April 2018


The posts for the next couple of months are going to be hopefully not too few or far between but they won’t be bunched up.  The Century of Film posts take a while to write and so I’m trying to put other ones between them, like RCM, Great Read (a series I’m almost out of) and Adapted Screenplay as well as the odd occasional post.  But I’m also doing that while balanced against preparing for our move to San Diego and while trying to watch and read as many things as I need for the Adapted Screenplay posts that are available from my local library system here but won’t be once I get to San Diego.  So the future posts are coming.  They just might be a bit slow.

RICHARD: You’re getting old. One day you’ll have me once too often.
HENRY: When? I’m fifty now. My God, boy, I’m the oldest man I know. I’ve got a decade on the Pope. (p 48-49)

My Top 10:

  1. The Lion in Winter
  2. Rosemary’s Baby
  3. Belle de Jour
  4. Closely Watched Trains
  5. The Odd Couple
  6. Hunger
  7. Rachel Rachel
  8. Pretty Poison
  9. The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
  10. War and Peace

Note:  My list is 14 long this year.  My #13 (The Fixer) and #14 (Oliver) are reviewed below because of award nominations.  The other two are listed down at the bottom.  You could make the case that 2001: A Space Odyssey should be listed but the Oscars treated it as original and I do the same.  You can find plenty of places on-line that explained the complicated history of its script. (more…)

The Tripods Trilogy:

  1. The White Mountains
  2. The City of Gold and Lead
  3. The Pool of Fire
  • Author:  John Christopher  (1922-2012)
  • Published:  1967 / 1968 / 1969
  • Publisher:  Hamish Hamilton
  • Pages:  650
  • First Line:  “Apart from the one in the church tower, there were five clocks in the village that kept reasonable time, and my father owned one of them.”
  • Last Lines:  “The air was cold but exhilarating.  A gust of wind scattered powdery snow from the face of the Jungfrau.  ‘Yes,’ I said, ‘I’ll leave my seas and islands.'”
  • Film:  television version  (1984)
  • First Read:  1987  (as a book)

(more…)

Richard Taylor has fun with one of his Oscar winning creations.

A Century of Film
Makeup

Makeup has long been a part of film.  It was a key part of films back in the Silent Era with people like Lon Chaney doing their own makeup work.  Yet, somehow, it took until the 37th Academy Awards before they though it was worth rewarding and another 17 years before they decided it should be a permanent competitive award.  Is it a coincidence that the BAFTAs followed suit just a year later?  There is more on the various awards listed below.  But I should note that the Academy of Science-Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films (the Saturn Awards) started giving out their own Makeup Award in 1973, long before the other groups, so kudos to them even if I don’t track their awards. (more…)