A Century of Film

Supporting Actor

Film has always relied on supporting performances but awards groups haven’t always recognized them right away.  It wasn’t until the 9th Academy Awards that the first supporting awards were given out.  Likewise, the BAFTAs would go through their first 20 awards without the category and no critics group would give such an award until 1957.  But eventually, of course, all the awards groups followed through and today it’s one way of celebrating great character actors although it has also been a chance for big stars to win their Oscar at last.  Supporting performances can be a role that runs through the whole film (like the way the Academy nominated Gene Hackman for I Never Sang for My Father or Al Pacino for The Godfather) or for a performance that dominates the film in spite of only being in a few scenes (like Orson Welles in The Third Man).

note:  A note on the years.  Because I use the Academy calendar for all of my awards but often have people asking about the actual release year of a film, any film with two dates listed, the first is its original release date and the second is the year it was Oscar eligible and thus Nighthawk eligible.  Down below, I only use one date when referencing awards and that’s the year the film was eligible for that award, which might not be its original release year or its Oscar year, depending on the award in question.

note:  Critical Acclaim.  That’s a phrase I will use below several times.  So that I don’t have to keep repeating what it means, it’s based on the Consensus Awards that I do.  My feelings don’t play into those awards except by the percentages I assign.  60 points for a win, 30 for a nomination.  100% for the Oscars, SAG, BAFTA, NYFC, LAFC, 90% for the BSFC, CFC, NSFC, 80% for the BFCA, NBR, 70% for the Globes.  Then, I calculate percentage of the total points.  That’s because in 1943 (the first year of the Globes) there were 228 total points and in 2017 there were 1176 total points, so the percentage of the total points is the best way to account for historical changes in scores.  So, the performance with the highest percentage of the year’s total points has the most critical acclaim under the definition I am using (it’s Gene Hackman, 1992, Unforgiven).

My Top 5 Supporting Actor Performances in Film History:

  1. Al Pacino, The Godfather, 1972
  2. Ralph Fiennes, Schindler’s List, 1993
  3. Claude Rains, Casablanca, 1942/1943
  4. Gene Hackman, Unforgiven, 1992
  5. Ian McKellen, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, 2001

The other 9 Point Performances (chronological by Nighthawk eligibility):

  • Claude Rains, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, 1939
  • Sydney Greenstreet, The Maltese Falcon, 1941
  • Walter Huston, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, 1948
  • Orson Welles, The Third Man, 1949/1950
  • Erich von Stroheim, Sunset Blvd., 1950
  • George Sanders, All About Eve, 1950
  • Toshiro Mifune, Rashomon, 1950/1952
  • Karl Malden, A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951
  • Karl Malden, On the Waterfront, 1954
  • Toshiro Mifune, The Seven Samurai, 1954/1956
  • Jack Lemmon, Mr. Roberts, 1955
  • George C. Scott  The Hustler, 1961
  • Omar Sharif  Lawrence of Arabia, 1962
  • Sterling Hayden  Dr. Strangelove, 1964
  • Gene Hackman  Bonnie and Clyde, 1967
  • Anthony Hopkins  The Lion in Winter, 1968
  • Gene Wilder  The Producers, 1969
  • Henry Fonda  Once Upon a Time in the West, 1968/1969
  • Robert De Niro  The Godfather Part II, 1974
  • Alec Guinness  Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, 1977
  • Robert Duvall  Apocalypse Now, 1979
  • Howard Rollins, Jr.  Ragtime, 1981
  • Jack Nicholson  Terms of Endearment, 1983
  • Haing S. Ngor  The Killing Fields, 1984
  • Michael Caine  Hannah and Her Sisters, 1986
  • Dennis Hopper  Blue Velvet, 1986
  • Mandy Patinken  The Princess Bride, 1987
  • Kevin Kline  A Fish Called Wanda, 1988
  • Denzel Washington  Glory, 1989
  • Joe Pesci  GoodFellas, 1990
  • Martin Landau  Ed Wood, 1994
  • Kevin Spacey  The Usual Suspects, 1995
  • William H. Macy  Fargo, 1996
  • Kevin Spacey  L.A. Confidential, 1997
  • Tom Cruise  Magnolia, 1999
  • Bruce Greenwood  Thirteen Days, 2000
  • Ben Kingsley  Sexy Beast, 2001
  • Sean Astin  The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, 2003
  • Michael Sheen  The Queen, 2006
  • Heath Ledger  The Dark Knight, 2008
  • Christoph Waltz  Inglourious Basterds, 2009

note:  I rate all aspects of film on a 9 point scale.  They also correspond to the 100 point scale for Best Picture.  Films above *** (76-99) all land on the scale.  1 point is for 76-79, just worth mentioning.  2 points is for 80-83, a weak mention, 3 points is for 84-87, near great, 4 points is for 88-89 (which is ****), a solid nominee, 5 points is for 90-91, a very solid nominee, 6 points is for 92-93, a weak winner, a 7 points is for 94-95, a worthwhile winner, 8 points is 96-97, the kind of winner you can’t complain about even if it’s not your #1 choice and 9 points is for 98-99, the very best of all-time.  The above list are my 9 point films for Supporting Actor through 2011, listed chronologically.

Best Performances All-Time by Decade:

  • 1920’s:  Max Schreck, Nosferatu, 1922/1929
  • 1930’s:  Claude Rains, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, 1939
  • 1940’s:  Claude Rains, Casablanca, 1942/1943
  • 1950’s:  Karl Malden, A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951
  • 1960’s:  George C. Scott, The Hustler, 1961
  • 1970’s:  Al Pacino, The Godfather, 1972
  • 1980’s:  Denzel Washington, Glory, 1989
  • 1990’s:  Ralph Fiennes, Schindler’s List, 1993
  • 2000’s:  Ian McKellen, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, 2001
  • 2010’s:  Christian Bale, The Fighter, 2010

Best Performance All-Time by Age:

note:  Age is based on subtracting the year they were born from the year the film was originally released.  I’m not going to try to figure out when the birthday is or when the film was made.

  • pre-teen:  Haley Joel Osment, The Sixth Sense, 1999, 11
  • teenager:  River Phoenix, Running on Empty, 1988, 17
  • 20’s:  Heath Ledger, The Dark Knight, 2008, 29
  • 30’s:  Al Pacino, The Godfather, 1972, 32
  • 40’s:  Joe Pesci, GoodFellas, 1990, 47
  • 50’s:  Claude Rains, Casablanca, 1942, 53
  • 60’s:  Gene Hackman, Unforgiven, 1992, 62
  • 70’s:  Christopher Plummer, The Insider, 1999, 70
  • 80’s:  Christopher Plummer, Beginners, 2011, 82
Best Performances All-Time by Genre:
  • Action:  Heath Ledger, The Dark Knight, 2008
  • Adventure:  Alan Rickman, Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, 1991
  • Comedy:  Martin Landau, Ed Wood, 1994
  • Crime:  Al Pacino, The Godfather, 1972
  • Drama:  Ralph Fiennes, Schindler’s List, 1993
  • Fantasy:  Ian McKellen, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, 2001
  • Horror:  Haley Joel Osment, The Sixth Sense, 1999
  • Kids:  Ray Bolger, The Wizard of Oz, 1939
  • Musical:  George Chakiris, West Side Story, 1961
  • Mystery:  Sydney Greenstreet, The Maltese Falcon, 1941
  • Sci-Fi:  Alec Guinness, Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, 1977
  • Suspense:  Claude Rains, Notorious, 1946
  • War:  Denzel Washington, Glory, 1989
  • Western:  Gene Hackman, Unforgiven, 1992

Four Oscar nominations but sadly, no Oscar for one of the great character actors of all-time.

The Actors:

Claude Rains

There is no better character actor in the history of film.  He only appears on my Best Actor list twice, both times hard to see (The Invisible Man, Phantom of the Opera) but he’s on my Supporting Actor list a whopping 11 times earning 10 nominations and winning the Nighthawk three times.  As you can see from the list above, he is one of only five actors to earn multiple perfect 9 scores.  He would also earn 4 Oscar nominations though, sadly, would never win.  To give an idea of how great I think he was, by 1946, he had over 400 absolute points (see below) while it would take until 1960 before any other actor would even have 200.
Key Films:  Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Casablanca, Notorious

Walter Brennan

Not one of my personal favorites and I think two of his three Oscars are two of the three worst ever awarded in the category.  Nonetheless, you can’t ignore the fact that he won three of the first five Oscars awarded in this category and that he was a key character actor in films throughout the 30’s and 40’s.
Key Films:  Come and Get It, Kentucky, Red River

Arthur Kennedy

Arthur Kennedy received one Oscar nomination for Best Actor (Bright Victory) but was mainly known through the 50’s as the male equivalent of Thelma Ritter, the guy who kept getting nominated but never winning.  He was nominated for five Oscars in total, all in the space of a decade, including three supporting nominations in four years in 1955, 1957 and 1958.  He never makes it higher than third at the Nighthawks but he also has six finishes in the Top 7 and he’s always worth watching, even in dreck like Peyton Place.
Key Films:  Champion, Trial, Some Came Running

Alec Guinness

Alec Guinness, of course, is the ultimate chameleon, sliding into character roles but also was a lead as well.  He received two Oscar nominations in Supporting Actor (Star Wars, Little Dorrit).  But he receives five Nighthawk nominations, winning for Star Wars and two other performances that land in the Top 7 and a lot of those performances in films like Kind Hearts and Coronets, Oliver Twist and The Comedians were overlooked by all awards groups.
Key Films:  Oliver Twist, Kind Hearts and Coronets, Star Wars

Gene Hackman

The winner of three Nighthawk Awards, one of which he won the Oscar for (Unforgiven) and the other two of which earned him nominations (Bonnie and Clyde, I Never Sang for My Father).  That doesn’t even include work like Superman, Under Fire or No Way Out.  Also a great lead actor.
Key Films:  Bonnie and Clyde, I Never Sang for My Father, Unforgiven

Robert Duvall

The supporting star of the 70’s.  The only Oscar nominations he received that decade were for The Godfather and Apocalypse Now (the latter of which he should have won the Oscar for) but he was also great in supporting in M*A*S*H, The Godfather Part II and Network.  And that doesn’t even bring up his later Oscar nomination for A Civil Action.
Key Films:  The Godfather, Network, Apocalypse Now

Denholm Elliott

Only Oscar nominated once, for A Room with a View, but he has by far the most points in BAFTA history.  Indeed, in the mid 80’s, Elliott won three straight BAFTAs in this category (Trading Places, A Private Function, Defence of the Realm).  He is also one of my favorite actors and always a joy to behold who gets off my favorite line in Raiders of the Lost Ark (“That’s just what the Hebrews thought.”).
Key Films:  A Private Function, Defence of the Realm, A Room with a View

Ian Holm

Another BAFTA favorite, winning for The Bofors Gun and Chariots of Fire and second all-time in BAFTA points.  Like Elliott, only has one Oscar nom (Chariots) but all of the awards groups ignored his performances in films like Alien and Fellowship of the Ring.  Winner of the 1985 Boston Society of Film Critics for four really good performances that year in Brazil, Dreamchild, Wetherby and Dance with a Stranger.  And none of that even includes his great television work (Les Miserables, Holocaust, All Quiet on the Western Front) or his voice performance in Ratatouille.
Key Films:  Alien, Chariots of Fire, Fellowship of the Ring

Jack Nicholson

Another lead actor who also earned a lot of plaudits in supporting.  His first Oscar nomination was in supporting (Easy Rider) and was nominated again in 1981 (Reds) and won in 1983 (Terms of Endearment) before earning another nom in 1992 (A Few Good Men).  Between those four performances he won 11 critics awards, far more than any other actor in the category.  He also earned Globe nominations for all four and for The Departed, giving him the most Globe points.
Key Films:  Reds, Terms of Endearment, A Few Good Men.

Michael Caine

I originally didn’t have Caine listed here, thinking of him more in lead.  But he has now nearly caught Claude Rains for total absolute Nighthawk points and he did win two Oscars in the category (Hannah and Her Sisters, The Cider House Rules) and he was criminally overlooked for California Suite.  He really started cranking out strong supporting performances in the 2000’s with The Weather Man, Batman Begins, The Prestige, Children of Men and The Dark Knight.
Key Films:  California Suite, Hannah and Her Sisters, Mona Lisa

Philip Seymour Hoffman

Winner of the 1999 NBR for Magnolia and The Talented Mr. Ripley, Oscar (and other awards groups) nominated for Charlie Wilson’s War and Doubt and none of that even includes his best supporting performance which is Almost Famous.  In the 00’s, earned more points than any actor in any decade except Claude Rains in the 40’s and Robert Duvall in the 70’s.
Key Films:  Almost Famous, Charlie Wilson’s War, Doubt

The Academy Awards

Summary:

This category began at the Oscars in 1936 with Walter Brennan winning the Oscar as he would also do two other times (1938, 1940) which meant that by the fifth year of this category’s existence Brennan already had more points than any other actor would earn in it even through to today.  A number of trivia items can be found in the posts linked below as well as the items listed in the next few paragraphs.

I am not going to list the entire field of Oscar nominees over the years because you can find it here and I already listed it here and here.  Plus it would take too long to type and make the post way too long.  The second list also includes my lists of nominees through 2009 though my annual Nighthawk Awards supersede that list as my lists are always fluid.

Multiple Nominations:

Unlike Makeup, the first category I covered in this series, a film can earn multiple nominations in this category, like all the acting categories (and Song).  The first film to do that was Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (which lost both in 1939) and though it wouldn’t happen again until the 50’s, five films in the 50’s would earn multiple nominations with On the Waterfront becoming the first film to earn three nominations.  Overall, three films have earned three nominations (with only The Godfather Part II winning the Oscar) and fourteen films have earned two nominations (with four of them winning the Oscar, all between 1971 and 1983 – The Last Picture Show, Julia, Ordinary People, Terms of Endearment).

Directors:

As is the case with most of the acting categories, William Wyler rules the roost here.  He directed 10 nominated performances and an astounding five of them won the Oscar (including twice for Walter Brennan).  Only six other directors have directed even more than one winning performance (three each for John Ford, Elia Kazan and Clint Eastwood, two each for Fred Zinnemann, Joseph L. Mankiewicz and Mervyn LeRoy).  Likewise, only two other directors have even directed five nominated performances, with Francis Ford Coppola directing nine (seven just from Godfather films but only one winner), Elia Kazan with six (three winners and then three non-winners all from one film) and five each from Ford, Zinnemann and Sidney Lumet (the only director with at least five nominations but no wins).  For a long time, it wasn’t very common for directors to earn back-to-back nominations in this category.  In fact, before any director did that, William Wyler had two films nominated in the same year (1940 – The Westerner, The Letter).  Eventually, nine directors would have back-to-back years with nominations with two directors having three successive nominations (Joshua Logan in 55-57 and Sidney Lumet in 75-77).  Elia Kazan (51-52), William Wyler (58-59) and Clint Eastwood (03-04) would all direct back-to-back winners.  In 1975 and 76 both Sidney Lumet and John Schlesinger would have nominees in each year.  Of course, one of the amazing things about Wyler is that his total, while much higher than anyone else, still only accounts for less than 9% of his films’ Oscar points, less than most of the other directors mentioned here.  There are 13 directors whose only Oscar nomination for a film is for Supporting Actor but Mike Mills is the only one to have his film actually win that single nomination (Beginners).

Sequels:

The Godfather sequels would earn four nominations and an Oscar in this category which is especially surprising when you consider that until 2008 no other sequel had ever even earned a nomination.  But in 2008, Heath Ledger won the Oscar for The Dark Knight.  However, all of those nominations were for performers who weren’t in the earlier films.

Genres:

Drama dominates Supporting Actor even more than it dominates the total awards, accounting for 51.84% of all the nominees as opposed to 42.83% of all nominations.  Ironically the only year it had all five nominees it only had four films (1951, with Quo Vadis nominated twice) but it’s had four nominees on numerous occasions, most recently in 2011 and 2009.  The only years with no Drama nominees were 1947, 1972 and 1974 (the last two years dominated by Crime with three Godfather nominees each time).  It’s followed by Comedy, Crime and War.  Musicals, which do well overall at the Oscars (11.60%) do poorly in Supporting Actor (3.42%) and have only earned three nominations since 1982.  The categories with the fewest nominations are Kids (Miracle on 34th Street, Black Stallion, Babe), Sci-Fi (Star Wars, Cocoon, 12 Monkeys) and Fantasy (Fellowship of the Ring).  Drama has won almost half the time (37 out of 76), followed by Comedy (14), Crime (7), War (5) and Western (5).  Only Adventure, Horror and Fantasy have never won.

Best Picture:

Fifteen films have won the Oscar for Best Picture and Supporting Actor, starting with The Life of Emile Zola and including at least one every decade with the longest gap being 1961 to 1974.  Another 31 Picture winners have earned Supporting Actor nominations with On the Waterfront and The Godfather earning three each and Rocky and Platoon earning two each.  The longest streak of Picture winners with at least a nomination is six (1959-64).  Only once has there been three straight years where no Picture winner earned at least a nomination (1995-97).  Another 25 films won Supporting Actor while being nominated for Picture.  In total, 164 films have been at least nominated for both Picture and Supporting Actor.  There has never been a year when all five nominees were from Picture nominees though there have been several years where four of the five nominees did including the oddity of 1954 when the three nominees from the Picture winner (On the Waterfront) all lost to the only nominee not from a Picture winner (The Barefoot Contessa).  The only year with no nominees from Picture nominees is 1988.

Foreign Films:

This is the only acting category and the only other category aside from Visual Effects where no Foreign language film has ever been nominated.  There have been three nominations in which the character spoke primarily a language other than English (Graham Greene in Dances with Wolves, Benicio del Toro in Traffic, who won and Ken Watanabe in The Last Samurai).

Single Nominations:

Only 46 films have received a nomination for Supporting Actor but no other nominations.  That’s only 12.11%, the lowest of the acting categories and one of the lowest of all categories.  Only five of those films won the Oscar, tied with Actor for least among acting (the five films are Kentucky, Johnny Eager, Topkapi, City Slickers, Beginners).

Other Categories:

Unless you want to count both Screenplay categories together (201), the category most often nominated with Supporting Actor is actually Picture (164) which makes sense since there have been so many years with more than 5 nominees in the Picture category.  I often think of Actress and Supporting Actor being nominated together but it’s not true.  Actress and Supporting Actor have only been nominated together 78 times, far fewer than Supporting Actress (92) and especially Actor (108).  Ironically, though, both Actor and Actress have five overlapping films that won the Oscar for both that category and Supporting Actor (there are 8 that won both supporting awards).  Aside from Picture and Actor, the categories that overlap more than 100 times are the expected ones with the most nominations: Adapted Screenplay, Editing, Cinematography, Score and Art Direction.  Though, it surprising that Score, with by far the most total nominations (well over 700) only overlaps with Supporting Actor 102 times.  Overall, 51 of the 81 films nominated for 10 or more Oscars were nominated for Supporting Actor.

The Academy Awards Top 10:

  1. Walter Brennan  –  210
  2. Peter Ustinov  –  150
  3. Jason Robards  –  150
  4. Jack Nicholson  –  150
  5. Charles Coburn  –  120
  6. Claude Rains  –  120
  7. Anthony Quinn  –  120
  8. Arthur Kennedy  –  120
  9. Gig Young  –  120
  10. Melvyn Douglas  –  120
  11. Jack Palance  –  120
  12. Gene Hackman  –  120
  13. Martin Landau  –  120
  14. Michael Caine  –  120

note:  Wins are worth 60 points and nominations are worth 30.
note:  Rains and Kennedy are the only ones on the list without an Oscar and are the only ones aside from Nicholson with four nominations.  Brennan had three wins.  Ustinov, Robards, Quinn, Douglas and Caine all had two wins.  The rest had two wins and a nomination except Nicholson who had a win and three nominations.

Top 5 Oscar Winners:

  1. Gene Hackman  (Unforgiven)
  2. Karl Malden  (A Streetcar Named Desire)
  3. Martin Landau  (Ed Wood)
  4. Kevin Kline  (A Fish Called Wanda)
  5. Joe Pesci  (GoodFellas)

Worst 5 Oscar Winners:

  1. Walter Brennan  (Come and Get It)
  2. Burl Ives  (The Big Country)
  3. Walter Brennan  (Kentucky)
  4. Peter Ustinov  (Topkapi)
  5. Jack Albertson  (The Subject Was Roses)

Worst 5 Oscar Nominees:

  1. Brandon de Wilde  (Shane)
  2. Ethan Hawke  (Training Day)
  3. Chill Wills  (The Alamo)
  4. Walter Bendix  (Wake Island)
  5. Joaquin Phoenix  (Gladiator)

10 Best Performances Not Nominated for an Oscar:

  1. Toshiro Mifune  (Rashomon)
  2. Mandy Patinken  (The Princess Bride)
  3. Michael Sheen  (The Queen)
  4. Toshiro Mifune  (The Seven Samurai)
  5. Anthony Hopkins  (The Lion in Winter)
  6. Kevin Spacey  (L.A. Confidential)
  7. Orson Welles  (The Third Man)
  8. Henry Fonda  (Once Upon a Time in the West)
  9. Sterling Hayden  (Dr. Strangelove)
  10. Sean Astin  (The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King)

note:  Dennis Hopper probably would be 8th or 9th for Blue Velvet but that performance couldn’t be nominated since he was nominated for Hoosiers instead.

5 Most Acclaimed Performances to not Win the Oscar (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. Ralph Fiennes, 1993, Schindler’s List
  2. Thomas Haden Church, 2004, Sideways
  3. Burt Reynolds, 1997, Boogie Nights
  4. Danny Aiello, 1989, Do the Right Thing
  5. Dennis Hopper, 1986, Hoosiers

note:  Dennis Hopper earned most of those Consensus points for both Hoosiers and Blue Velvet so he’s kind of a special case.
note:  I didn’t count four performances that would have come between Fiennes and Church from the 1940’s and 50’s when there were very few awards, for people who won the Globe and earned an Oscar nom but not the win: Akim Tamiroff (1943, For Whom the Bell Tolls), J. Carrol Naish (1945, A Medal for Benny), Clifton Webb (1946, Razor’s Edge) and Peter Ustinov (1951, Quo Vadis).

5 Least Acclaimed Performance to Win the Oscar (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. Don Ameche, 1985, Cocoon
  2. James Coburn, 1998, Affliction
  3. Robert De Niro, 1974, The Godfather Part II
  4. Jack Albertson, 1968, The Subject Was Roses
  5. George Burns, 1975, The Sunshine Boys

note:  It’s interesting that these last two lists don’t overlap at all.  There isn’t a year where the Oscars picked the surprise choice over the consensus choice.

5 Most Acclaimed Performances to not earn an Oscar nomination (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. Albert Brooks, 2011, Drive
  2. Robert Morley, 1978, Who is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe
  3. John Geilgud, 1985, The Shooting Party or Plenty
  4. Bill Murray, 1998, Rushmore
  5. Robert De Niro, 1973, Mean Streets or Bang the Drum Slowly

note:  Also note Christopher Plummer (1999, The Insider) and Steve Buscemi (2001, Ghost World) just off the list.
note:  I won’t do a least acclaimed for this because it’s just going to be five very recent performances that earned no other nominations, since there are so many points available nowadays.

Top 5 Oscar Years:

  1. 1972  (Joel Grey (Cabaret), Al Pacino, Robert Duvall, James Caan (The Godfather), Eddie Albert (The Heartbreak Kid))
  2. 1992  (Gene Hackman (Unforgiven), Jack Nicholson (A Few Good Men), Jaye Davidson (The Crying Game), Al Pacino (Glengarry Glen Ross), David Paymer (Mr. Saturday Night))
  3. 1987  (Sean Connery (The Untouchables), Denzel Washington (Cry Freedom), Albert Brooks (Broadcast News), Morgan Freeman (Street Smart), Vincent Gardenia (Moonstruck))
  4. 2005  (George Clooney (Syriana), Jake Gyllenhaal (Brokeback Mountain), William Hurt (A History of Violence), Matt Dillon (Crash), Paul Giamatti (Cinderella Man))
  5. 1994  (Martin Landau (Ed Wood), Samuel L. Jackson (Pulp Fiction), Paul Scofield (Quiz Show), Gary Sinise (Forrest Gump), Chazz Palminteri (Bullets over Broadway)

Top 5 Oscars Years by Oscar Score:

  1. 2005  –  100  (George Clooney (Syriana), Jake Gyllenhaal (Brokeback Mountain), William Hurt (A History of Violence), Matt Dillon (Crash), Paul Giamatti (Cinderella Man))
  2. 2010  –  100  (Christian Bale (The Fighter), Geoffrey Rush (The King’s Speech), John Hawkes (Winter’s Bone), Mark Ruffalo (The Kids are All Right), Jeremy Renner (The Town))
  3. 1988  –  100  (Kevin Kline (A Fish Called Wanda), River Phoenix (Running on Empty), Alec Guinness (Little Dorrit), Martin Landau (Tucker), Dean Stockwell (Married to the Mob))
  4. 1945  –  100  (James Dunn (A Tree Grows in Brooklyn), Robert Mitchum (The Story of GI Joe), J. Carrol Naish (A Medal for Benny), John Dall (The Corn is Green), Michael Chekhov (Spellbound))
  5. 1972  –  97.3  (Joel Grey (Cabaret), Al Pacino, Robert Duvall, James Caan (The Godfather), Eddie Albert (The Heartbreak Kid))

note:  The difference between this list and the previous one is that the first one is a flat total based on my 9 point scale.  In this one, it’s comparing my top five performances to the ones the Oscars actually nominated.  So, in the first one, it’s how good are the nominees.  In this one it’s how good are the nominees compared to what else was eligible.

Worst 5 Oscar Years:

  1. 1936  (Walter Brennan (Come and Get It), Basil Rathbone (Romeo and Juliet), Mischa Auer (My Man Godfrey), Stuart Erwin (Pigskin Parade), Akim Tamiroff (The General Died at Dawn))
  2. 1938  (Walter Brennan (Kentucky), Robert Morley (Marie Antoinette), John Garfield (Four Daughters), Gene Lockhart (Algiers), Basil Rathbone (If I Were King))
  3. 1937  (Joseph Schildkraut (The Life of Emile Zola), Ralph Bellamy (The Awful Truth), Roland Young (Topper), Thomas Mitchell (The Hurricane), H.B. Warner (Lost Horizon))
  4. 1958  (Burl Ives (The Big Country), Lee J. Cobb (The Brothers Karamazov), Theodore Bikel (The Defiant Ones), Arthur Kennedy (Some Came Running), Gig Young (Teacher’s Pet))
  5. 1952  (Anthony Quinn (Viva Zapata), Richard Burton (My Cousin Rachel), Jack Palance (Sudden Fear), Victor McLaglen (The Quiet Man), Arthur Hunnicutt (The Big Sky))

Worst 5 Oscar Years by Oscar Score:

  1. 1938  –  37.0  (Walter Brennan (Kentucky), Robert Morley (Marie Antoinette), John Garfield (Four Daughters), Gene Lockhart (Algiers), Basil Rathbone (If I Were King))
  2. 1936  –  42.9  (Walter Brennan (Come and Get It), Basil Rathbone (Romeo and Juliet), Mischa Auer (My Man Godfrey), Stuart Erwin (Pigskin Parade), Akim Tamiroff (The General Died at Dawn))
  3. 1964  –  54.3  (Peter Ustinov (Topkapi), Lee Tracy (The Best Man), Stanley Holloway (My Fair Lady), John Gielgud (Becket), Edmond O’Brien (Seven Days in May))
  4. 1939  –  59.4  (Thomas Mitchell (Stagecoach), Claude Rains (Mr. Smith Goes to Washington), Harrey Carey (Mr. Smith Goes to Washington), Brian Aherne (Juarez), Brian Donleavy (Beau Geste))
  5. 1952  –  60.0  (Anthony Quinn (Viva Zapata), Richard Burton (My Cousin Rachel), Jack Palance (Sudden Fear), Victor McLaglen (The Quiet Man), Arthur Hunnicutt (The Big Sky))

Oscar Scores by Decade:

  • 1930’s:  53.0
  • 1940’s:  78.7
  • 1950’s:  74.0
  • 1960’s:  73.4
  • 1970’s:  82.0
  • 1980’s:  84.4
  • 1990’s:  85.7
  • 2000’s:  87.0
  • 2010’s:  90.6
  • All-Time:  80.6

Top 5 Films to win the Oscar (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. GoodFellas
  2. A Streetcar Named Desire
  3. West Side Story
  4. Treasure of the Sierra Madre
  5. The Best Years of Our Lives

Worst 5 Films to win the Oscar  (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. The Big Country
  2. The Barefoot Contessa
  3. Topkapi
  4. Kentucky
  5. Sayonara

Worst 5 Films to earn an Oscar nomination (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. Love Story
  2. Training Day
  3. Only When I Laugh
  4. The Farmer’s Daughter
  5. Peyton Place

Years in Which the Worst of the Nominees Won the Oscar:

  • 1945:  James Dunn (A Medal for Benny) over Robert Mitchum, J. Carrol Naish, John Dall, Michael Chekhov
  • 1954:  Edmund O’Brien (The Barefoot Contessa) over Karl Malden, Lee J. Cobb, Rod Steiger, Tom Tully
  • 2006:  Alan Arkin (Little Miss Sunshine) over Mark Wahlberg, Jackie Earle Haley, Eddie Murphy, Djimon Honsou

Oscar Oddities:

  • Barry Fitzgerald, Going My Way, 1944
    • He is actually nominated for both Actor and Supporting Actor, winning the latter.
  • Burl Ives, The Big Country, 1958
    • Though he also won the Globe, it really stuns me this was for The Big Country and not Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.
  • Chill Wills, The Alamo, 1960
    • Wills’s publicist runs a really tasteless ad about how his co-stars are fighting as hard for Wills to win as the real heroes of the Alamo did for their lives and calls all of Hollywood his brothers.  Groucho Marx replies in an ad that’s he glad to be Wills’ brother but he voted for Sal Mineo (Exodus).  In spite of that and Mineo winning the Globe, Peter Ustinov wins the Oscar.  Ustinov, like Ives, wins for one film while a different film of his is nominated for Best Picture (in this case, Spartacus rather than Sundowners).
  • Martin Balsam, A Thousand Clowns, 1965
    • Balsam tells Shelley Winters after the ceremony that he won because he didn’t win for Breakfast at Tiffany’s which is incredibly bizarre since not only wasn’t he nominated for Breakfast at the Oscars or even the Globes but he was barely in the film.
  • Gene Hackman, I Never Sang for My Father, 1970
    • A good example of why I place things in Oscar categories so that I can compare apples to apples.  But this was the lead role in the film and it was utterly absurd that he was nominated in supporting.  This will come up again in 1972 (Pacino, but at least the NBR also gave Pacino a supporting award).
  • Robert De Niro, The Godfather Part II, 1974
    • A pleasant surprise.  A year after De Niro won two critics awards and failed to earn a nomination, his Oscar win is his only nomination.  But I think the Oscars got this one right.
  • Don Ameche, Cocoon, 1985
    • The last Oscar winner with no other nominations and it’s a bizarre choice.  Klaus Maria Brandauer won the NYFC, NBR and Globe and Out of Africa won Best Picture but he didn’t win the Oscar.
  • Dennis Hopper, Hoosiers, 1986
    • Even Hopper was stunned when they nominated him for Hoosiers instead of Blue Velvet.
  • Kevin Kline, A Fish Called Wanda, 1988
    • A big surprise as the other four nominees all had at least one critics win each and Kline only had a BAFTA nomination (in lead).  But I think the Academy got this one right with one of the funniest performances in film history.
  • Bill Murray, Rushmore, 1998
    • He wins three critics awards and can’t even earn a nomination.  And the Oscar goes to James Coburn for Affliction whose only other awards attention was a SAG nom.
  • Alan Arkin, Little Miss Sunshine, 2006
    • The weakest of the five nominees wins over the Globe / BFCA / SAG winner (Eddie Murphy), the NYFC / CFC winner (Jackie Earle Haley), the NSFC / BSFC winner (Mark Wahlberg) and the NBR winner (Djimon Honsou).

Kudos to the Oscars – the best post-1967 performances nominated by the Oscars but no one else

  1. Robert De Niro, The Godfather Part II, 1974
  2. Gene Wilder, The Producers, 1968
  3. Albert Brooks, Broadcast News, 1987
  4. Martin Landau, Crimes and Misdemeanors, 1989
  5. Robert Forster, Jackie Brown, 1997

The BAFTAs

Summary:

It would take until 1968, when the BAFTAs dropped their British categories that they finally established supporting acting awards.  While it was an all-encompassing award, it was, right from the start, heavily favored towards British actors.  The first four winners were all British from British films and they trended that way for quite a while (in the 80’s the only winners not from the British isles were Jack Nicholson and Daniel Auteuil).  And even by 2011, of the top seven actors on the BAFTA points list, five are British (and one is Australian).  For years, the BAFTA Awards were after the Oscars and they clearly weren’t influenced because until the 21st Century only four actors won both awards.  That has changed in recent years as Bill Nighy (2003, Love Actually) was the last BAFTA winner without an Oscar nom and most actors now win both.  Denholm Elliott is the king of the award, having won three consecutive years (1983-85) and earning four other nominations.  BAFTA Awards can be hard to line up with other awards because of different eligibility years (both the 1984 and 1985 Elliott awards, for example, were Oscar eligible in 1985 and thus appear in the Consensus Awards that year).  In 1980, the BAFTAs didn’t give out either supporting award.  The next year, they called it Best Supporting Artist but all four of the nominees were male.

Sequels:

The BAFTAs have given the award to a sequel once (Ledger) and nominated two other performances (Sean Connery, 1989, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade and Ian McKellen, 2003, Return of the King).

Genres:

Like the Oscars, Drama is the big one here because it simply has the most films.  Just over 50% of the nominees and almost 45% of the winners come from Dramas.  Next up for both is Comedy, with 15% of the nominees and 14% of the winners.  The only genre without a nomination is Horror while Fantasy, Sci-Fi and Kids all have nominations but no winners.

Best Picture:

The King’s Speech is the big film here, the only film to win Picture, British Film and Supporting Actor.  Six other films have won Picture and Supporting Actor while Elizabeth won British Film and Supporting Actor.  Fourteen other films have won Picture and been nominated for Supporting Actor (five of them earning two nominations).  A whopping 18 films have won Supporting Actor while being nominated for Picture.  Overall, 74 films have earned at least a nomination in both categories while 8 more earned British Film nominations and Supporting Actor nominations (with Love Actually winning the latter).  Only 16 films have won Supporting Actor without a Picture or British Film nomination.

Single Nominees:

Of the 172 films nominated for Supporting Actor (185 nominations), 28 of them earned no other nominations with only three of those (Defence of the Realm, Rob Roy, Beginners) winning the award.

Foreign Films:

The BAFTAs are better than the Oscars.  There have only been three nominees from Foreign language films but two of them won the BAFTA (Daniel Auteuil, Jean de Florette, 1987 and Salvatore Cascio, Cinema Paradiso, 1990) with the third nominee being Rodrigo de la Serna (The Motorcycle Diaries, 2004).

Other Categories:

Supporting Actor nominated films tend to pile it on.  Of the 173 films nominated for Supporting Actor, over 70 each have earned Picture or Director nominations (usually both) and almost 70 have been nominated for Editing.  In fact, more films with Supporting Actor nominations have earned 10 or more nominations (33) than just the one nomination (28).  The acting is pretty evenly distributed, with 48 nominated for Actor, 47 for Supporting Actress and 38 for Actress.  Of the five films nominated for all four, two of them won Supporting Actor (Reds, A Fish Called Wanda).  The only category with no overlap with Supporting Actor is Animated Film and the short-lived Song category.

The BAFTA Top 10:

  1. Denholm Elliott  –  300
  2. Ian Holm  –  180
  3. Edward Fox  –  150
  4. John Hurt  –  150
  5. John Gielgud  –  150
  6. Jack Nicholson  –  150
  7. Geoffrey Rush  –  120
  8. Robert Duvall  –  120
  9. Ray McAnally  –  120
  10. Alan Rickman  /  Tom Wilkinson  –  120

Top 5 BAFTA Winners:

  1. Ralph Fiennes, Schindler’s List, 1993
  2. Gene Hackman, Unforgiven, 1992
  3. Robert Duvall, Apocalypse Now, 1979
  4. Heath Ledger, The Dark Knight, 2008
  5. Christoph Waltz, Inglourious Basterds, 2009

Top 5 BAFTA Years  (4 Nominees, 1968-1998):

  1. 1993  (Ralph Fiennes (Schindler’s List), Tommy Lee Jones (Fugitive), Ben Kingsley (Schindler’s List), John Malkovich (In the Line of Fire))
  2. 1995  (Tim Roth (Rob Roy), Martin Landau (Ed Wood), Alan Rickman (Sense and Sensibility), Ian Holm (Madness of King George))
  3. 1986  (Ray McAnally (The Mission), Klaus Maria Brandeur (Out of Africa), Denholm Elliott, Simon Callow (Room with a View))
  4. 1989  (Ray McAnally (My Left Foot), Jack Nicholson (Batman), Sean Connery (Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade), Marlon Brando (A Dry White Season))
  5. 1992  (Gene Hackman (Unforgiven), Jaye Davidson (Crying Game), Tommy Lee Jones (JFK), Samuel West (Howards End))

Top 5 BAFTA Years  (5 Nominees, 1999-2011):

  1. 2005  (Jake Gyllenhaal (Brokeback Mountain), George Clooney (Syriana, Good Night and Good Luck), Matt Dillon, Don Cheadle (Crash))
  2. 2002  (Christopher Walken (Catch Me if You Can), Chris Cooper (Adaptation), Paul Newman (Road to Perdition), Ed Harris (Hours), Alfred Molina (Frida))
  3. 2008  (Heath Ledger (Dark Knight), Philip Seymour Hoffman (Doubt), Brad Pitt (Burn After Reading), Brendan Gleason (In Bruges), Robert Downey (Tropic Thunder))
  4. 2010  (Geoffrey Rush (King’s Speech), Christian Bale (Fighter), Mark Ruffalo (The Kids Are All Right), Andrew Garfield (Social Network), Pete Postlethwaite (Town))
  5. 2007  (Javier Bardem (No Country), Tom Wilkinson (Michael Clayton), Tommy Lee Jones (No Country), Philip Seymour Hoffman (Charlie Wilson’s War), Paul Dano (There Will Be Blood))

Years in Which the Worst of the Nominees Won the BAFTA:

  • 1975:  Fred Astaire (The Towering Inferno) over Jack Warden, Burgess Meredith, Martin Balsam
  • 1977:  Edward Fox (A Bridge Too Far) over Robert Duvall, Zero Mostel, Colin Blakely
  • 1986:  Ray McAnally (The Mission) over Denholm Elliott, Klaus Maria Bandeur, Simon Callow
  • 1989:  Ray McAnally (My Left Foot) over Jack Nicholson, Sean Connery, Marlon Brando
  • 1995:  Tim Roth (Rob Roy) over Martin Landau, Alan Rickman, Ian Holm
  • 1998:  Geoffrey Rush (Elizabeth) over Ed Harris, Geoffrey Rush, Tom Wilkinson

note:  Of these, the two McAnally performances are by far the best but are stuck in stronger years.

Kudos to the BAFTAs – the best performances nominated by the BAFTAs but no one else:

  1. Anthony Hopkins, The Lion in Winter, 1968
  2. Alan Rickman, Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, 1991
  3. Hugh Bonneville, Iris, 2001
  4. Jerry Lewis, King of Comedy, 1983
  5. Brad Pitt, Burn After Reading, 2008

The BAFTAs Being Different

  • Melvyn Douglas, Being There, 1979  –  Wins the Oscar, Globe, NYFC, LAFC.  No BAFTA nom.
  • John Gielgud, Arthur, 1981  –  Wins the Oscar, Globe, NYFC, LAFC.  In spite of being British, loses the BAFTA.
  • Jack Nicholson, Terms of Endearment, 1983  –  Wins six of the seven existing awards.  Fails to even get nominated at BAFTA.
  • Sean Connery, The Untouchables, 1987  –  Wins Oscar, Globe and NBR.  Loses BAFTA in spite of being Scottish.
  • Martin Landau, Ed Wood, 1994  –  Wins five critics awards, Oscar, Globe and the initial SAG award.  Loses BAFTA.
  • Tim Robbins, Mystic River, 2003  –  Wins Oscar, SAG, Globe, BFCA, CFC.  Loses BAFTA, losing chance to become first actor to sweep all five awards groups.
  • Thomas Haden Church, Sideways, 2004  –  Earns 396 points, fourth highest Consensus total to-date.  No BAFTA nom.
  • Christian Bale, The Fighter, 2010  –  Breaks what would have been a five year streak of actors sweeping the awards groups when Bale loses BAFTA to Geoffrey Rush.

The Golden Globes

Summary:

The Golden Globes, unlike the Oscars or BAFTAs started giving supporting awards from their first year.  The Globes felt free to go their own way with only one of the first four Globe winners and three of the first ten also winning the Oscar.  It wouldn’t be until 1949 that the Globes would start having nominees and not just winners and there wouldn’t be regular nominations in the category (as with most categories) until 1956.  Since then, in most years, there have been five nominees, with the exceptions of 1962 and 1963 when the limits in all categories seemed to be off and the occasional year when there would be six nominees (eight times from 1968 to 2003, including three straight years of 1988 to 1990).
Starting in the mid 50’s, agreements with the Oscars became more common (four times in six years) but then they went their separate ways for a while with four straight Globe winners in the mid 60’s who didn’t even earn Oscar noms.  But, since 1968 only once has a Globe winner failed to earn an Oscar nom (Richard Benjamin, The Sunshine Boys, 1975) and many actors win both.  It’s worth noting that three Oscar winners (Peter Ustinov, Topkapi, 1964; Walter Matthau, The Sunshine Boys, 1966; George Burns, The Sunshine Boys, 1975) earned nominations for Actor – Comedy and four other Oscar nominees have been nominated as leads at the Globes (two in each).  I won’t provide a list of all the nominees, but you can find one here.

Multiple Nominations:

Thirteen films have earned two nominations for Supporting Actor.  The first two to do so both lost both nominations (Spartacus, The Hustler) but the next three all won the award (The Sand Pebbles, They Shoot Horses Don’t They, Ryan’s Daughter).  Then there would be three more which would lose both (The Great Gatsby, Dog Day Afternoon, Julia) and two more that would win (Ordinary People, An Officer and a Gentleman).  Since then, three more films have lost both (Bugsy, The Departed, Tropic Thunder).  Of those 13, only four would also earn Oscar noms for both actors (The Hustler, Julia, Ordinary People, Bugsy).

Genres:

Drama dominates the award (over half of all the nominations and wins).  But every genre has had at least a touch.  Every genre has had at least one nomination (Fantasy has just one, Adventure, Kids and Sci-Fi have two each).  Fantasy, Adventure and Horror (five noms) are the only genres that have never won (Sci-Fi won in 1995 with Brad Pitt, 12 Monkeys).  Kids actually won both times it was nominated (Edmund Gwenn, The Miracle on 34th Street, 1947 and Richard Attenborough, 1967, Doctor Dolittle).  War has done the best, winning seven of its 13 nominations.

Best Picture:

Fifteen films have won the Globe for Picture and Supporting Actor (five in Comedy / Musical, ten in Drama) but Dreamgirls is the only film since Platoon in 1986 to do so.  Before that the longest gap was 1948 to 1959 but that was countered by four out of five years with winners matching.  In total, 46 films have won Picture and earned a Supporting Actor nom.  The longest streak of Picture winners without a Supporting Actor nom was 1987-90.  Another 100 films have been nominated for both Picture and Supporting Actor.  Almost half of Supporting Actor nominated films earned a Picture nom.  Given the number of Best Picture nominees at the Globes, it might be surprising that there are more years where none of the Supporting Actor nominees came from Picture nominees than at the Oscars (twice – 2001, 2008) and only once have all five nominees come from Picture nominees and that was in 1980 when two of the nominees were from Ordinary People.  There have also twice been sets of consecutive years with only one overlapping film each year (1987-88, 1995-96).

Foreign Films:

Like with the Oscars, there have been nominations in which the character spoke primarily a language other than English (Benicio del Toro in Traffic, who won and Ken Watanabe in The Last Samurai) but there have been no nominations from a Foreign language film.  Three films were Foreign Film nominated but they were all English language Foreign films (War and Peace, Tom Jones, Othello).

Single Nominations:

A whopping 81 films have earned one nomination for Supporting Actor and no other Globe nominations (plus Tropic Thunder which earned two).  Of those, 15 films actually won the Globe, a very high amount.  The only film to do this at the Globes and Oscars is Beginners.  It happened five times in the 50’s and at least once every decade since.

Other Categories:

Not surprisingly, by far Picture is the category most often nominated with Supporting Actor (146 times).  Supporting Actress is by far the fewest among the major categories (just 67 films have been nominated for both).  But among overlapping winners, it’s Actress that doesn’t go with Supporting Actor.  Only three films have won both awards (Cabaret, Ordinary People, Terms of Endearment), the same number of films that won both Supporting Actor and Song (Cabaret, Arthur, An Officer and a Gentleman).

The Golden Globes Top 8:

  1. Jack Nicholson  –  180
  2. Ed Harris  –  150
  3. Edmund Gwenn  –  120
  4. Edmond O’Brien  –  120
  5. Richard Attenborough  –  120
  6. Red Buttons  –  120
  7. Martin Landau  –  120
  8. sixteen actors  –  90

note:  Wins are worth 60 points and nominations are worth 30.
note:  Nicholson and Harris have one win each.  Of the other five, only Buttons doesn’t have two wins (he has a win and two other noms).

Top 5 Globe Winners:

  1. Gene Hackman  (Unforgiven)
  2. Martin Landau  (Ed Wood)
  3. Denzel Washington  (Glory)
  4. Walter Huston  (Treasure of the Sierra Madre)
  5. Heath Ledger  (The Dark Knight)

Worst 5 Globe Winners:

  1. Richard Attenborough  (Doctor Dolittle)
  2. Stephen Boyd  (Ben Hur)
  3. Earl Holliman  (The Rainmaker)
  4. Edmond O’Brien  (Seven Days in May)
  5. Oskar Werner  (The Spy Who Came in from the Cold)

Worst 5 Globe Nominees:

  1. Scott Wilson  (The Ninth Configuration)
  2. Steven Bauer  (Scarface)
  3. Neil Patrick Harris  (Clara’s Heart)
  4. Richard Attenborough  (Doctor Dolittle)
  5. Bruce Dern  (The Great Gatsby)

10 Best Performances Not Nominated for the Globe:

  1. Kevin Kline  (A Fish Called Wanda)
  2. Mandy Patinken  (The Princess Bride)
  3. Michael Sheen  (The Queen)
  4. Robert De Niro  (The Godfather Part II)
  5. Anthony Hopkins  (The Lion in Winter)
  6. Kevin Spacey  (L.A. Confidential)
  7. Henry Fonda  (Once Upon a Time in the West)
  8. Gene Hackman  (Bonnie and Clyde)
  9. Sterling Hayden  (Dr. Strangelove)
  10. Sean Astin  (The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King)

5 Most Acclaimed Performances to not Win the Globe (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. Jason Robards, All the President’s Men, 1976
  2. Ralph Fiennes, Schindler’s List, 1993
  3. Kevin Spacey, The Usual Suspects, 1995
  4. Joe Pesci, Raging Bull, 1980
  5. Joe Pesci, GoodFellas, 1990

5 Least Acclaimed Performance to Win the Globe (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. Richard Benjamin, The Sunshine Boys, 1975
  2. Brad Pitt, 12 Monkeys, 1995
  3. Tom Berenger, Platoon, 1986
  4. Peter Firth, Equus, 1977
  5. Richard Attenborough, Doctor Dolittle, 1967

note:  Unlike the Oscars, there is overlap here in 1995 where the Globe make the surprise choice over the consensus choice.

5 Most Acclaimed Performances to not earn a Globe nomination (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. Hugh Griffith, Ben Hur, 1959
  2. Dean Stockwell, Married to the Mob, 1988
  3. John Malkovich, Places in the Heart, 1984
  4. John Lithgow, The World According to Garp, 1982
  5. Gene Hackman, Bonnie and Clyde, 1967

note:  I won’t do a least acclaimed for this because it’s just going to be five very recent performances that earned no other nominations, since there are so many points available nowadays.

Top 5 Globe Years:

  1. 1994  (Martin Landau (Ed Wood), Samuel L. Jackson (Pulp Fiction), John Turturro (Quiz Show), Gary Sinise (Forrest Gump), Kevin Bacon (The River Wild))
  2. 1986  (Tom Berenger (Platoon), Dennis Hopper (Blue Velvet, Hoosiers), Michael Caine (Hannah and Her Sisters), Ray Liotta (Something Wild))
  3. 1998  (Ed Harris (The Truman Show), Bill Murray (Rushmore), Donald Sutherland (Without Limits), Geoffrey Rush (Shakespeare in Love), Billy Bob Thornton (A Simple Plan), Robert Duvall (A Civil Action))
  4. 1993  (Tommy Lee Jones (The Fugitive), Ralph Fiennes (Schindler’s List), John Malkovich (In the Line of Fire), Leonardo DiCaprio (What’s Eating Gilbert Grape), Sean Penn (Carlito’s Way))
  5. 1950  (Edmund Gwenn (Mister 880), Erich von Stroheim (Sunset Blvd.), George Sanders (All About Eve))

Worst 5 Globe Years:

  1. 1958  (Burl Ives (The Big Country), Gig Young (Teacher’s Pet), Harry Guardino (Houseboat), David Ladd (The Proud Rebel), Efrem Zimbalist Jr (Home Before Dark))
  2. 1965  (Oskar Werner (The Spy Who Came in from the Cold), Frank Finlay (Othello), Hardy Kruger (The Flight of the Phoenix), Telly Savalas (Battle of the Bulge), Red Buttons (Harlow))
  3. 1968  (Daniel Massey (Star!), Ossie Davis (The Scalphunters), Hugh Griffith (Oliver!), Beau Bridges (For Love of Ivy), Martin Sheen (The Subject Was Roses))
  4. 1985  (Klaus Maria Brandeur (Out of Africa), Eric Stoltz (Mask), Eric Roberts (Runaway Train), John Lone (Year of the Dragon), Joel Grey (Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins))
  5. 1971  (Ben Johnson (The Last Picture Show), Art Garfunkel (Carnal Knowledge), Jan-Michael Vincent (Going Home), Paul Mann (Fiddler on the Roof), Tom Baker (Nicholas and Alexandra))

note:  Wikipedia claims that Hugh Griffith was nominated for The Fixer in 1968.  The IMDb says that Griffith was nominated for both The Fixer and Oliver.  But the Globes official site only lists a nomination for Oliver.

Top 5 Films to win the Globe (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. Lawrence of Arabia
  2. West Side Story
  3. Treasure of the Sierra Madre
  4. Ed Wood
  5. Glory

Worst 5 Films to win the Globe  (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. Doctor Dolittle
  2. The Towering Inferno
  3. Primal Fear
  4. The Cardinal
  5. The Razor’s Edge

Worst 5 Films to earn a Globe nomination (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. Butterfly
  2. The Ninth Configuration
  3. Doctor Dolittle
  4. Cleopatra
  5. Love Story

Years in Which the Worst of the Nominees Won the Globe:

  • 1950:  Edmund Gwenn (Mister 880) over Erich von Stroheim, George Sanders
  • 1967:  Richard Attenborough (Doctor Dolittle) over Michael J. Pollard, George Kennedy, John Cassavetes, Efrem Zimbalist Jr

Kudos to the Globes – the best performances nominated by the Globes but no one else

  1. Donald Sutherland, Without Limits, 1998
  2. Trevor Howard, Ryan’s Daughter, 1970
  3. Jude Law, A.I., 2001
  4. John Cazale, Dog Day Afternoon, 1975
  5. Sean Penn, Carlito’s Way, 1993

We Agree on the Film but Not the Performance – films that earned Oscar and Globe noms for different performers

note:  Only listed if they nominated different performers in the same category.  So, for example, The Sunshine Boys (Richard Benjamin won the Globe, George Burns won the Oscar) doesn’t count because Burns was nominated at the Globes in the lead.

  • 1959:  Hugh Griffith wins Oscar, Stephen Boyd wins Globe (Ben Hur)
  • 1959:  George C. Scott, Arthur O’Connell nominated for Oscar, Joseph N. Welch nominated for Globe  (Anatomy of a Murder)
  • 1965:  Ian Bannen nominated for Oscar, Hardy Kruger nominated for Globe  (The Flight of the Phoenix)
  • 1968:  Jack Albertson wins the Oscar, Martin Sheen nominated for Globe  (The Subject Was Roses)
  • 1968:  Jack Wild nominated for Oscar, Hugh Griffith nominated for Globe  (Oliver!)
  • 1969:  Rupert Crose nominated for Oscar, Mitch Vogel nominated for Globe  (The Reivers)
  • 1971:  Leonard Frey nominated for Oscar, Paul Mann nominated for Globe  (Fiddler on the Roof)
  • 1973:  Jason Miller nominated for Oscar, Max von Sydow nominated for Globe  (The Exorcist)
  • 1975:  Chris Sarandon nominated for Oscar, Charles Durning and John Cazale nominated for Globe  (Dog Day Afternoon)
  • 1991:  Michael Lerner nominated for Oscar, John Goodman nominated for Globe  (Barton Fink)
  • 1994:  Paul Scofield nominated for Oscar, John Turturro nominated for Globe  (Quiz Show)

The Broadcast Film Critics Awards  (Critics Choice)

Summary:

The Supporting Actor award was one of the initial BFCA Awards that began in 1995.  That award was split in a major way with the award going to both Ed Harris (Apollo 13 / Nixon) and Kevin Spacey (The Usual Suspects / Seven / Swimming with Sharks).  They clearly were taking the approach that critics awards did and that continued in 1998 when Billy Bob Thornton won for both Primary Colors and A Simple Plan and 2000 when Joaquin Phoenix won for Gladiator, Quills and The Yards.  While Harris won SAG and Spacey won the Oscar and the second winner, Cuba Gooding (Jerry Maguire) won both, the next five winners failed to win either award (or the Globe) though several of them won critics awards.  But, since 2002 the only winner not to win either the SAG or Oscar was the Consensus winner (Thomas Haden Church, Sideways, 2004).
For the first six years there were no nominees, simply a winner (often for multiple films).  But, starting in 2001, they expanded to three nominees.  That was followed by moving to five nominees in 2003 and, with a couple of exceptions, six nominees starting in 2005.  It took until 2004 before the BFCA nominated someone with no other nominations (in 2004, Peter Sarsgaard for Kinsey) and since then, with starts and gaps, it has remained at about an average of one per year.
There is no point in doing a BFCA points list because through 2011, no one has more than 60 points.  There have been 18 winners and two actors who have earned two nominations without a win (Philip Seymour Hoffman, Alfred Molina).

  • Lowest Critical Acclaim for a BFCA Winner:  Anthony Hopkins, Amistad, 1997
  • Highest Critical Acclaim for a BFCA nominee:  Jim Broadbent, Iris, 2001
  • Lowest Critical Acclaim for a BFCA nominee:  Peter Sarsgaard, Kinsey, 2004
  • Highest Critical Acclaim for a BFCA snub:  Benicio del Toro, Traffic, 2000
  • Highest Critical Acclaim for a BFCA snub (post-2000, when nominations began):  Christopher Walken, Catch Me if You Can, 2002
  • Best Performance by a BFCA snub:  Michael Sheen, The Queen, 2006
  • Best BFCA Nominee Not Nominated by Any Other Group:  Peter Sarsgaard, Kinsey, 2004
  • Worst BFCA Winner:  Joaquin Phoenix, Gladiator / Quills / The Yards, 2000

The Screen Actors Guild

Summary:

The SAG Awards began in 1994, rather late in the game for guild awards.  That first year, they were very similar to the Oscars, with the same winner and four of the same nominees (the fifth nominee for each was from the same film).  But the next year they disagreed on the winner and in 1995 and 1996 only two SAG nominees each earned Oscar noms.  It would be the last of the acting categories to have a year match 5 for 5 and that was really 5 for 6 because it was 2000 when the SAG winner for Actor won the Oscar for Supporting Actor.  It would take until 2006, the year that SAG and Oscars matched perfectly in all four categories for them to agree again.  SAG also goes less for the same actors as only Chris Cooper has managed more than two nominations (two of those didn’t earn him Oscar noms and the third won him the Oscar but not SAG).  In the early years, SAG often went its own route.  Through 2004, nine times an actor earned a SAG nomination and nothing else.  Since then, that has only happened once (Armie Hammer, J. Edgar, 2011).

  • Lowest Critical Acclaim for a SAG Winner:  Robert Duvall, A Civil Action, 1998
  • Highest Critical Acclaim for a SAG nominee:  Kevin Spacey, The Usual Suspects, 1995
  • Lowest Critical Acclaim for a SAG nominee:  Chris Cooper, Seabiscuit, 2003
  • Highest Critical Acclaim for a SAG snub:  Edward Norton, Primal Fear, 1996
  • Best Performance by a SAG snub:  Michael Sheen, The Queen, 2006
  • Best SAG Nominee Not Nominated by Any Other Group:  Kenneth Branagh, Othello, 1995
  • Worst SAG Winner:  Robert Duvall, A Civil Action, 1998

The SAG Top 4:

  1. Benicio del Toro  –  100
  2. Ed Harris  –  90
  3. Chris Cooper  –  90
  4. Christopher Plummer  –  90

note:  Del Toro has 100 because he won Actor for Traffic.  Cooper has three nominations but the other three have one win and one nomination each.

The Critics Awards

Summary:

Though the National Board of Review and New York Film Critics had both begun in the 30’s, neither would establish a Supporting award for quite a while.  The NBR would be first, starting in 1954 and they would continue the tradition that both groups had used in other awards of rewarding a year’s worth of work rather an individual film.  The first award went to John Williams for Sabrina and Dial M for Murder.  It would take until 1957 for an Oscar nominee to win the award and until 1959 for an Oscar winner to win.  But most of the early NBR winners weren’t nominated for either the Globe or the Oscar.  The National Society of Film Critics were established in 1966 and began giving supporting awards the next year, awarding Gene Hackman for Bonnie and Clyde.  Two years later, Jack Nicholson (Easy Rider) won the initial NYFC Award and also won the NSFC making him the first to win two awards.
1971 seemed to be a turning point for the NBR.  Before that, only five of the first seventeen winners earned Oscar noms and only two won both awards (Melvn Douglas, Hud, 1963 was the other).  But, starting in 1971, when Ben Johnson became the first person to win both the NBR and NYFC (and the first to win five total awards) that changed.  In the 40 years since, only seven NBR winners have failed to earn an Oscar nom and only one since 1989 (Philip Seymour Hoffman, Magnolia / Talented Mr. Ripley, 1999).  Jason Robards (All the President’s Men, 1976) became the first to win all three critics awards a year before the LA Film Critics started giving their own awards.  The Boston Society of Film Critics began their own awards in 1980.  In 1983, Jack Nicholson (Terms of Endearment) became the first to win all five critics awards.  The Chicago Film Critics would make it six critics groups starting in 1988 but through 2011, no actor has swept all six awards.  Three actors have won five of the awards with the NBR being the lone hold out for Martin Landau (Ed Wood, 1994) and Christoph Waltz (Inglourious Basterds, 2009) and the NYFC the hold out against Thomas Haden Church (Sideways, 2004).

Multiple Wins:

Only two actors have won the award from every group.  The first is Jack Nicholson who was won three NBR, two NYFC, NSFC and BSFC and one each of the LAFC and CFC.  The other is Joe Pesci who won the NYFC and NSFC for Raging Bull, the same two groups that didn’t give him the award for GoodFellas (he won the NBR for both as well).

Multiple Films:

This has been a consistent mark of all the critics groups except the Chicago Film Critics for this award but the groups don’t always agree.  It also can lead to some confusion and hesitation among film studios as to what to promote.  For instance, in 1986, Dennis Hopper won the LAFC for both Blue Velvet and Hoosiers but won the NSFC and BSFC just for Blue Velvet (he was Globe nominated for both) but it was Hoosiers that earned the Oscar nom.  In 2001, in spite of the Best Picture nomination for Moulin Rouge, Jim Broadbent earned his Oscar for Iris (he won the NBR and LAFC for both).  And the groups don’t always agree.  In 1995, Kevin Spacey won the NYFC for The Usual Suspects, Seven, Swimming with Sharks and Outbreak, he won the NBR for just The Usual Suspects and Seven and the BSFC and CFC just for Usual Suspects.

Foreign Films:

Four Foreign language performances have won awards.  Holger Löwenadler won both the NSFC and the NBR for Lacombe Lucien (1974).  Charles Boyer won the NYFC, also in 1974, for Stavisky.  More recently, the LAFC have twice given the award to Foreign performances (Vlad Ivanov, 4 Months 3 Weeks and Two Days, 2007; Niels Arestrup, A Prophet, 2010).

Other Awards:

The NBR, which has the longest history, also has the highest likelihood of giving the award without giving the film any other awards.  In almost 60 years, 20 films have won the award while winning no other awards, either from the NBR or any other group.  This also speaks to the Consensus Awards.  Seven of the NBR winners in the 60’s earned no other awards at the Consensus Awards.  On average, one NYFC winner per decade earns no other Consensus points and the NSFC has about the same rate.  From 1980 to 1997, only one BSFC winner failed to earn any other points (Ian Holm in 1985) but then it happened three times from 1998 to 2002.  However, in the whole history of the CFC, only Mickey Rourke (Sin City, 2005) failed to earn any other Consensus points and in the even longer history of the LAFC, only Vlad Ivanov failed to earn any other Consensus points.

The Critics Top 10:

  1. Jack Nicholson  –  588
  2. Martin Landau  –  384
  3. Joe Pesci  –  372
  4. Gene Hackman  –  282
  5. Christoph Waltz  –  276
  6. Christopher Plummer  –  276
  7. Kevin Spacey  –  264
  8. Thomas Haden Church  –  264
  9. John Gielgud  –  234
  10. Burt Reynolds  –  222

Best by Group

  • NYFC:  Ralph Fiennes  (Schindler’s List, 1993)
  • LAFC:  Gene Hackman  (Unforgiven, 1992)
  • NSFC:  Al Pacino  (The Godfather, 1972)  *
  • BSFC:  Ralph Fiennes  (Schindler’s List, 1993)
  • CFC:  Ralph Fiennes  (Schindler’s List, 1993)
  • NBR:  Al Pacino  (The Godfather, 1972)

note:  Pacino actually won for Actor.  If you don’t want to count it, it’s Fiennes again.

Worst by Group

  • NYFC:  Charles Boyer  (Stavisky, 1974)
  • LAFC:  John Lithgow  (The World According to Garp, 1982)  *
  • NSFC:  Edward Fox  (A Bridge Too Far, 1977)
  • BSFC:  Mickey Rourke  (Diner, 1982)
  • CFC:  Mickey Rourke  (Sin City, 2005)
  • NBR:  Charles Bickford  (Not as a Stranger, 1955)

note:  I don’t count performances when there are multiple performances cited.  For instance, I rank Bill Murray’s performance in Wild Things lower than Lithgow’s, but since Murray was also cited for Rushmore, I won’t knock the extra film I feel the critics threw in there.

10 Best Performances that Didn’t Win any Critics Award (post-1967):

  1. Ian McKellen  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, 2001)
  2. Alec Guinness  (Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, 1977)
  3. Denzel Washington  (Glory, 1989)
  4. Robert Duvall  (Apocalypse Now, 1979)
  5. Kevin Kline  (A Fish Called Wanda, 1988)
  6. William H. Macy  (Fargo, 1996)
  7. Mandy Patinkin  (The Princess Bride, 1987)
  8. Robert De Niro  (The Godfather Part II, 1974)
  9. Anthony Hopkins  (The Lion in Winter, 1968)
  10. Henry Fonda  (Once Upon a Time in the West, 1969)

5 Most Acclaimed Post-1967 Performances to not Win a Critics Award (based on Consensus Awards percentage):

  1. John Mills, 1970, Ryan’s Daughter
  2. Haing S. Ngor, 1984, The Killing Fields
  3. Robert Duvall, 1979, Apocalypse Now
  4. Fred Astaire, 1974, The Towering Inferno
  5. George Kennedy, 1967, Cool Hand Luke

note:  Originally, the list was all from the stretch from 1954 to 1966 when only the NBR gave out awards so I made it only after the NSFC added a second award (and added more total Consensus points).

Least Acclaimed Performances to Win the Critics by Group

  • NYFC:  Eugene Levy  (A Mighty Wind, 2003)
  • LAFC:  Vlad Ivanov  (4 Months 3 Weeks and 2 Days, 2007)
  • NSFC:  Eddie Marsan  (Happy-Go-Lucky, 2008)
  • BSFC:  Fred Willard  (Best in Show, 2000)
  • CFC:  Mickey Rourke  (Sin City, 2005)
  • NBR:  Philip Seymour Hoffman  (Magnolia / The Talented Mr. Ripley, 1999)

note:  Basically, because of the larger total amount of Consensus points the more recent you get, these are all the most recent examples of a winner with no other Consensus points.

Most Critically Acclaimed Performance Snubbed by a Critics Group:

  • NYFC:  Heath Ledger  (The Dark Knight, 2008)
  • LAFC:  Ralph Fiennes  (Schindler’s List, 1993)
  • NSFC:  Heath Ledger  (The Dark Knight, 2008)
  • BSFC:  Joe Pesci  (Raging Bull, 1980)
  • CFC:  Gene Hackman  (Unforgiven, 1992)
  • NBR:  Gene Hackman  (Unforgiven, 1992)

Critical Oddities:

note:  These are the performances that won multiple Critics Awards but failed to earn nominations from any of the awards groups.  Except for Daniel Day-Lewis (who came in 3rd), they all came in 2nd at the Consensus.

  • Christopher Plummer  (The Insider, 1999)
    • LAFC, NSFC, BSFC
  • Robert De Niro  (Mean Streets / Bang the Drum Slowly, 1973)
    • NYFC, NSFC
  • Holger Lowenadler  (Lacombe Lucien, 1974)
    • NSFC, NBR
  • Mickey Rourke  (Diner, 1982)
    • NSFC, BSFC
  • Daniel Day-Lewis  (My Beautiful Laundrette, A Room with a View, 1986)
    • NYFC, NBR

Going First Has Disadvantages – The NBR Being Different:

  • 1991  –  The NBR gives Supporting Actor to Anthony Hopkins for Silence of the Lambs before the other groups decide he’s a lead.
  • 1992  –  Jack Nicholson wins for A Few Good Men before Gene Hackman sweeps almost all other awards (except CFC) for Unforgiven.
  • 1994  –  Gary Sinise wins for Forrest Gump while the other five critics groups (and the Oscar, Globe and SAG) go to Martin Landau for Ed Wood.
  • 2007 / 2008  –  Javier Bardem and Heath Ledger both fail to win the NBR, one of only two critics groups that each fail to win.
  • 2009  –  Becomes the only group not to give an award to Christoph Waltz, instead awarding Woody Harrelson for The Messenger.

The Nighthawk Awards

note:  Because my awards go, retroactively, all the way back through 1912, there are a lot more nominees and winners than in the other awards.  But I don’t always have a full slate of nominees and some years I don’t have any nominees.

Multiple Nominations:

The Godfather is the king, with four nominees (and the win).  Three films earn three nominations and all also win: Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, On the Waterfront, The Godfather Part II.  There are 16 more that win the Nighthawk and earn a second nomination, all of which at least earn a Best Picture nomination except Thirteen Days.

Directors:

David Lean is on top here.  His films have earned 450 points with 12 nominated performances from 8 different films with three of them winning (Sesue Hayakawa, Omar Sharif, Tom Courteney).  He’s followed by Francis Ford Coppola (390 points, 10 nominees from 5 films, 3 wins – Pacino, De Niro, Duvall) and Martin Scorsese (360 points, 9 nominees from 8 films, wins for De Niro and Pesci (twice)).  After that, there are 270 points each for William Wyler, Sidney Lumet and Akira Kurosawa as well as 240 each for Billy Wilder, Alan J. Pakula and Elia Kazan.  Amazingly enough, the only directors to direct consecutive winners are Archie Mayo (1936, 1937) and Michael Curtiz (1942, 1943).

Sequels:

A number of sequels earn nominations so what makes the performances of Sean Astin and Andy Serkis in Return of the King different?  That’s because they are the only two performers reprising roles to earn nominations.  For all other sequel performances that earn nominations (like, say, Robert De Niro in The Godfather Part II or Heath Ledger in The Dark Knight), they weren’t in the previous films.

Genres:

Drama accounts for almost exactly half of all the nominations (194 films out of 390).  Kids is the only genre without at least three nominations (it has two) and is also the only genre without a win.  Drama has the most wins with the only drought of more than 6 years coming from 1985 to 1993.  Crime (1972-74) is the only other genre to have more than a two year win streak.

Best Picture:

Of the 390 films nominated for Supporting Actor, 56 of them win Best Picture (out of 85 total) and 119 more are Picture nominees.  The longest streak of Picture winners with a Supporting Actor nomination is 1950-57 and the longest drought is 1933-37.  From 1950 to 1954, there are five straight films that win both Picture and Supporting Actor.  The only year where no Supporting Actor nominees come from Picture nominees is 1933.  In 1972 all the Supporting Actor nominees come from Picture nominees but four of them are from The Godfather.

Foreign Film:

There are 26 Foreign films that at least earn a Nighthawk nomination for Supporting Actor.  Seven of those films win the Nighthawk including three Toshiro Mifune performances (Rashomon, The Seven Samurai, High and Low).  Erich von Stroheim wins the Nighthawk for a Foreign performance (The Grand Illusion) and then later wins one in English (Sunset Blvd).

Single Nominations:

There are 48 films that earn a Supporting Actor nomination and no other nominations.  Of those 48, only one of them wins the Nighthawk: Alan Rickman for Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991).

Other Categories:

Aside from Animated Film (no overlap), the categories least likely to overlap with Supporting Actor are Foreign Film (25), Song (32) and Visual Effects (33).  It’s most likely to overlap with Picture (176), Director (167), Supporting Actress (142) and Actor (137).

My Top 10

  1. Claude Rains  –  390
  2. Gene Hackman  –  210
  3. Toshiro Mifune  –  180
  4. Alec Guinness  –  180
  5. Jack Nicholson  –  180
  6. Charles Laughton  –  150
  7. Erich von Stroheim  –  150
  8. Robert Ryan  –  150
  9. Robert De Niro  –  150
  10. Jason Robards  /  Michael Caine  –  150

My Top 10 Drama

  1. Claude Rains  –  390
  2. Toshiro Mifune  –  210
  3. Gene Hackman  –  180
  4. Jack Nicholson  –  180
  5. Charles Laughton  –  150
  6. Thomas Mitchell  –  150
  7. Erich von Stroheim  –  150
  8. Robert De Niro  –  150
  9. Robert Duvall  –  150
  10. Alec Guinness  /  Ian Holm  –  150

My Top 10 Comedy

  1. Edward Everett Horton  –  180
  2. William Demarest  –  150
  3. Michael Caine  –  150
  4. Philip Seymour Hoffman  –  150
  5. Bill Murray  –  150
  6. John Mills  –  120
  7. Gene Wilder  –  120
  8. Jack Warden  –  120
  9. 16 actors  –  90

My Top 10 Weighted Points

  1. Claude Rains  –  469
  2. Alec Guinness  –  292
  3. Ian Holm  –  236
  4. Jack Nicholson  –  236
  5. Toshiro Mifune  –  232
  6. Michael Caine  –  232
  7. Gene Hackman  –  228
  8. Thomas Mitchell  –  210
  9. Philip Seymour Hoffman  –  209
  10. Robert Ryan  /  Robert Duvall  –  208

note:  This based on a scale from 20-1 based on Top 20 placement at the Nighthawks.  A win is worth 60 points in Supporting Actor, a 20th place finish is worth 1 point (if the list goes a full 20).

My Top 10 Absolute Points List:

  1. Claude Rains  –  470
  2. Michael Caine  –  470
  3. Philip Seymour Hoffman  –  408
  4. Alec Guinness  –  350
  5. Ian Holm  –  343
  6. Robert Duvall  –  321
  7. Alan Rickman  –  319
  8. Ian McKellen  –  305
  9. Morgan Freeman  –  298
  10. Jack Nicholson  –  290

note:  This is a point scale based on their performance points, not where they finished in the year.  It benefits someone like Alan Rickman who had ten Top 10 finishes over the years (all in strong years) but only earned three Nighthawk nominations.  Denholm Elliott (290) and Gene Hackman (282) are just off the list.

Top Absolute Points by Decade:

1912-1929

  1. Conrad Veidt  –  45
  2. Henry B. Walthall  –  45
  3. Max Schreck  –  45

1930-1939

  1. Claude Rains  –  164
  2. Thomas Mitchell  –  112
  3. Charles Laughton  –  105
  4. Boris Karloff  –  89
  5. Edward Everett Horton  –  83

1940-1949

  1. Claude Rains  –  276
  2. Walter Huston  –  141
  3. Charles Coburn  –  127
  4. Clifton Webb  –  104
  5. Kirk Douglas  –  97

1950-1959

  1. Toshiro Mifune  –  134
  2. Karl Malden  –  134
  3. Lee J. Cobb  –  134
  4. Arthur Kennedy  –  112
  5. Orson Welles  –  112

1960-1969

  1. Toshiro Mifune  –  135
  2. Alec Guinness  –  134
  3. Peter Ustinov  –  134
  4. Tom Courteney  –  105
  5. Anthony Quayle  –  97

1970-1979

  1. Robert Duvall  –  246
  2. Jack Warden  –  186
  3. Robert De Niro  –  156
  4. John Cazale  –  135
  5. Jason Robards  –  134

1980-1989

  1. Denholm Elliott  –  201
  2. Denzel Washington  –  172
  3. Daniel Day-Lewis  –  150
  4. Michael Caine  –  149
  5. Morgan Freeman  –  142

1990-1999

  1. Alan Rickman  –  193
  2. William H. Macy  –  171
  3. Kevin Spacey  –  164
  4. Ed Harris  –  156
  5. Harvey Keitel  –  149

2000-2011

  1. Philip Seymour Hoffman  –  245
  2. Jim Broadbent  –  180
  3. Michael Caine  –  179
  4. Chris Cooper  –  179
  5. Peter Sarsgaard  /  George Clooney  –  164

Years in Which an Actor Exceeded 100 Absolute Points:

  • Peter Ustinov  –  1960  –  112  (Spartacus  /  The Sundowners  /  Lola Montes)
  • Tom Courteney  –  1965  –  105  (Doctor Zhivago  /  King Rat)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis  –  1986  –  120  (My Beautiful Laundrette  /  A Room with a View)
  • Michael Caine  –  1986  –  119  (Hannah and Her Sisters  /  Mona Lisa)
  • Dennis Hopper  –  1986  –  104  (Blue Velvet  /  Hoosiers)
  • Edward Norton  –  1996  –  119  (Primal Fear  /  The People vs. Larry Flynt  /  Everyone Says I Love You)
  • Bill Nighy  –  2003  –  104  (Love Actually  /  Lawless Heart  /  I Capture the Castle)
  • George Clooney  –  2005  –  105  (Syriana  /  Good Night and Good Luck)

Top 5 Films to win the Nighthawk (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. Sunset Blvd.
  2. The Godfather
  3. Rashomon
  4. The Grand Illusion
  5. GoodFellas

Worst 5 Films to win the Nighthawk (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. Out of Africa
  2. The Barretts of Wimpole Street
  3. I Never Sang for My Father
  4. Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves
  5. Laura

Worst 5 Films to earn a Nighthawk nomination  (based on quality of film not the performance):

  1. A Free Soul
  2. Primal Fear
  3. The Razor’s Edge
  4. Quo Vadis
  5. Anthony Adverse

Top 20 Films for Supporting Actor (total of all performances on my list):

  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, 2003  (Sean Astin, Andy Serkis, David Wenham, Billy Boyd, Ian McKellen)
  2. The Godfather, 1972  (Al Pacino, Robert Duvall, James Caan, Richard Castellano, Abe Vigoda)
  3. The Princess Bride, 1987  (Mandy Patinkin, Peter Falk, Wallace Shawn, Chris Sarandon, Christopher Guest)
  4. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, 2001  (Ian McKellen, Ian Holm, Christopher Lee, Hugo Weaving, Viggo Mortensen)
  5. The Godfather Part II, 1974  (Robert De Niro, Michael Gazzo, Robert Duvall, Lee Strasberg, John Cazale)
  6. The Dark Knight, 2008  (Heath Ledger, Gary Oldman, Aaron Eckhart, Michael Caine)
  7. The Departed, 2006  (Mark Wahlberg, Jack Nicholson, Martin Sheen, Alec Baldwin)
  8. Lawrence of Arabia, 1962  (Omar Sharif, Arthur Kennedy, Jack Hawkins, Anthony Quayle, Alec Guinness)
  9. On the Waterfront, 1954  (Karl Malden, Lee J. Cobb, Rod Steiger)
  10. Ragtime, 1981  (Howard Rollins Jr, Mandy Patinkin, Brad Dourif, James Cagney)
  11. Thirteen Days, 2000  (Bruce Greenwood, Steven Culp, Dylan Baker)
  12. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, 2002  (Andy Serkis, David Wenham, Brad Dourif, Bernard Hill, Ian McKellen)
  13. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, 1977  (Alec Guinness, Peter Cushing, James Earl Jones)
  14. The Lion in Winter, 1968  (Anthony Hopkins, John Castle, Timothy Dalton)
  15. A Room with a View, 1986  (Denholm Elliott, Daniel Day-Lewis, Simon Callow)
  16. Milk, 2008  (Emile Hirsch, Josh Brolin, James Franco)
  17. Mr. Roberts, 1955  (Jack Lemmon, James Cagney, William Powell)
  18. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, 1939  (Claude Rains, Thomas Mitchell, Harey Carey)
  19. Terms of Endearment, 1983  (Jack Nicholson, Jeff Daniels, John Lithgow)
  20. Presumed Innocent, 1990  (John Spencer, Raul Julia, Brian Dennehy, Paul Winfield)

note:  Regarding all three Lord of the Rings films and the first two Godfather films – because the category only has five nominees, I will only list a maximum of five performances for a film.  All five of those films could actually have had more than five listed.

Nighthawk Notables:

  • Best Line (dramatic):  “Some men aren’t looking for anything logical.  They can’t be bought, bullied, reasoned or negotiated with.  Some men just want to watch the world burn.”  (Michael Caine in The Dark Knight)
  • Best Line (comedic):  “Hello.  My name is Inigo Montoya.  You killed my father.  Prepare to die.”  (Mandy Patinkin in The Princess Bride)
  • Funniest Performance:  Kevin Kline, A Fish Called Wanda, 1988
  • Coolest Performance:  Harrison Ford, Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, 1977
  • Best Villain:  Ralph Fiennes, Schindler’s List, 1993
  • Best Hero:  IanMcKellen, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, 2001
  • Best President:  Bruce Greenwood, Thirteen Days, 2000
  • Best Future King:  Anthony Hopkins, The Lion in Winter, 1968
  • Best Monster:  Boris Karloff, Frankenstein, 1931/1932
  • Best Animated Performance:  Robin Williams, Aladdin, 1992
  • Best Non-Animated Voiceover Performance:  James Earl Jones, Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, 1977
  • Best Motion-Capture Performance:  Andy Serkis, The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, 2002
  • Sexiest Performance:  George Chakiris, West Side Story, 1961

Top 5 Shakespeare Performances (original Shakespeare language):

  1. Michael Keaton, Much Ado About Nothing, 1993
  2. Kenneth Branagh, Othello, 1995
  3. Denzel Washington, Much Ado About Nothing, 1993
  4. Frank Finlay, Othello, 1965
  5. Ben Kingsley, Twelfth Night, 1996

Top 5 Dickens Performances:

  1. Alec Guinness, Oliver Twist, 1948/1951
  2. Frances L. Sullivan, Great Expectations, 1946/1947
  3. Alec Guinness, Little Dorrit, 1988
  4. Robert Newton, Oliver Twist, 1948/1951
  5. Lon Chaney, Oliver Twist, 1922/1926

Top 5 Godfather Performances:

  1. Al Pacino, The Godfather, 1972
  2. Robert De Niro, The Godfather Part II, 1974
  3. Robert Duvall, The Godfather, 1972
  4. Andy Garcia, The Godfather Part III, 1990
  5. James Caan, The Godfather, 1972

Top 3 Comic Book Villains:

  1. Heath Ledger, The Joker, The Dark Knight, 2008
  2. Aaron Eckhart, Two-Face, The Dark Knight, 2008
  3. Gene Hackman, Lex Luthor, Superman, 1978

Top 3 Comic Book Supporting Characters:

  1. Gary Oldman, Jim Gordon, The Dark Knight, 2008
  2. Michael Caine, Alfred, The Dark Knight, 2008
  3. Gary Oldman, Jim Gordon, Batman Begins, 2005

Top 5 Harry Potter Performances:

  1. David Thewliss, Prisoner of Azkaban, 2004
  2. Robbie Coltrane, Sorcerer’s Stone, 2001
  3. Alan Rickman, Deathly Hallows Part II, 2011
  4. Gary Oldman, Prisoner of Azkaban, 2004
  5. Kenneth Branagh, Chamber of Secrets, 2002

Top 5 Lord of the Rings Performances:

  1. Ian McKellen, Fellowship of the Ring, 2001
  2. Sean Astin, Return of the King, 2003
  3. Andy Serkis, Two Towers, 2002
  4. Andy Serkis, Return of the King, 2003
  5. Ian Holm, Fellowship of the Ring, 2001

Top 3 Performances of Actors as other Actors:

  1. Martin Landau as Bela Lugosi, Ed Wood, 1994
  2. Kenneth Branagh as Laurence Olivier, My Week with Marilyn, 2011
  3. Willem DaFoe as Max Schreck, Shadow of the Vampire, 2000

The Full List of Nighthawk Winners and What Other Awards They Won or Were Nominated For

  • 1912-26:  Donald Crisp, Broken Blossoms
  • 1927-28:  William Powell, The Last Command
  • 1928-29:  Max Schreck, Nosferatu
  • 1929-30:  Albert Steinruck, Asphalt
  • 1930-31:  Harry Myers, City Lights
  • 1931-32:  Boris Karloff, Frankenstein
  • 1932-33:  John Barrymore, Dinner at Eight
  • 1934:  Charles Laughton, The Barretts of Wimpole Street
  • 1935:  Charles Laughton, Les Miserables
  • 1936:  Humphrey Bogart, The Petrified Forest
  • 1937:  Eric Blore, It’s Love I’m After
  • 1938:  Erich von Stroheim, The Grand Illusion
  • 1939:  Claude Rains, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington  (Oscar)
  • 1940:  Cary Grant, The Philadelphia Story
  • 1941:  Sydney Greenstreet, The Maltese Falcon  (Oscar)
  • 1942:  Walter Huston, Yankee Doodle Dandy  (Oscar)
  • 1943:  Claude Rains, Casablanca  (Oscar)
  • 1944:  Clifton Webb, Laura  (Oscar)
  • 1945:  Robert Mitchum, The Story of G.I. Joe  (Oscar)
  • 1946:  Claude Rains, Notorious  (Oscar)
  • 1947:  Robert Ryan, Crossfire  (Oscar)
  • 1948:  Walter Huston, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre  (Oscar, Globe)
  • 1949:  Kirk Douglas, A Letter to Three Wives
  • 1950:  Erich von Stroheim, Sunset Blvd.  (Oscar, Globe)
  • 1951:  Karl Malden, A Streetcar Named Desire  (Oscar)
  • 1952:  Toshiro Mifune, Rashomon
  • 1953:  Frank Sinatra, From Here to Eternity  (Oscar, Globe)
  • 1954:  Karl Malden, On the Waterfront  (Oscar)
  • 1955:  Jack Lemmon, Mr. Roberts  (Oscar, BAFTA – Actor)
  • 1956:  Toshiro Mifune, The Seven Samurai
  • 1957:  Sessue Hayakawa, The Bridge on the River Kwai  (NBR, Oscar, Globe)
  • 1958:  Burl Ives, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof
  • 1959:  George C. Scott, Anatomy of a Murder  (Oscar)
  • 1960:  Laurence Olivier, Spartacus
  • 1961:  George C. Scott, The Hustler  (Oscar, BAFTA – Actor, Globe)
  • 1962:  Omar Sharif, Lawrence of Arabia  (Globe, Oscar)
  • 1963:  Hugh Griffith, Tom Jones  (Oscar, BAFTA – Actor, Globe)
  • 1964:  Sterling Hayden, Dr. Strangelove
  • 1965:  Tom Courteney, Doctor Zhivago  (Oscar)
  • 1966:  George Segal, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf  (Oscar, Globe)
  • 1967:  Gene Hackman, Bonnie and Clyde  (NSFC, Oscar)
  • 1968:  Anthony Hopkins, The Lion in Winter  (BAFTA)
  • 1969:  Henry Fonda, Once Upon a Time in the West
  • 1970:  Gene Hackman, I Never Sang for My Father  (Oscar)
  • 1971:  Ben Johnson, The Last Picture Show  (NYFC, NBR, Oscar, BAFTA, Globe)
  • 1972:  Al Pacino, The Godfather  (NSFC – Actor, NBR, Oscar, Globe – Actor)
  • 1973:  Robert De Niro, Mean Streets  (NYFC, NSFC)
  • 1974:  Robert De Niro, The Godfather Part II  (Oscar)
  • 1975:  Jack Warden, Shampoo  (Oscar, BAFTA)
  • 1976:  Jason Robards, All the President’s Men  (NYFC, NSFC, NBR, Oscar, BAFTA, Globe)
  • 1977:  Alec Guinness, Star Wars  (Oscar, Globe)
  • 1978:  Christopher Walken, The Deer Hunter  (NYFC, Oscar, Globe)
  • 1979:  Robert Duvall, Apocalypse Now  (BAFTA, Globe, Oscar)
  • 1980:  Joe Pesci, Raging Bull  (NYFC, BSFC, NBR, Oscar, Globe)
  • 1981:  Howard Rollins, Ragtime  (Oscar, Globe)
  • 1982:  Kevin Kline, Sophie’s Choice
  • 1983:  Jack Nicholson, Terms of Endearment  (NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, NBR, Oscar, Globe)
  • 1984:  Haing S. Ngor, The Killing Fields  (Oscar, BAFTA – Actor, Globe)
  • 1985:  Klaus Maria Brandeur, Out of Africa  (NYFC, NBRGlobe, Oscar, BAFTA)
  • 1986:  Michael Caine, Hannah and Her Sisters  (Oscar, Globe)
  • 1987:  Mandy Patinkin, The Princess Bride
  • 1988:  Kevin Kline, A Fish Called Wanda  (Oscar, BAFTA – Actor)
  • 1989:  Denzel Washington, Glory  (Oscar, Globe)
  • 1990:  Joe Pesci, GoodFellas  (LAFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR, Oscar, Globe)
  • 1991:  Alan Rickman, Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves  (BAFTA)
  • 1992:  Gene Hackman, Unforgiven  (NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, Oscar, BAFTA, Globe)
  • 1993:  Ralph Fiennes, Schindler’s List  (NYFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, BAFTA, Oscar, Globe)
  • 1994:  Martin Landau, Ed Wood  (NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, Oscar, SAG, Globe, BAFTA)
  • 1995:  Kevin Spacey, The Usual Suspects  (NYFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR, Oscar, BFCA, SAG, Globe)
  • 1996:  William H. Macy, Fargo  (SAG, Oscar)
  • 1997:  Kevin Spacey, L.A. Confidential  (BSFC)
  • 1998:  Bill Murray, Rushmore  (NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, Globe)
  • 1999:  Tom Cruise, Magnolia  (CFC, Globe, Oscar, SAG)
  • 2000:  Bruce Greenwood, Thirteen Days
  • 2001:  Ian McKellen, Fellowship of the Ring  (SAG, Oscar)
  • 2002:  Chris Cooper, Adaptation  (LAFC, NBR, Oscar, Globe, BFCA, SAG, BAFTA)
  • 2003:  Sean Astin, Return of the King
  • 2004:  Clive Owen, Closer  (NYFC, BAFTA, Globe, Oscar, BFCA)
  • 2005:  Jake Gyllenhaal, Brokeback Mountain  (NBR, BAFTA, Oscar, SAG, BFCA)
  • 2006:  Michael Sheen, The Queen  (LAFC, BAFTA)
  • 2007:  Tom Wilkinson, Michael Clayton  (Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA)
  • 2008:  Heath Ledger, The Dark Knight  (LAFC, NSFC, CFC, Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA)
  • 2009:  Christoph Waltz, Inglourious Basterds  (NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA)
  • 2010:  Christian Bale, The Fighter  (BSFC, CFC, NBR, Oscar, SAG, Globe, BFCA, BAFTA)
  • 2011:  Christopher Plummer, Beginners  (LAFC, NBR, Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA)

Ten Best Performances Not to Win the Nighthawk:

  1. Orson Welles, The Third Man, 1950
  2. Ben Kingsley, Sexy Beast, 2001
  3. Gene Wilder, The Producers, 1968
  4. George Sanders, All About Eve, 1950
  5. Dennis Hopper, Blue Velvet, 1986
  6. Burt Reynolds, Boogie Nights, 1997
  7. George Chakiris, West Side Story, 1961
  8. Samuel L. Jackson, Pulp Fiction, 1994
  9. Jack Nicholson, A Few Good Men, 1992
  10. Thomas Haden Church, Sideways, 2004

Consensus Awards

 

Most Awards (not including the Nighthawk):

  • Christoph Waltz, Inglourious Basterds, 2009  –  10  (Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA, NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC)
  • Martin Landau, Ed Wood, 1994  –  8  (Oscar, SAG, Globe, NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC)
  • Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men, 2007  –  8  (Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA, NYFC, BSFC, CFC)
  • Heath Ledger, The Dark Knight, 2008  –  8  (Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA, LAFC, BSFC, CFC)

Most Awards Points:

  1. Christoph Waltz, Inglourious Basterds, 2009  –  546
  2. Martin Landau, Ed Wood, 1994  –  468
  3. Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men, 2007  –  432
  4. Heath Ledger, The Dark Knight, 2008  –  432
  5. Benicio del Toro, Traffic, 2000  –  394

Highest Awards Percentage:

  1. Gene Hackman, Unforgiven, 1992  –  52.00%
  2. Jack Nicholson, Terms of Endearment, 1983  –  49.61%
  3. Christoph Waltz, Inglourious Basterds, 2009  –  47.15%
  4. Jason Robards, All the President’s Men, 1976  –  46.43%
  5. Edmund Gwenn, Miracle on 34th Street, 1947  /  Walter Huston, Treasure of the Sierra Madre, 1948  –  45.95%

note:  Barry Fitzgerald (Going My Way, 1944) would be in first place with 53.31% if I counted both his Oscar win for Supporting Actor and his Oscar nomination for Actor, both for the same role.

Performances That Won the Oscar, BAFTA and Globe (1968-1994):

  • Ben Johnson, The Last Picture Show, 1971
  • Haing S. Ngor, The Killing Fields, 1984  (wins BAFTA as lead)
  • Gene Hackman, Unforgiven, 1992

Performances That Won the Oscar, BAFTA, Globe, SAG and BFCA:

  • Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men, 2007
  • Heath Ledger, The Dark Knight, 2008
  • Christoph Waltz, Inglourious Basterds, 2009
  • Christopher Plummer, Beginners, 2011

note:  the following lists only count 1954 on, after the NBR added a third award to the mix.

Consensus Blowouts  (Winners over 40%, no one else over 20%)

  • 1971:  Ben Johnson (The Last Picture Show) at 39.82% (close enough), no one else above 8.85%
  • 1976:  Jason Robards (All the President’s Men) at 46.43%, no one else above 12.24%
  • 1983:  Jack Nicholson (Terms of Endearment) at 49.61%, no one else above 7.87%
  • 1992:  Gene Hackman (Unforgiven) at 52.00%, no one else above 19.00%
  • 1994:  Martin Landau  (Ed Wood) at 45.88%, no one else above 13.82%
  • 2008:  Heath Ledger  (The Dark Knight) at 40.22%, no one else above 17.88%
  • 2009:  Christoph Waltz  (Inglourious Basterds) at 47.15%, no one else above 13.21%

Consensus Top Two  (Two both over 25% or over 20% post-1967, within 5% of each other)

  • 1957:  Red Buttons (Sayonara) over Sessue Hayakawa (The Bridge on the River Kwai), 26.22% to 25.45%
  • 1961:  George Chakiris (West Side Story) over Jackie Gleason (The Hustler), 26.22% to 25.45%
  • 1972:  Joel Grey (Cabaret) over Al Pacino (The Godfather), 26.42% to 21.44%
  • 1981:  John Gielgud (Arthur) over Jack Nicholson (Reds), 31.82% to 26.89%
  • 1984:  John Malkovich (Places in the Heart) over Haing S. Ngor (The Killing Fields), 25.07% to 23.18%
  • 1996:  Edward Norton (Primal Fear) over Cuba Gooding (Jerry Maguire), 25.58% to 22.97%

note:  Interesting to note that in the first four cases, the Oscar decided the Consensus winner and in the last two it didn’t.

Consensus Wide Open Field  (No one over 20%, all five above 10% – see chart below for the five actors)

  • 1962, range from 16.40% to 10.32%, includes four of five Oscar nominees
  • 1975, range from 14.68% to 11.26%, includes three of five Oscar nominees
  • 1999, range from 16.47% to 10.69%, includes four of five Oscar nominees
  • 2005, range from 18.65% to 11.66%, includes all five Oscar nominees
  • 2006, range from 15.96% to 11.70%, includes all five Oscar nominees

Consensus Chart:

note:  The chart below I imported from Excel and I hope it isn’t too confusing.  It’s about as big as I could make to still have it fit.  I only include names because if an actor earned points from multiple films, I counted them together.  I also couldn’t get the borders to copy over, so it’s as readable as I could make it.
note:  There might be errors below because I changed the formula during the process.  I reloaded this something like six times while tinkering to try and get it to fit.  If you see mistakes, please don’t point them out.  This list was not originally made for public viewing and I didn’t care if the names were spelled right so please don’t point that out either.

Year Actor AA GG crit BFT SAG BFC RT WT N W % Rk
1936 Brennan, Walter 60 60 60 1 1 33.33% 1
1936 Tamiroff, Akim 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1936 Rathbone, Basil 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1936 Auer, Mischa 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1936 Erwin, Stuart 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1937 Schildkraut, Joseph 60 60 60 1 1 33.33% 1
1937 Mitchell, Thomas 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1937 Bellamy, Ralph 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1937 Warner, H.B. 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1937 Young, Roland 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1938 Brennan, Walter 60 60 60 1 1 33.33% 1
1938 Rathbone, Basil 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1938 Morley, Robert 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1938 Garfield, John 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1938 Lockhart, Gene 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1939 Mitchell, Thomas 60 60 60 1 1 33.33% 1
1939 Rains, Claude 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1939 Aherne, Brian 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1939 Carey, Harry 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1939 Donlevy, Brian 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1940 Brennan, Walter 60 60 60 1 1 33.33% 1
1940 Basserman, Albert 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1940 Gargan, William 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1940 Oakie, Jack 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1940 Stephenson, James 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1941 Crisp, Donald 60 60 60 1 1 33.33% 1
1941 Brennan, Walter 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1941 Coburn, Charles 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1941 Gleason, James 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1941 Greenstreet, Sydney 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1942 Heflin, Van 60 60 60 1 1 33.33% 1
1942 Huston, Walter 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1942 Bendix, Walter 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1942 Morgan, Frank 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1942 Travers, Henry 30 30 30 1 0 16.67% 2
1943 Tamiroff, Akim 30 60 90 72 2 1 32.43% 1
1943 Coburn, Charles 60 60 60 1 1 27.03% 2
1943 Rains, Claude 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 3
1943 Bickford, Charles 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 3
1943 Naish, J. Carrol 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 3
1944 Fitzgerald, Barry 95 60 155 137 3 2 53.31% 1
1944 Rains, Claude 30 30 30 1 0 11.67% 2
1944 Woolley, Monty 30 30 30 1 0 11.67% 2
1944 Webb, Clifton 30 30 30 1 0 11.67% 2
1944 Cronyn, Hume 30 30 30 1 0 11.67% 2
1945 Naish, J. Carrol 30 60 90 72 2 1 32.43% 1
1945 Dunn, James 60 60 60 1 1 27.03% 2
1945 Mitchum, Robert 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 3
1945 Chekhov, Michael 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 3
1945 Dall, John 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 3
1946 Webb, Clifton 30 60 90 72 2 1 32.43% 1
1946 Russell, Harold 60 60 60 1 1 27.03% 2
1946 Rains, Claude 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 3
1946 Coburn, Charles 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 3
1946 Demarest, William 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 3
1947 Gwenn, Edmund 60 60 120 102 2 2 45.95% 1
1947 Bickford, Charles 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 2
1947 Ryan, Robert 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 2
1947 Gomez, Thomas 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 2
1947 Widmark, Richard 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 2
1948 Huston, Walter 60 60 120 102 2 2 45.95% 1
1948 Bickford, Charles 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 2
1948 Ferrer, Jose 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 2
1948 Kellaway, Cecil 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 2
1948 Homolka, Oscar 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 2
1949 Richardson, Ralph 30 56 86 86 2 1 28.76% 1
1949 Whitmore, James 30 60 90 72 2 1 24.08% 2
1949 Jagger, Dean 60 60 60 1 1 20.07% 3
1949 Kennedy, Arthur 30 30 30 1 0 10.03% 4
1949 Ireland, John 30 30 30 1 0 10.03% 4
1949 Brian, David 30 30 21 1 0 7.02% x
1950 Sanders, George 60 30 90 81 2 1 30.68% 1
1950 Gwenn, Edmund 30 60 90 72 2 1 27.27% 2
1950 von Stroheim, Erich 30 30 60 51 2 0 19.32% 3
1950 Chandler, Jeff 30 30 30 1 0 11.36% 4
1950 Jaffe, Sam 30 30 30 1 0 11.36% 4
1951 Ustinov, Peter 30 60 90 72 2 1 32.43% 1
1951 Malden, Karl 60 60 60 1 1 27.03% 2
1951 Young, Gig 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 3
1951 Genn, Leo 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 3
1951 McCarthy, Kevin 30 30 30 1 0 13.51% 3
1952 Quinn, Anthony 60 60 60 1 1 21.05% 1
1952 Mitchell, Millard 60 60 42 1 1 14.74% 2
1952 McLaglen, Victor 30 30 30 1 0 10.53% 3
1952 Burton, Richard 30 30 30 1 0 10.53% 3
1952 Palance, Jack 30 30 30 1 0 10.53% 3
1952 Hunnicutt, Arthur 30 30 30 1 0 10.53% 3
1952 Webb, Clifton 30 30 21 1 0 7.37% x
1952 Roland, Gilbert 30 30 21 1 0 7.37% x
1952 Kasznar, Kurt 30 30 21 1 0 7.37% x
1953 Sinatra, Frank 60 60 120 102 2 2 39.69% 1
1953 Albert, Eddie 30 35 65 65 2 0 25.29% 2
1953 Palance, Jack 30 30 30 1 0 11.67% 3
1953 de Wilde, Brandon 30 30 30 1 0 11.67% 3
1953 Strauss, Robert 30 30 30 1 0 11.67% 3
1954 O’Brien, Edmond 60 60 120 102 2 2 37.78% 1
1954 Williams, John 48 48 48 1 1 17.78% 2
1954 Malden, Karl 30 30 30 1 0 11.11% 3
1954 Steiger, Rod 30 30 30 1 0 11.11% 3
1954 Cobb, Lee J. 30 30 30 1 0 11.11% 3
1954 Tully, Tom 30 30 30 1 0 11.11% 3
1955 Lemmon, Jack 60 35 95 95 2 1 31.15% 1
1955 Kennedy, Arthur 30 60 90 72 2 1 23.61% 2
1955 Bickford, Charles 48 48 48 1 1 15.74% 3
1955 Mineo, Sal 30 30 30 1 0 9.84% 4
1955 O’Connell, Arthur 30 30 30 1 0 9.84% 4
1955 Mantell, Joe 30 30 30 1 0 9.84% 4
1956 Quinn, Anthony 60 30 90 81 2 1 22.88% 1
1956 Basehart, Richard 48 48 48 1 1 13.56% 2
1956 Holliman, Earl 60 60 42 1 1 11.86% 3
1956 Rooney, Mickey 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 4
1956 Murray, Don 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 4
1956 Perkins, Anthony 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 4
1956 Stack, Robert 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 4
1956 Albert, Eddie 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1956 Homolka, Oscar 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1956 Wallach, Eli 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1957 Buttons, Red 60 60 120 102 2 2 26.22% 1
1957 Hayakawa, Sessue 30 30 48 108 99 3 1 25.45% 2
1957 Wynn, Ed 30 35 65 56 2 0 14.40% 3
1957 Kennedy, Arthur 30 30 30 1 0 7.71% 4
1957 de Sica, Vittorio 30 30 30 1 0 7.71% 4
1957 Tamblyn, Russ 30 30 30 1 0 7.71% 4
1957 Cobb, Lee J. 30 30 21 1 0 5.40% x
1957 Patrick, Nigel 30 30 21 1 0 5.40% x
1958 Ives, Burl 60 60 120 102 2 2 28.81% 1
1958 Young, Gig 30 30 60 51 2 0 14.41% 2
1958 Salmi, Albert 48 48 48 1 1 13.56% 3
1958 Kennedy, Arthur 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 4
1958 Cobb, Lee J. 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 4
1958 Bikel, Theodore 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 4
1958 Zimbalist, Efram 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1958 Guardino, Harry 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1958 Ladd, David 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1959 Griffith, Hugh 60 48 108 108 2 2 30.51% 1
1959 Vaughn, Robert 30 30 60 51 2 0 14.41% 2
1959 Boyd, Stephen 60 60 42 1 1 11.86% 3
1959 Wynn, Ed 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 4
1959 O’Connell, Arthur 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 4
1959 Scott, George C. 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 4
1959 Astaire, Fred 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1959 Randall, Tony 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1959 Welch, Joseph 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1960 Ustinov, Peter 60 30 90 81 2 1 22.88% 1
1960 Mineo, Sal 30 60 90 72 2 1 20.34% 2
1960 Peppard, George 48 48 48 1 1 13.56% 3
1960 Falk, Peter 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 4
1960 Kruschen, Jack 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 4
1960 Wills, Chill 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 4
1960 Kinsolving, Lee 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1960 Stricklyn, Ray 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1960 Strode, Woody 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1961 Chakiris, George 60 60 120 102 2 2 26.22% 1
1961 Gleason, Jackie 30 30 48 108 99 3 1 25.45% 2
1961 Scott, George C. 30 30 35 95 86 3 0 22.11% 3
1961 Clift, Montgomery 30 30 60 51 2 0 13.11% 4
1961 Falk, Peter 30 30 30 1 0 7.71% 5
1961 Randall, Tony 30 30 21 1 0 5.40% x
1962 Begley, Ed 60 30 90 81 2 1 16.40% 1
1962 Sharif, Omar 30 60 90 72 2 1 14.57% 2
1962 Sellers, Peter 30 35 65 56 2 0 11.34% 3
1962 Savalas, Telly 30 30 60 51 2 0 10.32% 4
1962 Buono, Victor 30 30 60 51 2 0 10.32% 4
1962 Meredith, Burgess 48 48 48 1 1 9.72% x
1962 Stamp, Terence 30 30 30 1 0 6.07% x
1962 Newman, Paul 30 30 21 1 0 4.25% x
1962 Guardino, Harry 30 30 21 1 0 4.25% x
1962 Martin, Ross 30 30 21 1 0 4.25% x
1962 Romero, Cesar 30 30 21 1 0 4.25% x
1962 Stone, Harold 30 30 21 1 0 4.25% x
1963 Douglas, Melvyn 60 30 48 138 129 3 2 28.54% 1
1963 Griffith, Hugh 30 30 35 95 86 2 0 19.03% 2
1963 Huston, John 30 60 90 72 2 1 15.93% 3
1963 Darin, Bobby 30 30 60 51 2 0 11.28% 4
1963 Adams, Nick 30 30 30 1 0 6.64% 5
1963 Cobb, Lee J. 30 30 21 1 0 4.65% x
1963 Mann, Paul 30 30 21 1 0 4.65% x
1963 McDowall, Roddy 30 30 21 1 0 4.65% x
1963 Rozakis, Gregory 30 30 21 1 0 4.65% x
1964 Ustinov, Peter 60 35 95 85 2 1 22.30% 1
1964 O’Brien, Edmond 30 60 90 72 2 1 19.00% 2
1964 Holloway, Stanley 30 30 60 51 2 0 13.46% 3
1964 Tracy, Lee 30 30 60 51 2 0 13.46% 3
1964 Balsam, Martin 48 48 48 1 1 12.66% 5
1964 Gielgud, John 30 30 30 1 0 7.92% x
1964 Roland, Gilbert 30 30 21 1 0 5.54% x
1964 Delevanti, Cyril 30 30 21 1 0 5.54% x
1965 Balsam, Martin 60 60 60 1 1 16.95% 1
1965 Finlay, Frank 30 30 60 51 2 0 14.41% 2
1965 Andrews, Harry 48 48 48 1 1 13.56% 3
1965 Werner, Oskar 60 60 42 1 1 11.86% 4
1965 Courtenay, Tom 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 5
1965 Bannen, Ian 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 5
1965 Dunn, Michael 30 30 30 1 0 8.47% 5
1965 Savalas, Telly 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1965 Buttons, Red 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1965 Kruger, Hardy 30 30 21 1 0 5.93% x
1966 Shaw, Robert 30 30 48 108 99 3 1 26.12% 1
1966 Matthau, Walter 60 35 95 85 2 1 22.30% 2
1966 Segal, George 30 30 60 51 2 0 13.46% 3
1966 Mako 30 30 60 51 2 0 13.46% 3
1966 Attenborough, Richard 60 60 42 1 1 11.08% 5
1966 Mason, James 30 30 30 1 0 7.92% x
1966 Saxon, John 30 30 21 1 0 5.54% x
1967 Hackman, Gene 30 54 84 84 2 1 20.59% 1
1967 Kennedy, George 60 30 90 81 2 1 19.85% 2
1967 Cassavetes, John 30 30 60 51 2 0 12.50% 3
1967 Pollard, Michael J. 30 30 60 51 2 0 12.50% 3
1967 Ford, Paul 48 48 48 1 1 11.76% 5
1967 Attenborough, Richard 60 60 42 1 1 10.29% x
1967 Kellaway, Cecil 30 30 30 1 0 7.35% x
1967 Zimbalist, Efram 30 30 21 1 0 5.15% x
1968 Cassel, Seymour 30 54 84 84 2 1 14.51% 1
1968 Massey, Daniel 30 60 90 72 2 1 12.44% 2
1968 Holm, Ian 60 60 60 1 1 10.36% 3
1968 Albertson, Jack 60 60 60 1 1 10.36% 3
1968 McKern, Leo 48 48 48 1 1 8.29% 5
1968 Griffith, Hugh 60 60 42 1 1 7.25% x
1968 Segal, George 30 30 30 1 0 5.18% x
1968 Hopkins, Anthony 30 30 30 1 0 5.18% x
1968 McEnery, John 30 30 30 1 0 5.18% x
1968 Wilder, Gene 30 30 30 1 0 5.18% x
1968 Wild, Jack 30 30 30 1 0 5.18% x
1968 Bridges, Beau 30 30 21 1 0 3.63% x
1968 Sheen, Martin 30 30 21 1 0 3.63% x
1968 Davis, Ossie 30 30 21 1 0 3.63% x
1969 Nicholson, Jack 30 30 114 30 204 195 5 2 28.55% 1
1969 Young, Gig 60 60 30 150 132 3 2 19.33% 2
1969 Gould, Elliott 30 35 65 65 2 0 9.52% 3
1969 Olivier, Laurence 60 60 60 1 1 8.78% 4
1969 Quayle, Anthony 30 30 60 51 2 0 7.47% 5
1969 Noiret, Philippe 48 48 48 1 1 7.03% x
1969 Vaughn, Robert 30 30 30 1 0 4.39% x
1969 Klugman, Jack 30 30 30 1 0 4.39% x
1969 Crosse, Rupert 30 30 30 1 0 4.39% x
1969 Buttons, Red 30 30 21 1 0 3.07% x
1969 Vogel, Mitch 30 30 21 1 0 3.07% x
1970 George, Chief Dan 30 30 114 174 165 4 2 29.57% 1
1970 Mills, John 60 60 30 150 132 3 2 23.66% 2
1970 Marley, John 30 30 60 51 2 0 9.14% 3
1970 Langella, Frank 48 48 48 1 1 8.60% 4
1970 Cribbins, Bernard 30 30 30 1 0 5.38% 5
1970 Welland, Colin 30 30 30 1 0 5.38% 5
1970 Hackman, Gene 30 30 30 1 0 5.38% 5
1970 Castellano, Richard 30 30 30 1 0 5.38% 5
1970 Howard, Trevor 30 30 21 1 0 3.76% x
1970 Kennedy, George 30 30 21 1 0 3.76% x
1971 Johnson, Ben 60 60 108 60 288 270 5 5 39.82% 1
1971 Fox, Edward 60 60 60 1 1 8.85% 2
1971 Dern, Bruce 54 54 54 1 1 7.96% 3
1971 Hurt, John 30 30 30 1 0 4.42% 4
1971 Gough, Michael 30 30 30 1 0 4.42% 4
1971 Hendry, Ian 30 30 30 1 0 4.42% 4
1971 Bridges, Jeff 30 30 30 1 0 4.42% 4
1971 Scheider, Roy 30 30 30 1 0 4.42% 4
1971 Frey, Leonard 30 30 30 1 0 4.42% 4
1971 Jaeckel, Richard 30 30 30 1 0 4.42% 4
1971 Baker, Tom 30 30 21 1 0 3.10% x
1971 Garfunkel, Art 30 30 21 1 0 3.10% x
1971 Mann, Paul 30 30 21 1 0 3.10% x
1971 Vincent, Jan-Michael 30 30 21 1 0 3.10% x
1972 Grey, Joel 60 60 102 222 204 4 4 26.42% 1
1972 Pacino, Al 30 35 111 176 166 4 2 21.44% 2
1972 Duvall, Robert 30 60 30 120 120 3 1 15.54% 3
1972 Albert, Eddie 30 35 54 119 109 3 1 14.05% 4
1972 Caan, James 30 30 60 51 2 0 6.61% 5
1972 Richardson, Ralph 30 30 30 1 0 3.89% x
1972 Adrian, Max 30 30 30 1 0 3.89% x
1972 Coco, James 30 30 21 1 0 2.72% x
1972 McCowen, Alec 30 30 21 1 0 2.72% x
1972 Revill, Clive 30 30 21 1 0 2.72% x
1973 Houseman, John 60 60 48 168 150 3 3 23.15% 1
1973 De Niro, Robert 114 114 114 2 2 17.59% 2
1973 Quaid, Randy 30 30 30 90 81 3 0 12.50% 3
1973 Lowe, Arthur 60 60 60 1 1 9.26% 4
1973 Gilford, Jack 30 30 60 51 2 0 7.87% 5
1973 Bannen, Ian 30 30 30 1 0 4.63% x
1973 Elliott, Denholm 30 30 30 1 0 4.63% x
1973 Lonsdale, Michael 30 30 30 1 0 4.63% x
1973 Gardenia, Vincent 30 30 30 1 0 4.63% x
1973 Miller, Jason 30 30 30 1 0 4.63% x
1973 von Sydow, Max 30 30 21 1 0 3.24% x
1973 Balsam, Martin 30 30 21 1 0 3.24% x
1974 Astaire, Fred 30 60 60 150 132 3 2 19.47% 1
1974 Lowenadler, Holger 102 102 102 2 2 15.04% 2
1974 Boyer, Charles 60 60 60 1 1 8.85% 3
1974 Gielgud, John 60 60 60 1 1 8.85% 3
1974 De Niro, Robert 60 60 60 1 1 8.85% 3
1974 Huston, John 30 30 60 51 2 0 7.52% x
1974 Balsam, Martin 30 30 30 1 0 4.42% x
1974 Faith, Adam 30 30 30 1 0 4.42% x
1974 Bridges, Jeff 30 30 30 1 0 4.42% x
1974 Gazzo, Michael V. 30 30 30 1 0 4.42% x
1974 Strasberg, Lee 30 30 30 1 0 4.42% x
1974 Albert, Eddie 30 30 21 1 0 3.10% x
1974 Dern, Bruce 30 30 21 1 0 3.10% x
1974 Waterston, Sam 30 30 21 1 0 3.10% x
1975 Dourif, Brad 30 60 90 90 2 1 14.68% 1
1975 Burns, George 60 35 95 85 2 1 13.78% 2
1975 Meredith, Burgess 30 30 30 90 81 3 0 13.21% 3
1975 Gibson, Henry 30 54 84 75 2 1 12.23% 4
1975 Durning, Charles 30 48 78 69 2 1 11.26% 5
1975 Arkin, Alan 60 60 60 1 1 9.79% x
1975 Warden, Jack 30 30 60 60 2 0 9.79% x
1975 Benjamin, Richard 60 60 42 1 1 6.85% x
1975 Sarandon, Chris 30 30 30 1 0 4.89% x
1975 Cazale, John 30 30 21 1 0 3.43% x
1976 Robards, Jason 60 30 162 30 282 273 6 4 46.43% 1
1976 Olivier, Laurence 30 60 90 72 2 1 12.24% 2
1976 Balsam, Martin 30 30 30 1 0 5.10% 3
1976 Duvall, Robert 30 30 30 1 0 5.10% 3
1976 Mostel, Zero 30 30 30 1 0 5.10% 3
1976 Meredith, Burgess 30 30 30 1 0 5.10% 3
1976 Beatty, Ned 30 30 30 1 0 5.10% 3
1976 Young, Burt 30 30 30 1 0 5.10% 3
1976 Werner, Oskar 30 30 21 1 0 3.57% x
1976 Feldman, Marty 30 30 21 1 0 3.57% x
1976 Howard, Ron 30 30 21 1 0 3.57% x
1977 Robards, Jason 60 30 60 60 210 201 4 3 27.24% 1
1977 Fox, Edward 54 60 114 114 2 2 15.45% 2
1977 Schell, Maximilian 30 30 60 120 111 3 1 15.04% 3
1977 Firth, Peter 30 60 90 72 2 1 9.76% 4
1977 Baryshnikov, Mikhail 30 30 60 51 2 0 6.91% 5
1977 Guinness, Alec 30 30 60 51 2 0 6.91% 5
1977 Skerritt, Tom 48 48 48 1 1 6.50% x
1977 Blakely, Colin 30 30 30 1 0 4.07% x
1977 Hordern, Michael 30 30 30 1 0 4.07% x
1977 Truffaut, Francois 30 30 30 1 0 4.07% x
1978 Walken, Christopher 60 30 60 30 180 171 4 2 24.36% 1
1978 Morley, Robert 30 114 144 135 3 2 19.23% 2
1978 Hurt, John 30 60 60 150 132 3 2 18.80% 3
1978 Farnsworth, Richard 30 102 132 132 3 2 18.80% 3
1978 Dern, Bruce 30 30 60 51 2 0 7.26% 5
1978 Hackman, Gene 30 30 30 1 0 4.27% x
1978 Warden, Jack 30 30 30 1 0 4.27% x
1978 Moore, Dudley 30 30 21 1 0 2.99% x
1979 Douglas, Melvyn 60 60 120 240 222 4 4 33.18% 1
1979 Duvall, Robert 30 60 60 150 132 3 2 19.73% 2
1979 Forrest, Frederic 30 30 54 114 105 3 1 15.70% 3
1979 Henry, Justin 30 30 60 51 2 0 7.62% 4
1979 Dooley, Paul 48 48 48 1 1 7.17% 5
1979 Hurt, John 30 30 30 1 0 4.48% x
1979 Elliott, Denholm 30 30 30 1 0 4.48% x
1979 Rooney, Mickey 30 30 30 1 0 4.48% x
1979 Olivier, Laurence 30 30 21 1 0 3.14% x
1980 Pesci, Joe 30 30 162 222 213 5 3 36.60% 1
1980 Hutton, Timothy 60 60 60 180 162 3 3 27.84% 2
1980 Robards, Jason 30 30 54 114 105 3 1 18.04% 3
1980 Hirsch, Judd 30 30 60 51 2 0 8.76% 4
1980 O’Keefe, Michael 30 30 30 1 0 5.15% 5
1980 Wilson, Scott 30 30 21 1 0 3.61% x
1981 Gielgud, John 60 60 120 30 270 252 5 4 31.82% 1
1981 Nicholson, Jack 30 30 102 60 222 213 5 3 26.89% 2
1981 Holm, Ian 30 60 90 90 2 1 11.36% 3
1981 Preston, Robert 54 54 54 1 1 6.82% 4
1981 Coco, James 30 30 60 51 2 0 6.44% 5
1981 Rollins Jr., Howard E. 30 30 60 51 2 0 6.44% 5
1981 Elliott, Denholm 30 30 30 1 0 3.79% x
1981 Havers, Nigel 30 30 30 1 0 3.79% x
1981 Welles, Orson 30 30 21 1 0 2.65% x
1982 Lithgow, John 30 120 150 150 3 2 21.52% 1
1982 Rourke, Mickey 108 108 108 2 2 15.49% 2
1982 Preston, Robert 30 35 48 113 103 3 1 14.71% 3
1982 Gossett Jr., Louis 60 60 120 102 2 2 14.63% 4
1982 Mason, James 30 30 60 51 2 0 7.32% 5
1982 Fox, Edward 30 30 30 1 0 4.30% x
1982 Finlay, Frank 30 30 30 1 0 4.30% x
1982 Seth, Roshan 30 30 30 1 0 4.30% x
1982 Durning, Charles 30 30 30 1 0 4.30% x
1982 Julia, Raul 30 30 21 1 0 3.01% x
1982 Keith, David 30 30 21 1 0 3.01% x
1982 Metzler, Jim 30 30 21 1 0 3.01% x
1983 Nicholson, Jack 60 60 276 396 378 7 7 49.61% 1
1983 Elliott, Denholm 60 60 60 1 1 7.87% 2
1983 Durning, Charles 30 30 60 51 2 0 6.69% 3
1983 Hoskins, Bob 30 30 30 1 0 3.94% 4
1983 Lancaster, Burt 30 30 30 1 0 3.94% 4
1983 Lewis, Jerry 30 30 30 1 0 3.94% 4
1983 Elphick, Michael 30 30 30 1 0 3.94% 4
1983 Lithgow, John 30 30 30 1 0 3.94% 4
1983 Shepard, Sam 30 30 30 1 0 3.94% 4
1983 Torn, Rip 30 30 30 1 0 3.94% 4
1983 Hackman, Gene 30 30 21 1 0 2.76% x
1983 Bauer, Steven 30 30 21 1 0 2.76% x
1983 Russell, Kurt 30 30 21 1 0 2.76% x
1984 Malkovich, John 30 156 186 186 4 3 25.07% 1
1984 Ngor, Haing S. 60 60 70 190 172 3 3 23.18% 2
1984 Richardson, Ralph 30 60 30 120 120 3 1 16.17% 3
1984 Caesar, Adolph 30 30 60 120 111 3 1 14.96% 4
1984 Morita, Noriyuki 30 30 60 51 2 0 6.87% 5
1984 Holm, Ian 30 30 30 1 0 4.04% x
1984 Fox, James 30 30 30 1 0 4.04% x
1984 Crenna, Richard 30 30 21 1 0 2.83% x
1984 Jones, Jeffrey 30 30 21 1 0 2.83% x
1985 Brandauer, Klaus Maria 30 60 108 30 228 210 5 3 27.56% 1
1985 Gielgud, John 114 30 144 144 3 2 18.90% 2
1985 Elliott, Denholm 120 120 120 2 2 15.75% 3
1985 Ameche, Don 60 60 60 1 1 7.87% 4
1985 Holm, Ian 54 54 54 1 1 7.09% 5
1985 Roberts, Eric 30 30 60 51 2 0 6.69% x
1985 Hickey, William 30 30 30 1 0 3.94% x
1985 Loggia, Robert 30 30 30 1 0 3.94% x
1985 Grey, Joel 30 30 21 1 0 2.76% x
1985 Lone, John 30 30 21 1 0 2.76% x
1985 Stoltz, Eric 30 30 21 1 0 2.76% x
1986 Hopper, Dennis 30 60 168 258 240 5 4 31.54% 1
1986 Caine, Michael 60 30 35 125 116 3 1 15.24% 2
1986 Day-Lewis, Daniel 108 108 108 2 2 14.19% 3
1986 Liotta, Ray 30 54 84 75 2 1 9.86% 4
1986 Berenger, Tom 30 60 90 72 2 1 9.46% 5
1986 Elliott, Denholm 30 30 60 60 2 0 7.88% x
1986 Callow, Simon 30 30 30 1 0 3.94% x
1986 Jaffrey, Saeed 30 30 30 1 0 3.94% x
1986 Dafoe, Willem 30 30 30 1 0 3.94% x
1987 Freeman, Morgan 30 30 174 234 225 5 3 28.59% 1
1987 Connery, Sean 60 60 48 30 198 180 4 3 22.87% 2
1987 Ermey, R Lee 30 54 84 75 2 1 9.53% 3
1987 Auteuil, Daniel 60 60 60 1 1 7.62% 4
1987 Washington, Denzel 30 35 65 55 2 0 6.93% 5
1987 O’Toole, Peter 30 30 30 1 0 3.81% x
1987 Bannen, Ian 30 30 30 1 0 3.81% x
1987 Thaw, John 30 30 30 1 0 3.81% x
1987 Gardenia, Vincent 30 30 30 1 0 3.81% x
1987 Brooks, Albert 30 30 30 1 0 3.81% x
1987 Dreyfuss, Richard 30 30 21 1 0 2.67% x
1987 Lowe, Rob 30 30 21 1 0 2.67% x
1988 Stockwell, Dean 30 168 198 198 4 3 24.57% 1
1988 Landau, Martin 30 60 48 138 120 3 2 14.89% 2
1988 Guinness, Alec 30 30 60 120 111 3 1 13.77% 3
1988 Phoenix, River 30 30 48 108 99 3 1 12.28% 4
1988 Kline, Kevin 60 35 95 95 2 1 11.79% 5
1988 Palin, Michael 60 60 60 1 1 7.44% x
1988 Ackland, Joss 30 30 30 1 0 3.72% x
1988 Suchet, David 30 30 30 1 0 3.72% x
1988 Julia, Raul 30 30 21 1 0 2.61% x
1988 Harris, Neil Patrick 30 30 21 1 0 2.61% x
1988 Phillips, Lou Diamond 30 30 21 1 0 2.61% x
1989 Aiello, Danny 30 30 162 30 252 243 6 3 29.24% 1
1989 Washington, Denzel 60 60 120 102 2 2 12.27% 2
1989 Landau, Martin 30 60 90 90 2 1 10.83% 3
1989 Brando, Marlon 30 30 30 90 81 3 0 9.75% 4
1989 Alda, Alan 48 30 78 78 2 1 9.39% 5
1989 McAnally, Ray 60 60 60 1 1 7.22% x
1989 Bridges, Beau 54 54 54 1 1 6.50% x
1989 Connery, Sean 30 30 60 51 2 0 6.14% x
1989 Aykroyd, Dan 30 30 30 1 0 3.61% x
1989 Harris, Ed 30 30 21 1 0 2.53% x
1989 Willis, Bruce 30 30 21 1 0 2.53% x
1990 Pesci, Joe 60 30 210 300 291 6 5 36.33% 1
1990 Davison, Bruce 30 60 114 204 186 4 3 23.22% 2
1990 Pacino, Al 30 30 30 90 81 3 0 10.11% 3
1990 Cascio, Salvatore 60 60 60 1 1 7.49% 4
1990 Garcia, Andy 30 30 60 51 2 0 6.37% 5
1990 Hurt, John 30 30 30 1 0 3.75% x
1990 Bates, Alan 30 30 30 1 0 3.75% x
1990 Greene, Graham 30 30 30 1 0 3.75% x
1990 Elizondo, Hector 30 30 21 1 0 2.62% x
1990 Assante, Armand 30 30 21 1 0 2.62% x
1991 Keitel, Harvey 30 30 102 162 153 4 2 22.57% 1
1991 Palance, Jack 60 60 120 102 2 2 15.04% 2
1991 Lerner, Michael 30 60 90 90 2 1 13.27% 3
1991 Jackson, Samuel L. 60 60 60 1 1 8.85% 4
1991 Rickman, Alan 60 60 60 1 1 8.85% 4
1991 Jones, Tommy Lee 30 30 60 60 2 0 8.85% 4
1991 Kingsley, Ben 30 30 60 51 2 0 7.52% x
1991 Jacobi, Derek 30 30 30 1 0 4.42% x
1991 Strong, Andrew 30 30 30 1 0 4.42% x
1991 Beatty, Ned 30 30 21 1 0 3.10% x
1991 Goodman, John 30 30 21 1 0 3.10% x
1992 Hackman, Gene 60 60 228 60 408 390 7 7 52.00% 1
1992 Nicholson, Jack 30 30 96 156 147 4 2 19.60% 2
1992 Davidson, Jaye 30 30 60 60 2 0 8.00% 3
1992 Pacino, Al 30 30 60 51 2 0 6.80% 4
1992 Paymer, David 30 30 60 51 2 0 6.80% 4
1992 West, Samuel 30 30 30 1 0 4.00% x
1992 O’Donnell, Chris 30 30 21 1 0 2.80% x
1993 Fiennes, Ralph 30 30 216 60 336 327 7 5 39.49% 1
1993 Jones, Tommy Lee 60 60 108 30 258 240 5 4 28.99% 2
1993 DiCaprio, Leonardo 30 30 48 108 99 3 1 11.96% 3
1993 Malkovich, John 30 30 30 90 81 3 0 9.78% 4
1993 Kingsley, Ben 30 30 30 1 0 3.62% 5
1993 Postlethwaite, Pete 30 30 30 1 0 3.62% 5
1993 Penn, Sean 30 30 21 1 0 2.54% x
1994 Landau, Martin 60 60 276 30 60 486 468 9 8 45.88% 1
1994 Jackson, Samuel L. 30 30 60 30 150 141 4 1 13.82% 2
1994 Sinise, Gary 30 30 48 30 138 129 4 1 12.65% 3
1994 Palminteri, Chazz 30 30 60 60 2 0 5.88% 4
1994 Scofield, Paul 30 30 60 60 2 0 5.88% 4
1994 Turturro, John 30 30 60 51 2 0 5.00% x
1994 Callow, Simon 30 30 30 1 0 2.94% x
1994 Holm, Ian 30 30 30 1 0 2.94% x
1994 Hannah, John 30 30 30 1 0 2.94% x
1994 Bacon, Kevin 30 30 21 1 0 2.06% x
1995 Spacey, Kevin 60 30 210 30 60 390 369 8 6 38.20% 1
1995 Harris, Ed 30 30 60 60 180 159 4 2 16.46% 2
1995 Cheadle, Don 114 30 144 144 3 2 14.91% 3
1995 Roth, Tim 30 30 60 120 111 3 1 11.49% 4
1995 Pitt, Brad 30 60 90 72 2 1 7.45% 5
1995 Branagh, Kenneth 30 30 30 1 0 3.11% x
1995 Rickman, Alan 30 30 30 1 0 3.11% x
1995 Cromwell, James 30 30 30 1 0 3.11% x
1995 Leguizamo, John 30 30 21 1 0 2.17% x
1996 Norton, Edward 30 60 162 30 282 264 6 4 25.58% 1
1996 Gooding Jr., Cuba 60 30 48 60 60 258 237 5 4 22.97% 2
1996 Scofield, Paul 30 60 90 81 2 1 7.85% 3
1996 Belafonte, Harry 60 60 60 1 1 5.81% 4
1996 Macy, William H. 30 30 60 60 2 0 5.81% 4
1996 Donovan, Martin 54 54 54 1 1 5.23% x
1996 Shalhoub, Tony 54 54 54 1 1 5.23% x
1996 Woods, James 30 30 60 51 2 0 4.94% x
1996 Azaria, Hank 30 30 30 1 0 2.91% x
1996 Taylor, Noah 30 30 30 1 0 2.91% x
1996 Rickman, Alan 30 30 30 1 0 2.91% x
1996 Gielgud, John 30 30 30 1 0 2.91% x
1996 Mueller-Stahl, Armin 30 30 30 1 0 2.91% x
1996 Jackson, Samuel L. 30 30 21 1 0 2.03% x
1997 Reynolds, Burt 30 60 222 30 30 372 354 8 5 32.21% 1
1997 Williams, Robin 60 30 60 150 141 3 2 12.83% 2
1997 Kinnear, Greg 30 30 48 30 138 129 4 1 11.74% 3
1997 Hopkins, Anthony 30 30 30 60 150 129 4 1 11.74% 4
1997 Spacey, Kevin 54 35 89 89 2 1 8.10% 5
1997 Connolly, Billy 35 30 65 65 2 0 5.91% x
1997 Wilkinson, Tom 60 60 60 1 1 5.46% x
1997 Everett, Rupert 30 30 60 51 2 0 4.64% x
1997 Addy, Mark 30 30 30 1 0 2.73% x
1997 Forster, Robert 30 30 30 1 0 2.73% x
1997 Voight, Jon 30 30 21 1 0 1.91% x
1998 Thornton, Billy Bob 30 30 108 30 60 258 237 6 3 21.76% 1
1998 Murray, Bill 30 174 204 195 4 3 17.91% 2
1998 Rush, Geoffrey 30 30 90 30 180 171 5 1 15.70% 3
1998 Harris, Ed 30 60 48 30 168 150 4 2 13.77% 4
1998 Duvall, Robert 30 30 60 120 111 3 1 10.19% 5
1998 Coburn, James 60 30 90 90 2 1 8.26% x
1998 Macy, William H. 54 54 54 1 1 4.96% x
1998 Kelly, David 30 30 30 1 0 2.75% x
1998 Wilkinson, Tom 30 30 30 1 0 2.75% x
1998 Sutherland, Donald 30 30 21 1 0 1.93% x
1999 Caine, Michael 60 30 30 60 180 171 4 2 16.47% 1
1999 Plummer, Christopher 168 168 168 3 3 16.18% 2
1999 Cruise, Tom 30 60 48 30 168 150 4 2 14.45% 3
1999 Duncan, Michael Clarke 30 30 30 60 150 129 4 1 12.43% 4
1999 Law, Jude 30 30 60 120 111 3 1 10.69% 5
1999 Osment, Haley Joel 30 30 30 90 81 3 0 7.80% x
1999 Malkovich, John 60 60 60 1 1 5.78% x
1999 Hoffman, Philip Seymour 48 48 48 1 1 4.62% x
1999 Cooper, Chris 30 30 30 1 0 2.89% x
1999 Spall, Timothy 30 30 30 1 0 2.89% x
1999 Bentley, Wes 30 30 30 1 0 2.89% x
1999 Ifans, Rhys 30 30 30 1 0 2.89% x
2000 Del Toro, Benicio 60 60 162 60 70 412 394 7 7 35.56% 1
2000 Phoenix, Joaquin 30 30 48 30 30 60 228 207 6 2 18.68% 2
2000 Dafoe, Willem 30 30 60 30 150 141 4 1 12.73% 3
2000 Finney, Albert 30 30 30 60 150 141 4 1 12.73% 3
2000 Bridges, Jeff 30 30 30 90 81 3 0 7.31% 5
2000 Willard, Fred 54 54 54 1 1 4.87% x
2000 Oldman, Gary 30 30 30 1 0 2.71% x
2000 Lewis, Gary 30 30 30 1 0 2.71% x
2000 Reed, Oliver 30 30 30 1 0 2.71% x
2001 Broadbent, Jim 60 60 108 95 30 30 383 359 8 5 30.50% 1
2001 Buscemi, Steve 30 162 192 183 4 3 15.55% 2
2001 Kingsley, Ben 30 30 54 30 60 204 183 5 2 15.55% 2
2001 McKellen, Ian 30 35 60 125 125 3 1 10.62% 4
2001 Voight, Jon 30 30 30 90 75 3 0 6.37% 5
2001 Hawke, Ethan 30 30 60 60 2 0 5.10% x
2001 Christensen, Hayden 30 30 60 51 2 0 4.33% x
2001 Murphy, Eddie 30 30 30 1 0 2.55% x
2001 Bonneville, Hugh 30 30 30 1 0 2.55% x
2001 Coltrane, Robbie 30 30 30 1 0 2.55% x
2001 Firth, Colin 30 30 30 1 0 2.55% x
2001 Law, Jude 30 30 21 1 0 1.78% x
2002 Cooper, Chris 60 60 108 30 30 60 348 318 7 5 29.28% 1
2002 Walken, Christopher 30 54 60 60 204 204 4 3 18.78% 2
2002 Quaid, Dennis 30 108 30 168 159 4 2 14.64% 3
2002 Harris, Ed 30 30 30 30 120 111 4 0 10.22% 4
2002 Newman, Paul 30 30 30 30 120 105 4 0 9.67% 5
2002 Molina, Alfred 30 30 30 90 84 3 0 7.73% x
2002 Arkin, Alan 54 54 54 1 1 4.97% x
2002 Reilly, John C. 30 30 60 51 2 0 4.70% x
2003 Robbins, Tim 60 60 48 30 60 60 318 288 6 5 24.20% 1
2003 Baldwin, Alec 30 30 48 30 30 168 153 5 1 12.86% 2
2003 Sarsgaard, Peter 30 108 138 129 3 2 10.84% 3
2003 Nighy, Bill 60 60 120 120 2 2 10.08% 4
2003 Del Toro, Benicio 30 35 30 30 125 119 4 0 10.00% 5
2003 Watanabe, Ken 30 30 30 30 120 105 4 0 8.82% x
2003 Levy, Eugene 60 60 60 1 1 5.04% x
2003 Bettany, Paul 30 30 60 54 2 0 4.54% x
2003 Finney, Albert 30 30 60 51 2 0 4.29% x
2003 Cooper, Chris 30 30 30 1 0 2.52% x
2003 McKellen, Ian 30 30 30 1 0 2.52% x
2003 Honsou, Djimon 30 30 30 1 0 2.52% x
2003 Macy, William H. 30 30 21 1 0 1.76% x
2004 Church, Thomas Haden 30 30 264 30 60 414 393 9 6 33.08% 1
2004 Owen, Clive 30 60 60 60 30 240 216 5 3 18.18% 2
2004 Foxx, Jamie 30 30 54 30 30 30 204 189 6 1 15.91% 3
2004 Freeman, Morgan 60 30 60 30 180 165 4 2 13.89% 4
2004 Alda, Alan 30 30 60 60 2 0 5.05% 5
2004 Garner, James 30 30 30 1 0 2.53% x
2004 Highmore, Freddie 30 30 30 1 0 2.53% x
2004 Davis, Philip 30 30 30 1 0 2.53% x
2004 De la Serna, Rodrigo 30 30 30 1 0 2.53% x
2004 Sarsgaard, Peter 30 30 24 1 0 2.02% x
2004 Carradine, David 30 30 21 1 0 1.77% x
2005 Clooney, George 60 60 60 30 30 240 216 5 3 18.65% 1
2005 Giamatti, Paul 30 30 54 60 60 234 213 5 3 18.39% 2
2005 Gyllenhal, Jake 30 48 60 30 30 198 192 5 2 16.58% 3
2005 Hurt, William 30 120 150 150 3 2 12.95% 4
2005 Dillon, Matt 30 30 30 30 30 150 135 5 0 11.66% 5
2005 Cheadle, Don 30 30 60 60 2 0 5.18% x
2005 Harris, Ed 54 54 54 1 1 4.66% x
2005 Rourke, Mickey 48 48 48 1 1 4.15% x
2005 Howard, Terrence 30 30 24 1 0 2.07% x
2005 Costner, Kevin 30 30 24 1 0 2.07% x
2005 Hoskins, Bob 30 30 21 1 0 1.81% x
2005 Ferrell, Will 30 30 21 1 0 1.81% x
2006 Murphy, Eddie 30 60 60 60 210 180 4 3 15.96% 1
2006 Arkin, Alan 60 60 30 30 180 174 4 2 15.43% 2
2006 Haley, Jackie Earl 30 108 30 168 168 4 2 14.89% 3
2006 Wahlberg, Mark 30 30 108 168 159 4 2 14.10% 4
2006 Honsou, Djimon 30 48 30 30 138 132 4 1 11.70% 5
2006 Sheen, Michael 60 30 90 90 2 1 7.98% x
2006 Nicholson, Jack 30 30 30 90 75 3 0 6.65% x
2006 Affleck, Ben 30 30 60 45 2 0 3.99% x
2006 McAvoy, James 30 30 30 1 0 2.66% x
2006 Phillips, Leslie 30 30 30 1 0 2.66% x
2006 Beach, Adam 30 30 24 1 0 2.13% x
2006 Pitt, Brad 30 30 21 1 0 1.86% x
2007 Bardem, Javier 60 60 162 60 60 60 462 432 8 8 38.10% 1
2007 Affleck, Casey 30 30 102 30 30 222 207 6 2 18.25% 2
2007 Wilkinson, Tom 30 30 30 30 30 150 135 5 0 11.90% 3
2007 Hoffman, Philip Seymour 30 30 30 30 120 105 4 0 9.26% 4
2007 Holbrook, Hal 30 30 30 90 84 3 0 7.41% 5
2007 Ivanov, Vlad 60 60 60 1 1 5.29% x
2007 Jones, Tommy Lee 30 30 60 60 2 0 5.29% x
2007 Dano, Paul 30 30 30 1 0 2.65% x
2007 Travolta, John 30 30 21 1 0 1.85% x
2008 Ledger, Heath 60 60 162 60 60 60 462 432 8 8 40.22% 1
2008 Brolin, Josh 30 108 30 30 198 192 5 2 17.88% 2
2008 Hoffman, Philip Seymour 30 30 30 30 30 150 135 5 0 12.57% 3
2008 Downey Jr., Robert 30 30 30 30 30 150 135 5 0 12.57% 3
2008 Marsan, Eddie 54 54 54 1 1 5.03% 5
2008 Pitt, Brad 30 30 30 1 0 2.79% x
2008 Shannon, Michael 30 30 30 1 0 2.79% x
2008 Franco, James 30 30 24 1 0 2.23% x
2008 Fiennes, Ralph 30 30 21 1 0 1.96% x
2008 Cruise, Tom 30 30 21 1 0 1.96% x
2009 Waltz, Christoph 60 60 276 60 60 60 576 546 10 10 47.15% 1
2009 Harrelson, Woody 30 30 48 30 30 168 153 5 1 13.21% 2
2009 Tucci, Stanley 30 30 30 30 30 150 135 5 0 11.66% 3
2009 Damon, Matt 30 30 30 30 120 105 4 0 9.07% 4
2009 Plummer, Christopher 30 30 30 90 81 3 0 6.99% 5
2009 Molina, Alfred 30 30 60 54 2 0 4.66% x
2009 Nyby, Christian 30 30 60 54 2 0 4.66% x
2009 Baldwin, Alec 30 30 30 1 0 2.59% x
2010 Bale, Christian 60 60 150 30 60 60 420 390 8 7 35.52% 1
2010 Rush, Geoffrey 30 30 54 60 30 30 234 219 6 2 19.95% 2
2010 Ruffalo, Mark 30 60 30 30 30 180 174 5 1 15.85% 3
2010 Renner, Jeremy 30 30 30 30 120 105 4 0 9.56% 4
2010 Garfield, Andrew 30 30 30 90 75 3 0 6.83% 5
2010 Hawkes, John 30 30 60 60 2 0 5.46% x
2010 Postlethwaite, Pete 30 30 30 1 0 2.73% x
2010 Rockwell, Sam 30 30 24 1 0 2.19% x
2010 Douglas, Michael 30 30 21 1 0 1.91% x
2011 Plummer, Christopher 60 60 108 60 60 60 408 378 7 7 32.64% 1
2011 Brooks, Albert 30 216 30 276 261 6 4 22.54% 2
2011 Branagh, Kenneth 30 30 30 30 30 150 135 5 0 11.66% 3
2011 Hill, Jonah 30 30 30 30 120 111 4 0 9.59% 4
2011 Nolte, Nick 30 30 30 90 84 3 0 7.25% 5
2011 Hammer, Arnie 30 30 30 1 0 2.59% x
2011 Broadbent, Jim 30 30 30 1 0 2.59% x
2011 Hoffman, Philip Seymour 30 30 30 1 0 2.59% x
2011 von Sydow, Max 30 30 30 1 0 2.59% x
2011 Oswalt, Patton 30 30 24 1 0 2.07% x
2011 Serkis, Andy 30 30 24 1 0 2.07% x
2011 Mortenson, Viggo 30 30 21 1 0 1.81% x


Lists

  • Best Oscar Winner Snubbed by the BAFTAs:  Jack Nicholson  (Terms of Endearment)
  • Best Oscar Nominee Snubbed by the BAFTAs:  Ian McKellen  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)
  • Best BAFTA Winner Snubbed by the Oscars:  Alan Rickman  (Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves)
  • Best BAFTA Nominee Snubbed by the Oscars:  Anthony Hopkins  (The Lion in Winter)
  • Best Performance Snubbed by both the Oscars and BAFTAs:  Mandy Patinkin  (The Princess Bride)
  • Best Performance Snubbed by the Oscars and BAFTAs but Nominated by the BFCA:  Peter Sarsgaard  (Kinsey)
  • Best Performance Snubbed by the Oscars and BAFTAs but Nominated by SAG:  John Turturro  (Quiz Show)
  • Average Nighthawk Winner  (9 point scale):  7.96
  • Average Oscar Winner  (9 point scale):  6.74
  • Average BAFTA Winner  (9 point scale):  5.40
  • Average Globe Winner  (9 point scale):  6.11
  • Average SAG Winner  (9 point scale):  7.00
  • Average BFCA Winner  (9 point scale):  7.18
  • Average Nighthawk 2nd Place  (9 point scale):  6.69
  • Average Nighthawk Nominee  (9 point scale):  6.24
  • Average Oscar Nominee  (9 point scale):  5.30
  • Average BAFTA Nominee  (9 point scale):  4.54
  • Average Globe Nominee  (9 point scale):  4.54
  • Average SAG Nominee  (9 point scale):  5.56
  • Average BFCA Nominee  (9 point scale):  5.67
  • Average Oscar Score:  79.66
  • Average Oscar Winner Rank:  3.39
  • Average Oscar Winner Rank Among Nominees:  2.00

Singularity

 

note:  Of the 14,000+ films I have seen, this is the singularity.  It’s the only performance that earns higher than a 4 that comes from a film less than *** and earns no other points.  So, in other words, this is not a good film, but the performance alone makes it worth seeing.

  1. Edward Norton, Primal Fear, 1996

See Them Only for the Supporting Actor Performances

 

Four films have earned nominations (at least) from the Oscars, Globes and BAFTAs from Supporting Actor while earning no other nominations.  The first was A Dry White Season (Marlon Brando, 1988).  The second, Rob Roy (Tim Roth, 1995), did win the BAFTA.  The third, Primal Fear, listed above, won the Globe and also earned wins (along with two other Norton performances) at the LAFC, BSFC and NBR.  The final one was Beginners in 2011 in which Christopher Plummer won all five awards groups as well as the LAFC and NBR.

Book

Old Familiar Faces: The Great Character Actors and Actresses of Hollywood’s Golden Era, Robert A. Juran, 1995

Not the only guide to character actors (when I was looking for an image of the cover, I also found The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Character Actors, Hollywood Character Actors and Also Starring: Forty Biographical Essays on the Greatest Character Actors of Hollywood’s Golden Era, 1930-1965.  Sadly, only the last of those seems to be still in print and this book is also out of print, though I link to a site where you can get a used copy.  It’s totally worth it, with pictures, full multi-page descriptions and filmographies for 90 of the best in the business during the Studio Era, Oscar winners like Walter Brennan, Charles Coburn and Donald Crisp and great character actors like Lionel Barrymore, Peter Lorre and Edward Everett Horton.  And those are just male examples who have been mentioned already and those from the first page of the Table of Contents no less.  It’s a fantastic book and I don’t remember precisely where I got it but this book or a similar one (though I highly recommend this one) is a must for any film lover’s library.

Since 2011

Oscar Notes:  Three Billboards would become the first film since 1991 to earn multiple Supporting Actor nominations while becoming the first since 1983 to earn multiple nominations and still win the Oscar.  Quentin Tarantino would join the list of directors who have directed multiple Oscar winners with Django Unchained.  Sylvester Stallone would add on another sequel by earning a nomination for Creed.  The tidbit about Mike Mills became no longer true in 2016 which made me go back and realize Ron Underwood was also like that for seven years (from 1991, when the first nomination any of his films received was the win for Jack Palance in City Slickers until 1998 when Mighty Joe Young was nominated for Visual Effects).  Three more directors have had their films earn just one nomination and its for Supporting Actor (David Dobkin, Ryan Coogler, Sean Baker).  Fantasy has earned two more nominations (Birdman, The Shape of Water) and is now tied with Kids and Sci-Fi for lowest.  Drama has won only two of the six Oscars since 2011 but has earned 16 of the 30 nominations.  Moonlight won Picture and Supporting Actor so the decade streak continues.  All six Picture winners since 2011 have at least been nominated, tying the longest consecutive streak.  In 2013, for the first time, all five Supporting Actor nominees were from Picture nominees, but of course the Picture nominees had expanded.  Barkhad Abdi is another nominee who spoke often in a foreign language in his nomination (Captain Phillips where he spoke Somali) though again, it wasn’t actually a Foreign language film.  Picture has continued to be the biggest overlap with 22 of the 29 films nominated for Supporting Actor since 2011 earning a Picture nom.  William DaFoe easily lands at #1 for Most Critically Acclaimed Performance to not win the Oscar based on Consensus Awards Percentage.  Robert Duvall (four nominations), Jeff Bridges (four nominations) and Christoph Waltz (two wins) have all moved into the Top 10 list for Oscar points.  Both Duvall and Bridges earned two nominations in the 70’s and then after long breaks (19 years for Duvall, 26 for Bridges) earned two more, with long breaks as well between the third and fourth nominations (16 years for both).  Sam Rockwell became the latest winner to be the weakest of the five nominees.

BAFTA Notes:  It wasn’t notable enough to mention that the only pre-2011 Western to earn a nomination also won (Gene Hackman, 1992, Unforgiven) but then in 2012 the same thing happened again (Christoph Waltz, 2012, Django Unchained).  So, Westerns account for 4% of the winners but less than 1% of the nominees.  Since 2011, only one film has won Picture and Supporting Actor (and it also won British Film): Three Billboards.  Of the other five winners, only two others were even in Picture nominees.  Only three films in those six years earned no other nominations (Beasts of No Nation, All the Money in the World, The Florida Project).  In 2017, they again gave the award to the weakest of the nominees (Sam Rockwell).

Golden Globe Notes:  The longest stretch of Oscar-Globe agreement ran from 2007 to 2014.  Django Unchained would be the latest Globe film to win Supporting Actor while earning another Supporting Actor nomination.  In both 2013 and 2016 the Supporting Actor winner would be the only nominee without a Best Picture nomination.  Two more films would win Supporting Actor with their only nomination (Whiplash, Creed).  Three Billboards would become just the fourth film to win Supporting Actor and Actress; it would also be the first film since 2006 and the first Drama since 1986 to win Supporting Actor and Picture.  Christoph Waltz, Christopher Plummer and Robert Duvall would all go up to 120 points though only Waltz would do it win two wins.  Aaron-Taylor Johnson (Nocturnal Animals, 2016) lands on the list of Worst Globe winners.  Mahershala Ali and Willem Dafoe come in 2nd and 3rd for most acclaimed performances not to win the Globe.  Aaron Taylor-Johnson is the least acclaimed performance to win.  In both 2015 and 2016, the Globe winner was the worst of the nominees.  Aaron Taylor-Johnson winning the Globe for Nocturnal Animals while Michael Shannon would earn the Oscar nom adds to that list.

BFCA Notes:  Willem Dafoe crushes the Highest Critical Acclaim for a Nominee.  Philip Seymour Hoffman (The Master, 2012) and Sylvester Stallone (Creed, 2015) have both won the BFCA without either a SAG or Oscar win though Hoffman, like Church, won the Consensus and Stallone won the Globe.  Since 2011, Hoffman has gone up to 120 points by winning, where he still leads.  Also, Mark Ruffalo now has three nominations, Javier Bardem has added a nomination and Sam Rockwell has added a win to his previous nomination so there are three actors with 90 points.

SAG Notes:  Willem Dafoe again sets the Highest Critical Acclaim for a Nominee but just barely this time.  Idris Elba (Beasts of No Nation, 2015) sets a new mark for Lowest Critical Acclaim and is the only SAG winner to fail to earn an Oscar nomination.  Four more actors are up to 90 points (Javier Bardem, Tommy Lee Jones, Robert Duvall, Christian Bale), all with one win and one nomination.  Jacob Tremblay (Room, 2015) is the only SAG nominee since 2011 without any other noms.

Critics Awards Notes:  Willem Dafoe became the first actor to win all six critics awards and then of course won none of the awards groups after that.  That was after both J.K. Simmons (Whiplash, 2014) and Mahershala Ali (Moonlight, 2016) won five of six with the NBR again the lone hold out.

Nighthawk Notables:  Benedict Cumberbatch (Star Trek Into Darkness, 2013) is the Best Star Trek Villain and Javier Bardem (Skyfall, 2012) the Best Bond Villain.

Nighthawk Notes:  On the Absolute Points list, Philip Seymour Hoffman moved up to 408 points but Michael Caine moved into a tie with Claude Rains with 470 points.

The Nighthawk winners since 2011:

  • 2012:  Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained  (Oscar, BAFTA, Globe)
  • 2013:  Michael Fassbender, 12 Years a Slave  (Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA)
  • 2014:  Edward Norton, Birdman  (NBR, Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA)
  • 2015:  Mark Rylance, Bridge of Spies  (NYFC, NSFC, BSFC, Oscar, BAFTA, SAG, Globe, BFCA)
  • 2016:  Dev Patel, Lion  (BAFTA, Oscar, SAG, Globe, BFCA)
  • 2017:  Willem Dafoe, The Florida Project  (NYFC, LAFC, NSFC, BSFC, CFC, NBR, Oscar, SAG, BAFTA, Globe, BFCA)

Consensus Notes:  J.K. Simmons (Whiplash, 2014) won the same 10 awards that Waltz did.  Simmons and Sam Rockwell both join the list of those who win all five awards groups.  Since 2011, as you can see below, we’ve had two more blowouts (Simmons, Ali) and one more wide open race (2012).

Year Director AA GG crit BAFTA SAG BFCA RT WT N W % Rk
2012 Hoffman, Philip Seymour 30 30 48 30 30 60 228 207 6 2 17.88% 1
2012 Waltz, Christoph 60 60 60 180 162 3 3 13.99% 3
2012 Jones, Tommy Lee 30 30 30 60 30 180 165 5 1 14.25% 2
2012 McConaughy, Matthew 114 30 144 138 3 2 11.92% 4
2012 Arkin, Alan 30 30 30 30 30 150 135 5 0 11.66% 4
2012 Bardem, Javier 30 30 30 90 84 3 0 7.25% x
2012 De Niro, Robert 30 30 30 90 84 3 0 7.25% x
2012 DiCaprio, Leonardo 30 48 78 69 2 1 5.96% x
2012 Henry, Dwight 60 60 60 1 1 5.18% x
2012 Miller, Ezra 54 54 54 1 1 4.66% x
2013 Leto, Jared 60 60 168 60 60 408 378 7 7 31.03% 1
2013 Abdi, Barkhad 30 30 60 30 30 180 165 5 1 13.55% 2
2013 Fassbender, Michael 30 30 30 30 30 150 135 5 0 11.08% 3
2013 Franco, James 114 114 114 2 2 9.36% 4
2013 Gandolfini, James 54 30 30 114 108 3 1 8.87% 5
2013 Bruhl, Daniel 30 30 30 30 120 105 4 0 8.62% 5
2013 Cooper, Bradley 30 30 30 30 120 105 4 0 8.62% 5
2013 Forte, Will 48 48 48 1 1 3.94% x
2013 Damon, Matt 30 30 30 1 0 2.46% x
2013 Hill, Jonah 30 30 30 1 0 2.46% x
2014 Simmons, JK 60 60 276 60 60 60 576 546 10 10 48.40% 1
2014 Norton, Edward 30 30 48 30 30 30 198 183 6 1 16.22% 2
2014 Ruffalo, Mark 30 30 30 30 30 150 135 5 0 11.97% 3
2014 Hawke, Ethan 30 30 30 30 30 150 135 5 0 11.97% 3
2014 Duvall, Robert 30 30 30 30 120 105 4 0 9.31% 5
2014 Brolin, Josh 30 30 24 1 0 2.13% x
2015 Rylance, Mark 60 30 168 60 30 30 378 363 8 5 29.13% 1
2015 Stallone, Sylvester 30 60 48 60 198 168 4 3 13.48% 2
2015 Shannon, Michael 30 60 30 30 150 135 4 1 10.83% 3
2015 Bale, Christian 30 35 30 30 125 115 4 0 9.19% 4
2015 Elba, Idris 30 30 60 120 111 3 1 8.91% 5
2015 Dano, Paul 30 63 30 123 108 3 1 8.67% x
2015 Ruffalo, Mark 30 30 30 90 84 3 0 6.74% x
2015 Del Toro, Benicio 48 30 78 78 2 1 6.26% x
2015 Hardy, Tom 30 30 60 54 2 0 4.33% x
2015 Tremblay, Jacob 30 30 30 1 0 2.41% x
2016 Ali, Mahershala 60 30 276 30 60 60 516 495 10 8 41.84% 1
2016 Bridges, Jeff 30 30 48 30 30 30 198 183 6 1 15.47% 2
2016 Patel, Dev 30 30 60 30 30 180 165 5 1 13.95% 3
2016 Grant, Hugh 35 30 30 95 85 3 0 7.14% 4
2016 Hedges, Lucas 30 30 30 90 84 3 0 7.10% 5
2016 Taylor-Johnson, Aaron 60 30 90 72 2 1 6.09% x
2016 Shannon, Michael 30 30 60 54 2 0 4.56% x
2016 Helberg, Simon 30 30 21 1 0 1.78% x
2016 Foster, Ben 30 30 24 1 0 2.03% x
2017 Dafoe, Willem 30 30 324 30 30 30 474 459 11 6 41.80% 1
2017 Rockwell, Sam 60 60 60 60 60 300 270 5 5 24.59% 2
2017 Jenkins, Richard 30 30 30 30 120 105 4 0 9.56% 3
2017 Harrelson, Woody 30 30 30 90 90 3 0 8.20% 4
2017 Plummer, Christopher 30 30 30 90 81 3 0 7.38% 5
2017 Hammer, Armie 30 30 60 45 2 0 4.10% x
2017 Stuhlbarg, Michael 30 30 24 1 0 2.19% x
2017 Stewart, Patrick 30 30 24 1 0 2.19% x
2018 Grant, Hugh 30 30 30 1 0

 

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