Congrats to the single best collection of five performances ever nominated for Best Actress.

The record didn’t get tied this year, but it was close.  And for the first time in 13 years, I have actually seen all the Best Picture nominees already, even if I only predicted eight of the nine (see the end here).

  • The Shape of Water dominates with 13 nominations, one short of the all-time record, five more than any other film (see more about several points down).
  • Last year, all of the BP nominees earned at least three nominations and no film without a BP nom earned more than three (and only Jackie earned that many).  This year, The Post is in the Picture race with just 2 nominations while Blade Runner 2049 has five, Star Wars: The Last Jedi and Mudbound have four and I Tonya and Baby Driver each have three and aren’t in the BP race.
  • Phantom Thread is the first film in the Best Picture lineup without a Globe, BFCA, PGA or BAFTA nomination since Blind Side and just the third since 1979.  But, because of its Oscar nomination, the nine Oscar nominees are also the Top 9 in the Consensus Award as well.
  • For the second straight year, seven of the nine nominees are released in November and December.  But, for the first time since 2011, two of the nominees were released during the summer.
  • While The Post is the fourth Tom Hanks film this decade to be nominated for Best Picture (all in odd years), it’s the first nomination for a Meryl Streep film since The Hours in 2002.
  • I could tell you that both Tom Hanks and Daniel Day-Lewis have now been in eight nominees and each have been in one winner and each of them have already starred in nominees with their same director (Hanks has done it twice before with Spielberg, Day-Lewis once with Anderson).  But would you remember that Day-Lewis’ winning film was his tiny role in Gandhi?
  • I got eight right in Picture as you can see.  The predictions were a nightmare, since I got the first category they announced completely right (Production Design) and then almost never again.  I was 5/5 in Actress and Sound Editing and 3/5 in Director, Score, Song and Foreign Film but 4/5 in all the others.
  • Warner Bros had their 13 year streak snapped last year but they’re back with Dunkirk this year.  Fox stretches their streak to 12 years with a regular nomination for The Post and two nominations for Fox Searchlight (Shape of Water, Three Billboards).  Focus Features also has two nominees for the first time (Darkest Hour, Phantom Thread).
  • What does this year have in common with 2003?  There are only three films nominated for Picture, Director and Screenplay and one of them (The Shape of Water, Return of the King) has more nominations than the other two combined (Get Out, Lady Bird / Mystic River, Lost in Translation)
  • The Directors Branch continue to buck the precursors, nominating, for the third time in four years, a director who was passed over by the DGA, BFCA, BAFTA and Globe.  But this time, with P.T. Anderson being the beneficiary, I’m not complaining.
  • This class of directors join the 2014 class as the only ones since 2007 where none of them already have won an Oscar.  Ironically, 2007 was when Anderson earned his first nomination.
  • The Post is Spielberg’s 25th film to earn an Oscar nomination, a new record.  He is the only director to direct five Oscar nominated films in four different decades.  It also increases his already record total of total Oscar nominations for his film to 132.  It also moves Spielberg’s films up to 27 nominations this decade, putting him in first place with one more than David O. Russell.
  • The Post, though, is also the third Spielberg film to earn Picture without Director or Screenplay nominations, making him the first director with that many since the 60’s.
  • It again means that 2007 was the last year without a nomination for a Spielberg, Scorsese or Eastwood film, which of course was also the last year when none of them made a film.
  • 2012 continues to be the only year of the expanded Best Picture nominations where all five films with a Director nomination also earn a writing nomination.  This year is even stranger as two of the Director nominated films are passed over for The Big Sick, whose writing nomination was the film’s lone nomination.
  • After a combined 13 losses without a win as a director at the DGA, Oscars, Globe and BAFTAs, James Ivory is the odds-on favorite to win the Oscar for writing Call Me By Your Name.
  • The Oscars go with Logan as the fifth Oscar nominee which means they match the WGA in Adapted Screenplay for the first time since 1990.
  • With his eighth nomination, Denzel Washington goes up to 335 points and passed Hoffman, Pacino and De Niro into seventh place in Oscar history.  With his sixth nomination, Daniel Day-Lewis also passes Pacino and De Niro and moves into a tie with Hoffman for eighth place at 315 points.
  • On the other end of the spectrum are our two Best Actor nominees who haven’t even hit 30 yet: Timothée Chalemet and Daniel Kaluuya (both of whom had their names butchered during a nomination announcement that really didn’t look good).
  • Continuing along those lines, Meryl Streep won two Oscars almost a decade before Margot Robbie and over a decade before Saoirse Ronan (also both under 30) were even born.
  • And still on those lines, Ronan, born in 1994, earns her third Oscar nominations.  Lesley Manville, Laurie Metcalf and Allison Janney, all born in the mid-to-late 1950’s are earning their first Oscar nominations.
  • With her nomination this year, this is the 7th time that Streep has earned back-to-back Oscar nominations.
  • Christopher Plummer, who didn’t get his first Oscar nomination until he was 80, just got his third.
  • Willem Dafoe, on the other hand, likes to pace his out.  He got his first at 31, his second at 45 and now his third at 62.
  • Both Actor and Actress have multiple former winners among the nominees.  Supporting Actress doesn’t even have multiple former nominees.  But all four acting categories for the third straight year all have a former winner among them.
  • For the first time since 2012 and only the second time since 1998, two films earn the big 5 Tech nominations (Editing, Cinematography, Score, Production Design, Sound Mixing): The Shape of Water and Dunkirk.
  • The Oscars actually nominate two films for Editing that aren’t Picture nominees, as many as in all the years of the expanded BP nominees combined.
  • For the second straight year, the Oscars agree with the ASC on the five Cinematography nominations.  Before that, they had only agreed with the ASC thrice ever (1996, 2007, 2010).
  • After all the first time Cinematography nominees last year, Roger Deakins is back at his 14th try to win an Oscar.  The nomination alone moves him to 350 points and a tie for 5th place, even without a win.  Bruno Delbonnel is also in for his fifth attempt to win.  Joining them is Rachel Morrison, the first female to ever be nominated (I originally incorrectly listed her as the first black female, which I thought I had read but didn’t have time to check before I posted this, but she is apparently not black and the female thing is a much bigger deal in a branch that has always been notoriously slow to change – credit F.T. and Anand for correcting me on that — I think I conflated her in my head with Dee Rees who did become the first black woman to be nominated for Adapted Screenplay).
  • John Williams has now been nominated five times just for Star Wars films.  He’s up against Hans Zimmer and Alexandre Desplat, both of whom have Oscars.  It’s the first time all three have competed against each other even though at least one of them has been nominated every year since 2007.
  • Richard King earns his sixth Oscar nomination for Sound Editing and moves up to 180 points and sixth place.  If he wins for his work on Dunkirk as is expected, he will go up to 200 points and a tie for fifth place.
  • The Oscars continue to hate LEGO movies, but they still break new ground by nominating Ferdinand, the first Animated nominee without an Annie nomination since 2004.
  • Boss BabyBoss Baby?  What the fuck were you people thinking?
  • Blue Sky finally earns a second nomination, 15 years after their first.  This just shows how weaker the category was this year than last year.
  • For the sixth straight year, there are 3 European Foreign Film nominations.  But for the only second time ever, there are no nominees from Western Europe (two from Eastern Europe and one from Scandinavia).
  • As F.T. has already pointed out, for the second straight year, the BFCA-Globe winner doesn’t even get a nomination, though at least they shortlisted In the Fade.
  • For the first time in four years, the Oscars don’t nominate a song from a documentary.  Instead, they give Diane Warren her ninth nomination.
  • In fact, while Best Song has the Oscar winning married Lopez couple, the Oscar winning team of Pasek and Paul, Warren has more Oscar nominations than all of them combined (nine to their eight) and has never won.
  • I, Tonya becomes the only film on the Makeup shortlist to earn BAFTA, BFCA and guild nominations but fail to earn an Oscar nom other than American Hustle.

I may add some more to this later in the day.  Right now, I’m off to the movies and because it’s raining, I want to get going.  I’m actually off to see Last Jedi for the fourth time because of the 39 films nominated this year, I’ve already seen 25 of them, am committed to not seeing Ferdinand without Veronica and Thomas and don’t really want to go see Molly’s Game today (there are no other choices in theaters in Boston at the moment).

Further bits of trivia follow:

  • Lebanon has become the latest country to finally earn an Oscar nomination in its 12th submission.  But there are still 14 countries who have submitted more times than that that have never received a nomination, most notably Portugal (32) and Romania (31).
  • GKIDS earns an Animated Film nomination for the fifth straight year.  Thanks to DreamWorks’ constant shifting distributors, GKIDS is the only studio aside from Disney with a streak longer than two years.
  • I have been asked in the Comments field how this year stacks up on my ranked list.  It’s, at first look, #7 all-time and by far the best of any year with more than five nominees.  The average nominee ranks at 92.33, the third highest ever, behind only 2002 and 2007, both of which were all **** films.
  • I probably should have said something about the fact that the Academy finally nominated two of the most visionary directors around: Christopher Nolan and Guillermo del Toro.  But it seemed pretty obvious that they would be nominated (though it seemed that way for Nolan in 2010 and he wasn’t).
  • While Sound Editing has matched Sound Mixing before, back in 1986 and 1993, when all three of the SE nominees were among the SM nominees, this is the first time since Sound Editing became a regular category and went up to five nominees that it has matched Sound Mixing perfectly 5/5.