
2000 Bardem, Javier 35 35 119 189 179 4 2 13.78% 3
2000 Douglas, Michael 35 70 35 140 130 3 1 10.00% 4
2000 Rush, Geoffrey 35 35 35 35 140 130 4 0 10.00% 4
2000 Bell, Jamie 70 35 105 105 2 1 8.11% x
2000 Farrell, Colin 63 63 63 1 1 4.86% x
2000 Clooney, George 70 70 49 1 1 3.78% x
2000 Harris, Ed 35 35 35 1 0 2.70% x
2000 Carrey, Jim 35 35 25 1 0 1.89% x
2000 Cusack, John 35 35 25 1 0 1.89% x
2000 De Niro, Robert 35 35 25 1 0 1.89% x
2000 Gibson, Mel 35 35 25 1 0 1.89% x
2001 Crowe, Russell 35 70 70 70 70 315 280 5 4 19.80% 1
2001 Washington, Denzel 70 35 133 35 273 263 5 3 18.56% 2
2001 Hackman, Gene 70 126 196 175 3 3 12.38% 3
2001 Wilkinson, Tom 35 70 35 35 175 175 4 1 12.38% 3
2001 Thornton, Billy Bob 70 56 126 105 3 1 7.43% 5
2001 Penn, Sean 35 35 35 105 98 3 0 6.93% x
2001 Smith, Will 35 35 35 105 88 3 0 6.19% x
2001 Cox, Brian 63 63 63 1 1 4.46% x
2001 Spacey, Kevin 35 35 70 60 2 0 4.21% x
2001 Kline, Kevin 35 35 35 1 0 2.48% x
2001 Jackman, Hugh 35 35 25 1 0 1.73% x
2001 McGregor, Ewan 35 35 25 1 0 1.73% x
2001 Mitchell, John Cameron 35 35 25 1 0 1.73% x
2002 Day-Lewis, Daniel 35 35 203 70 70 70 483 459 8 6 30.18% 1
2002 Brody, Adrian 70 35 126 35 35 301 291 6 3 19.12% 2
2002 Nicholson, Jack 35 70 70 35 35 70 315 280 6 3 18.43% 3
2002 Cage, Nicholas 35 35 35 35 140 130 4 0 8.53% 4
2002 Caine, Michael 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 6.22% 5
2002 Gere, Richard 70 35 105 84 2 1 5.53% x
2002 Scott, Campbell 56 56 56 1 1 3.69% x
2002 Williams, Robin 35 35 28 1 0 1.84% x
2002 Culkin, Kieran 35 35 25 1 0 1.61% x
2002 Grant, Hugh 35 35 25 1 0 1.61% x
2002 Sandler, Adam 35 35 25 1 0 1.61% x
2002 DiCaprio, Leonardo 35 35 25 1 0 1.61% x
2003 Murray, Bill 35 70 329 70 35 35 574 546 10 7 36.97% 1
2003 Penn, Sean 70 70 56 70 35 70 371 336 6 5 22.75% 2
2003 Depp, Johnny 35 35 35 70 35 210 193 5 1 13.03% 3
2003 Kingsley, Ben 35 35 35 35 140 123 4 0 8.29% 4
2003 Law, Jude 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 6.40% 5
2003 Crowe, Russell 35 35 70 53 2 0 3.55% x
2003 Dinklage, Peter 35 35 35 1 0 2.37% x
2003 Black, Jack 35 35 25 1 0 1.66% x
2003 Nicholson, Jack 35 35 25 1 0 1.66% x
2003 Thornton, Billy Bob 35 35 25 1 0 1.66% x
2003 Cruise, Tom 35 35 25 1 0 1.66% x
2004 Foxx, Jamie 70 70 182 70 70 70 532 497 8 8 33.02% 1
2004 Giamatti, Paul 35 133 35 35 238 221 5 2 14.65% 2
2004 DiCaprio, Leonardo 35 70 35 35 35 210 182 5 1 12.09% 3
2004 Depp, Johnny 35 35 35 35 35 175 158 5 0 10.47% 4
2004 Cheadle, Don 35 35 35 35 140 123 4 0 8.14% 5
2004 Neeson, Liam 35 70 105 95 2 1 6.28% x
2004 Carrey, Jim 35 35 70 60 2 0 3.95% x
2004 Bardem, Javier 35 35 70 53 2 0 3.49% x
2004 Eastwood, Clint 35 35 35 1 0 2.33% x
2004 Garcia Bernal, Gael 35 35 35 1 0 2.33% x
2004 Kline, Kevin 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2004 Spacey, Kevin 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2005 Hoffman, Philip Seymour 70 70 315 70 70 70 665 630 10 10 41.18% 1
2005 Ledger, Heath 35 35 70 35 35 35 245 228 6 1 14.87% 2
2005 Phoenix, Joaquin 35 70 35 35 35 210 182 5 1 11.90% 3
2005 Straithairn, David 35 35 35 35 35 175 158 5 0 10.29% 4
2005 Howard, Terrence 35 35 35 105 88 3 0 5.72% 5
2005 Crowe, Russell 35 35 35 105 88 3 0 5.72% 5
2005 Fiennes, Ralph 35 35 35 1 0 2.29% x
2005 Brosnan, Pierce 35 35 25 1 0 1.60% x
2005 Daniels, Jeff 35 35 25 1 0 1.60% x
2005 Depp, Johnny 35 35 25 1 0 1.60% x
2005 Lane, Nathan 35 35 25 1 0 1.60% x
2005 Murphy, Cilian 35 35 25 1 0 1.60% x
2006 Whitaker, Forest 70 70 385 70 70 70 735 700 11 11 43.61% 1
2006 DiCaprio, Leonardo 35 70 35 65 70 275 240 6 2 14.95% 2
2006 O’Toole, Peter 35 35 35 35 35 175 158 5 0 9.81% 3
2006 Smith, Will 35 35 35 35 140 123 4 0 7.63% 4
2006 Cohen, Sacha Baron 70 70 140 119 2 2 7.41% 5
2006 Gosling, Ryan 35 35 35 105 98 3 0 6.11% x
2006 Griffiths, Richard 35 35 35 1 0 2.18% x
2006 Craig, Daniel 35 35 35 1 0 2.18% x
2006 Depp, Johnny 35 35 25 1 0 1.53% x
2006 Eckhart, Aaron 35 35 25 1 0 1.53% x
2006 Ejiofor, Chiwetel 35 35 25 1 0 1.53% x
2006 Ferrell, Will 35 35 25 1 0 1.53% x
2007 Day-Lewis, Daniel 70 70 266 70 70 70 616 581 9 9 38.60% 1
2007 Clooney, George 35 35 56 35 35 35 231 214 6 1 14.19% 2
2007 Mortenson, Viggo 35 35 35 35 35 175 158 5 0 10.47% 3
2007 Depp, Johnny 35 70 35 140 112 3 1 7.44% 4
2007 Gosling, Ryan 35 35 35 105 88 3 0 5.81% 5
2007 Langella, Frank 63 63 63 1 1 4.19% x
2007 Hirsch, Emile 35 35 70 63 2 0 4.19% x
2007 McAvoy, James 35 35 70 60 2 0 3.95% x
2007 Jones, Tommy Lee 35 35 35 1 0 2.33% x
2007 Muhe, Ulrich 35 35 35 1 0 2.33% x
2007 Hanks, Tom 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2007 Hoffman, Philip Seymour 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2007 Reilly, John C. 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2007 Washington, Denzel 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2008 Penn, Sean 70 35 266 35 70 70 546 522 9 7 32.03% 1
2008 Rourke, Mickey 35 70 126 70 35 35 371 343 7 4 21.07% 2
2008 Langella, Frank 35 35 35 35 35 175 158 5 0 9.67% 3
2008 Pitt, Brad 35 35 35 35 35 175 158 5 0 9.67% 3
2008 Jenkins, Richard 35 35 35 105 98 3 0 6.02% 5
2008 Eastwood, Clint 56 35 91 84 2 1 5.16% x
2008 Patel, Dev 35 30 65 65 2 0 3.99% x
2008 Gleeson, Brendan 35 30 65 55 2 0 3.35% x
2008 Farrell, Colin 70 70 49 1 1 3.01% x
2008 Bardem, Javier 35 35 25 1 0 1.50% x
2008 Franco, James 35 35 25 1 0 1.50% x
2008 Hoffman, Dustin 35 35 25 1 0 1.50% x
2008 DiCaprio, Leonardo 35 35 25 1 0 1.50% x
2009 Bridges, Jeff 70 70 70 35 70 70 385 350 6 5 22.42% 1
2009 Renner, Jeremy 35 189 35 35 35 329 322 7 3 20.63% 2
2009 Clooney, George 35 35 126 35 35 35 301 284 7 2 18.16% 3
2009 Firth, Colin 35 35 70 35 35 210 193 5 1 12.33% 4
2009 Freeman, Morgan 35 35 56 35 35 196 179 5 1 11.43% 5
2009 Downey, Robert 70 70 49 1 1 3.14% x
2009 Serkis, Andy 35 35 35 1 0 2.24% x
2009 Mortenson, Viggo 35 35 28 1 0 1.79% x
2009 Damon, Matt 35 35 25 1 0 1.57% x
2009 Day-Lewis, Daniel 35 35 25 1 0 1.57% x
2009 Gordon-Leavitt, Joseph 35 35 25 1 0 1.57% x
2009 Stahlberg, Michael 35 35 25 1 0 1.57% x
2009 Maguire, Tobey 35 35 25 1 0 1.57% x
2010 Firth, Colin 70 70 203 70 70 70 553 518 8 8 34.42% 1
2010 Eisenberg, Jesse 35 35 182 35 35 35 357 340 8 3 22.56% 2
2010 Franco, James 35 35 35 35 35 175 158 5 0 10.47% 3
2010 Bridges, Jeff 35 35 35 35 140 133 4 0 8.84% 4
2010 Bardem, Javier 35 35 70 70 2 0 4.65% 5
2010 Duvall, Robert 35 35 70 63 2 0 4.19% x
2010 Gosling, Ryan 35 35 70 53 2 0 3.49% x
2010 Depp, Johnny 70 70 49 2 0 3.26% x
2010 Giamatti, Paul 70 70 49 1 1 3.26% x
2010 Gyllenhall, Jake 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2010 Spacey, Kevin 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2010 Wahlberg, Mark 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2011 Pitt, Brad 35 35 196 35 35 35 371 354 8 3 23.49% 1
2011 Dujardin, Jean 70 70 70 70 35 315 287 5 4 19.07% 2
2011 Clooney, George 35 70 56 35 35 70 301 266 6 3 17.67% 3
2011 Fassbender, Michael 35 70 35 35 175 158 4 1 10.47% 4
2011 DiCaprio, Leonardo 35 35 35 105 88 3 0 5.81% 5
2011 Gosling, Ryan 70 35 105 77 3 0 5.12% x
2011 Oldman, Gary 35 35 70 70 2 0 4.65% x
2011 Bichir, Demian 35 35 70 70 2 0 4.65% x
2011 Shannon, Michael 63 63 63 1 1 4.19% x
2011 Gleeson, Brendan 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2011 Gordon-Leavitt, Joseph 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2011 Wilson, Owen 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x

Lists

  • Best Oscar Winner Snubbed by the BAFTAs:  Jeremy Irons  (Reversal of Fortune)
  • Best Oscar Nominee Snubbed by the BAFTAs:  Peter O’Toole  (The Lion in Winter)
  • Best BAFTA Winner Snubbed by the Oscars:  Henry Fonda  (12 Angry Men)
  • Best BAFTA Nominee Snubbed by the Oscars:  Takashi Shimura  (Ikiru)
  • Best Performance Snubbed by both the Oscars and BAFTAs:  Orson Welles  (Touch of Evil)
  • Best Performance Snubbed by the Oscars and BAFTAs but Nominated by the BFCA:  Paul Giamatti  (Sideways)
  • Best Performance Snubbed by the Oscars and BAFTAs but Nominated by SAG:  Tim Robbins  (The Shawshank Redemption)
  • Average Nighthawk Winner  (9 point scale):  8.32
  • Average Oscar Winner  (9 point scale):  6.44
  • Average BAFTA Winner  (9 point scale):  6.00
  • Average Globe – Drama Winner  (9 point scale):  6.77
  • Average Globe – Comedy Winner  (9 point scale):  4.56
  • Average SAG Winner  (9 point scale):  7.28
  • Average BFCA Winner  (9 point scale):  7.06
  • Average Nighthawk 2nd Place  (9 point scale):  7.48
  • Average Nighthawk Nominee  (9 point scale):  7.01
  • Average Oscar Nominee  (9 point scale):  5.80
  • Average BAFTA Nominee  (9 point scale):  4.55
  • Average Globe – Drama Nominee  (9 point scale):  5.36
  • Average Globe – Comedy Nominee (9 point scale):  2.90
  • Average SAG Nominee  (9 point scale):  6.26
  • Average BFCA Nominee  (9 point scale):  6.17
  • Average Oscar Score:  84.10
  • Average Oscar Winner Rank:  4.94
  • Average Oscar Winner Rank Among Nominees:  2.46

See Them Only for the Actor Performance

(The Awards Groups)

There are two films that fit here.  In both cases, they were nominated by the Oscars, BAFTAs and Globes for this and nothing else but in all three cases received no other nominations which is insane because they are fantastic films: The Pawnbroker (Rod Steiger) and The Quiet American (Michael Caine).

See Them Only for the Actor Performance

(The Nighthawks)

Of the 16,000+ films I have seen through 2011, there are 123 that only earn points from me for Actor (far fewer than Actress).  Of those, 102 are *** (you can’t earn just Actor and be better than *** because all films better than *** earn points for Picture).  Of the other 21, the ones that are **.5 or lower, only two of them earn a 4 or higher which means I think they’re good enough to be an Oscar nominee.  Those two performances are Richard Dreyfuss in Mr. Holland’s Opus (which was an Oscar nominee) and Brian Cox in L.I.E..  The single best performance from a film with no other points is Edward Norton in American History X which is a mid ***.


Since 2011

All-Time Notes:  Daniel Day-Lewis (Lincoln) is now the top performance of the decade.  Lin-Manuel Miranda (Mary Poppins Returns) now tops a very weak Kids field while Matt Damon (The Martian) is the top performance in Sci-Fi.

9 Point Performances Since 2011:

  • Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln, 2012
  • Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant, 2015
  • Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour, 2017

Oscar Notes:  Daniel Day-Lewis is now tied for 4th in points with 315 after becoming the first person to win three Best Actor Oscars and Denzel Washington is part of the group at the bottom with 245 points.  Ethan Hawke (First Reformed) is now #2 for Most Critical Acclaim without an Oscar Nom.  In 2013, we had another winner who was the weakest of the nominees (Matthew McConaughy).  The Oscar Score for the decade now stands at 96.1 including 2018 and no year has been below a 91.  Matthew McConaughey became the latest Oscar winner to be the weakest of the nominees.

BAFTA Notes:  Daniel Day-Lewis is now in 2nd place in points with 385.  The Revenant became the first Adventure to win the BAFTA while The Martian became the first Sci-Fi to earn a nomination.  In 2015, for the first time since 2002, a film was nominated for Actor and nothing else (Trumbo) and then it happened again the next year (Captain Fantastic).  Several years (2013, 2014, 2018) rank above 2011 on the “five nominee” ranking.

Golden Globes:  Daniel Day-Lewis, Tom Hanks and Denzel are all now tied for 4th place in Drama with 315 points.  Day-Lewis is tied for 10th in overall points with 350 while Leo is up to 420 total points and is in 6th place.  The 2017 Drama class (Oldman, Hanks, Chalemet, Day-Lewis, Denzel) is tied for 2nd but the 2013 Comedy class is far and away the best group for Comedy and even ties for 1st overall with the top Drama year (it’s DiCaprio, Bale, Dern, Isaac, Phoenix) and they all happen to be from Picture nominees.  The Big Short became the eighth film to earn two Comedy noms without a win but in this case one of them went on to an Oscar nom but in supporting.  Darkest Hour became the first Drama winner in a decade to have no other nominations.  The Globes had another year (2017) where neither Picture winner earned an Actor nom.

BFCA Notes:  The Top 5 at the BFCA is now Crowe, Day-Lewis (245), DiCaprio (210), Gosling (210) and Penn.  Ryan Gosling (First Man) is now easily the Best Performance Only Nominated by the BFCA.

SAG Notes:  The Top 5 is now Daniel Day-Lewis (210), Denzel (210), Crowe, Penn, Hanks and Leo (175).  Denzel (2016) is now the Lowest Acclaim for a Winner while Casey Affleck in the same year is the Highest Acclaim for a Nominee.

Critics Awards Notes:  Gary Oldman (2017) is now the Most Acclaimed Performance to Not Win a Critics Award with Rami Malek (2018) in 4th and Eddie Redmayne (2014) in 5th.  Michael Keaton (2015) is now the Least Acclaimed to win the NYFC, Tom Hardy (2014) and Adam Driver (2016) are Least Acclaimed for LAFC and Michael B. Jordan (2015) for the NSFC.  After their snub of Jack Nicholson in their initial awards in 1975, the LAFC gave their award to every major winner (30% or higher of Consensus) – all 17 of them – but in 2012, they passed over Daniel Day-Lewis (35.68%) and then in 2016 they passed over Casey Affleck (39.25%).  In 2014, Timothy Spall became the third Actor to win multiple Critics awards (NYFC, NSFC) and not earn any other Consensus points.

Nighthawk Notes:  Daniel Day-Lewis is now #1 in Nighthawk points with ease (and with 490 points).  Leo has entered the Top 10 with 315 points.  No changes in Drama except that DDL now has a much bigger lead (560 total points).  Bill Murray is now up to 315 Comedy points.  In weighted points, if DDL really has retired, he goes out in 2nd place (barely) with 607 points.  Leo is now in 10th place with 448 points but depending on Once Upon a Time in Hollywood he could end the year as high as 6th.  The Top 10 for Absolute Points is now Jack, Newman, DDL (835), Tom Hanks (722), Jimmy Stewart, Olivier, Leo (688), Hoffman, Fonda and De Niro.  Scorsese scores another win (Leo – Wolf of Wall Street) and another nom (The Silence) so he now dominates as a director in this category.  Wolf of Wall Street lands in the Top 10 performances directed by Marty.  Denzel lands (easily) in the Top 20 for Best Self-Directed Performances for FencesThe Martian is the third Sci-Fi film with a nom while Birdman is the first Fantasy to win.  The 2013 Comedy class is easily the best year for Comedy (DiCaprio, Bale, Dern, Isaac, Phoenix – the same as the Globes).

The Nighthawk winners since 2011:

  • 2012:  Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln  (Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA, NYFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC)
  • 2013:  Leonardo DiCaprio, Wolf of Wall Street  (Globe – Comedy, Oscar, BAFTA)
  • 2014:  Michael Keaton, Birdman  (Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA, BSFC, CFC, NBR)
  • 2015:  Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant  (Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA, BSFC, CFC)
  • 2016:  Casey Affleck, Manchester by the Sea  (Oscar, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA, NYFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR, SAG)
  • 2017:  Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour  (Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA)
  • 2018:  Bradley Cooper, A Star is Born  (Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA)

The Other Genre Nighthawk winners since 2011:

  • 2012 Comedy:  Hugh Jackman, Les Miserables
  • 2013 Drama:  Chiwetel Ojiofor, 12 Years a Slave
  • 2014 Drama:  Benedict Cumberbatch, The Imitation Game
  • 2015 Comedy:  Matt Damon, The Martian
  • 2016 Comedy:  Ryan Gosling, La La Land
  • 2017 Comedy:  Hugh Jackman, The Greatest Showman
  • 2018 Drama:  Ryan Gosling, First Man

See Them for the Performance:  Denzel Washington’s performance in Roman J. Israel Esq. is now the best performance from a sub *** film (low **.5) with no other points.

Consensus Notes:  Astoundingly in the last three years we have had examples of all three kinds of Consensus races.  In 2016, we have a blowout (Casey Affleck at 40.18%, no one else above 12.29%), in 2017, we have the Top 2 finish (Timothee Chalemet at 23.06%, Gary Oldman at 20.15%) and in 2018 we have the wide open race (five actors ranging from 19.18% to 10.27% with only four Oscar nominees among them because the whole reason we have such a range is Hawke dominating the critics and being mostly passed over by awards groups).

Consensus Chart:

Year Director AA GG crit BAFTA SAG BFCA RT WT N W % Rk
2012 Day-Lewis, Daniel 70 70 259 70 70 70 609 574 9 9 38.14% 1
2012 Cooper, Bradley 35 35 56 35 35 35 231 214 6 1 14.19% 2
2012 Phoenix, Joaquin 35 35 70 35 35 210 193 5 1 12.79% 3
2012 Jackman, Hugh 35 70 35 35 35 210 182 5 1 12.09% 4
2012 Washington, Denzel 35 35 35 35 140 123 4 0 8.14% 5
2012 Hawkes, John 35 35 35 105 88 3 0 5.81% x
2012 Affleck, Ben 35 35 35 1 0 2.33% x
2012 Black, Jack 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2012 McGregor, Ewan 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2012 Murray, Bill 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2012 Gere, Richard 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2013 Ejiofor, Chiwetel 35 35 126 70 35 35 336 319 7 3 21.16% 1
2013 Dern, Bruce 35 35 126 35 35 35 301 284 7 2 18.84% 2
2013 McConaghy, Matthew 70 70 70 70 280 245 4 4 16.28% 3
2013 Redford, Robert 35 70 35 140 123 3 1 8.14% 4
2013 Bale, Christian 35 35 35 35 140 123 4 0 8.14% 4
2013 Hanks, Tom 35 35 35 35 140 123 4 0 8.14% 4
2013 DiCaprio, Leonardo 35 70 35 140 119 3 1 7.91% x
2013 Isaac, Oscar 35 63 98 88 2 1 5.81% x
2013 Whitaker, Forest 35 35 35 1 0 2.33% x
2013 Phoenix, Joaquin 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2013 Elba, Idris 35 35 25 1 0 1.63% x
2014 Keaton, Michael 35 70 182 35 35 70 427 392 8 5 24.64% 1
2014 Redmayne, Eddie 70 70 70 70 35 315 287 5 4 18.04% 2
2014 Cumberbatch, Benedict 35 35 35 35 35 175 158 5 0 9.90% 3
2014 Spall, Timothy 133 133 133 2 2 8.36% 4
2014 Carrell, Steve 35 35 30 35 135 125 4 0 7.83% 5
2014 Gyllenhaal, Jake 35 35 35 35 140 123 4 0 7.70% x
2014 Fiennes, Ralph 35 35 35 105 88 3 0 5.50% x
2014 Hardy, Tom 70 70 70 1 1 4.40% x
2014 Isaac, Oscar 56 56 56 1 1 3.52% x
2014 Oyelowo, David 35 35 70 53 2 0 3.30% x
2014 Cooper, Bradley 35 35 35 1 0 2.20% x
2014 Murray, Bill 35 35 25 1 0 1.54% x
2014 Phoenix, Joaquin 35 35 25 1 0 1.54% x
2014 Waltz, Christoph 35 35 25 1 0 1.54% x
2015 DiCaprio, Leonardo 70 70 126 70 70 70 476 441 7 7 29.78% 1
2015 Fassbender, Michael 35 35 70 35 35 35 245 228 6 1 15.36% 2
2015 Damon, Matt 35 70 56 35 35 231 203 5 2 13.71% 3
2015 Redmayne, Eddie 35 35 35 35 35 175 158 5 0 10.63% 4
2015 Cranston, Bryan 35 35 35 35 35 175 158 5 0 10.63% 4
2015 Keaton, Michael 70 70 70 1 1 4.73% x
2015 Jordan, Michael B 63 63 63 1 1 4.25% x
2015 Depp, Johnny 35 35 70 63 2 0 4.25% x
2015 Carrell, Steve 35 35 25 1 0 1.65% x
2015 Pacino, Al 35 35 25 1 0 1.65% x
2015 Ruffalo, Mark 35 35 25 1 0 1.65% x
2015 Smith, Will 35 35 25 1 0 1.65% x
2016 Affleck, Casey 70 70 315 70 35 70 630 595 10 9 40.18% 1
2016 Gosling, Ryan 35 70 35 35 35 210 182 5 1 12.29% 2
2016 Garfield, Andrew 35 35 35 35 35 175 158 5 0 10.63% 3
2016 Washington, Denzel 35 35 70 35 175 158 4 1 10.63% 3
2016 Mortenson, Viggo 35 35 35 35 140 130 4 0 8.74% 5
2016 Driver, Adam 70 70 70 1 1 4.73% x
2016 Edgerton, Joel 35 35 70 53 2 0 3.54% x
2016 Gyllenhaal, Jake 35 35 35 1 0 2.36% x
2016 Hanks, Tom 35 35 28 1 0 1.89% x
2016 Reynolds, Ryan 35 35 25 1 0 1.65% x
2016 Hill, Jonah 35 35 25 1 0 1.65% x
2016 Farrell, Colin 35 35 25 1 0 1.65% x
2017 Chalamet, Timothee 35 35 203 35 35 35 378 361 8 3 23.06% 1
2017 Oldman, Gary 70 70 70 70 70 350 315 5 5 20.15% 2
2017 Kaluuya, Daniel 35 35 126 35 35 35 301 284 8 2 18.14% 3
2017 Day-Lewis, Daniel 35 35 35 35 140 123 4 0 7.84% 4
2017 Franco, James 70 35 35 140 112 3 1 7.17% 5
2017 Hanks, Tom 35 56 35 126 109 3 1 6.94% x
2017 Washington, Denzel 35 35 35 105 95 3 0 6.05% x
2017 Carrell, Steve 35 30 65 55 2 0 3.49% x
2017 Bell, Jamie 35 35 35 1 0 2.24% x
2017 Gyllenhaal, Jake 35 35 28 1 0 1.79% x
2017 Elgort, Ansel 35 35 25 1 0 1.57% x
2017 Jackman, Hugh 35 35 25 1 0 1.57% x
2018 Hawke, Ethan 266 35 301 294 5 4 19.18% 1
2018 Malek, Rami 70 70 70 70 35 315 287 5 4 18.72% 2
2018 Mortenson, Viggo 35 35 56 35 35 35 231 214 6 1 13.93% 3
2018 Bale, Christian 35 70 35 35 70 245 210 5 2 13.70% 4
2018 Cooper, Bradley 35 35 35 35 35 175 158 5 0 10.27% 5
2018 Reilly, John C. 35 63 98 88 2 1 5.71% x
2018 Dafoe, Willem 35 35 35 105 88 3 0 5.71% x
2018 Washington, John David 35 35 70 60 2 0 3.88% x
2018 Coogan, Steve 35 35 35 1 0 2.28% x
2018 Gosling, Ryan 35 35 28 1 0 1.83% x
2018 Redford, Robert 35 35 25 1 0 1.60% x
2018 Miranda, Lin-Manuel 35 35 25 1 0 1.60% x
2018 Hedges, Lucas 35 35 25 1 0 1.60% x