Bring on the cave troll.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category (or Globe, in the Globes section).  Films in blue were nominated.  Films (or directors) in olive are links to earlier posts that I don’t want to have show up in blue and be mistaken for a nominee.  Films with an asterisk (*) were Consensus nominees (a scale I put together based on the various awards) while those with a double asterisk (**) were the Consensus winners.

I’m listing the top 20 in the categories (because that’s how many **** films there are) but only the top 5 earn Nighthawk nominations.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring  *
  2. The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain
  3. Moulin Rouge  *
  4. Mulholland Drive  **
  5. Memento
  6. Gosford Park
  7. In the Bedroom  *
  8. The Royal Tenenbaums
  9. Vanilla Sky
  10. Amores Perros
  11. The Man Who Wasn’t There
  12. The Others
  13. Ghost World
  14. Monster’s Ball
  15. A.I. Artificial Intelligence
  16. The Princess and the Warrior
  17. Black Hawk Down
  18. The Devil’s Backbone
  19. Monsters Inc.
  20. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

Analysis:  Mulholland Drive is the first film since Day for Night (and the last to-date) to win the Consensus without an Oscar nom.
This isn’t just the best Top 20 to-date (though it is that).  It’s the best Top 20 by 25 points.  It is tied for the best Top 10 to-date (a 94.8 average).  It sets a new high for films #11-20 (90.5 average); the only years since with an #11-20 average over 90 are 2005 and 2007.  It has a Top 20 average of 92.65, easily beating the previous high from 1994 of 91.4.  Only two years since have had a higher Top 20: 2002 and 2005.
With four nominees in the Top 7, the Oscar Score is 79.5, the highest since 1982.
A Beautiful Mind wins Picture, Director and Adapted Screenplay and none of those wins rank in my Top 20.  This is the first time that all three of those winners fail to make the Top 20 since 1958, when Gigi won all three.  If you think I’m splitting hairs by singling out Adapted Screenplay, I will point out that the only three times in Oscar history that the Original Screenplay winner doesn’t make my Top 20, the Director winner finished in the top 7.
This is the complete list of **** films.  There is a four point drop between #20 and #21.

  • Best Director
  1. Peter Jackson  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)  *
  2. David Lynch  (Mulholland Drive)  **
  3. Jean-Pierre Jeunet  (The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain)
  4. Baz Luhrmann  (Moulin Rouge)  *
  5. Christopher Nolan  (Memento)
  6. Ridley Scott  (Black Hawk Down)
  7. Robert Altman  (Gosford Park)  *
  8. Joel Coen  (The Man Who Wasn’t There)
  9. Steven Spielberg  (A.I. Artificial Intelligence)
  10. Alejandro Amenábar  (The Others)
  11. Cameron Crowe  (Vanilla Sky)
  12. Alejandro González Iñárritu  (Amores Perros)
  13. Tom Tykwer  (The Princess and the Warrior)
  14. Todd Field  (In the Bedroom)
  15. Guillermo del Toro  (The Devil’s Backbone)
  16. Marc Forster  (Monster’s Ball)
  17. Wes Anderson  (The Royal Tenenbaums)
  18. Steven Soderbergh  (Ocean’s Eleven)
  19. Patrice LeConte  (The Widow of St. Pierre)
  20. Jonathan Glazer  (Sexy Beast)

Analysis:  David Lynch becomes only the second director to win the Consensus without a DGA nomination since the inception of the DGA Awards.  Robert Altman, in 2nd place, also fails to earn a DGA nom.  Lynch is also the first Consensus winner since 1989 without a BAFTA nom.  He does this partially because of a lack of consensus in the awards groups (the Oscar, BAFTA and Globe go to three different directors) and because he wins three critics awards.  The five Consensus nominees finish with 5% of each other for the first time since 1968 and the last time through at least 2016.
Baz Luhrmann earns his only Nighthawk nomination.  Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Christopher Nolan earns their first noms.  Peter Jackson earns his second nom and the first of three straight wins.  David Lynch earns his third nom.
With, again, four nominees in the Top 7, the Oscar Score is 77.5, the highest since 1994, although the Oscars blew it by giving the Oscar to what was by far the weakest of the nominees.

  • Best Adapted Screenplay:
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring  *
  2. In the Bedroom
  3. Ghost World  *
  4. Vanilla Sky
  5. Last Orders
  6. Shrek  *
  7. Ocean’s Eleven
  8. A.I. Artificial Intelligence
  9. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  10. The Pledge
  11. Black Hawk Down
  12. The Tailor of Panama
  13. Iris
  14. Bridget Jones’s Diary  *
  15. Tape
  16. The Shipping News
  17. Liam
  18. The Deep End
  19. The Road Home

Analysis:  Having just missed out on a nomination in the very tough year of 1994, Peter Jackson (and Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens) earns his first Nighthawk win for writing, though he won’t actually win three in a row.  Cameron Crowe earns his fifth writing nomination, his first for Adapted since 1982 (when he was adapting his own novel) and his last to date.

  • Best Original Screenplay:
  1. The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain  *
  2. Memento  **
  3. Gosford Park  **
  4. Monster’s Ball
  5. The Royal Tenenbaums  *
  6. Amores Perros
  7. The Others
  8. The Man Who Wasn’t There  *
  9. The Princess and the Warrior
  10. Mulholland Drive
  11. Monsters Inc.
  12. The Anniversary Party
  13. The Devil’s Backbone
  14. Sexy Beast
  15. Faithless
  16. Last Resort
  17. Moulin Rouge
  18. Divided We Fall
  19. The Widow of St. Pierre
  20. Donnie Darko

Analysis:  Wes Anderson earns his second writing Nighthawk nomination and Christopher Nolan earns his first.
This is the third straight close Consensus race in this category and this is the closest.  Both Gosford Park and Memento win 4 awards among 6 nominations and they tie in their raw score and Gosford Park only wins with the weighted score.  To be fair, Memento was ineligible at the WGA and might have won the Consensus if not for that.
This is the second best Top 5 of all-time, behind only 1999.  It really kills me to limit it to five.  The Top 10 also rivals 1999 for the best of all-time.  When a brilliantly written Coen Brothers film finishes in 8th place you know you have a great list.
This year also earns a perfect 100 Oscar Score, the first in this category since 1959.  It is the best group of five Oscar nominees in the history of this category.

  • Best Actor:
  1. Tom Wilkinson  (In the Bedroom)  *
  2. Billy Bob Thornton  (The Man Who Wasn’t There)  *
  3. Guy Pearce  (Memento)
  4. Billy Bob Thornton  (Monster’s Ball)  *
  5. Tom Cruise  (Vanilla Sky)
  6. Russell Crowe  (A Beautiful Mind)  **
  7. Gene Hackman  (The Royal Tenenbaums)  *
  8. Elijah Wood  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)
  9. Haley Joel Osment  (A.I. Artificial Intelligence)
  10. Jack Nicholson  (The Pledge)
  11. Bunno Furmann  (The Princess and the Warrior)
  12. Ewan McGregor  (Moulin Rouge)
  13. Michael Caine  (Last Orders)
  14. Alan Cumming  (The Anniversary Party)
  15. Will Smith  (Ali)
  16. Brian Cox  (L.I.E.)
  17. Kevin Spacey  (The Shipping News)
  18. George Clooney  (Ocean’s Eleven)
  19. Kevin Kline  (Life as a House)
  20. Paddy Considine  (Last Resort)

Analysis:  For the second time in three years, Russell Crowe wins the Consensus and loses the Oscar, while in the year in between, he won the Oscar and didn’t win the Consensus.  Crowe’s win over Denzel Washington at the Consensus Awards is the closest finish since 1988.  I still think Denzel’s Oscar is one of the worst acting Oscars the Academy has ever awarded.
This is the only Nighthawk nomination for Guy Pearce.  It’s the first nom (and first win) for Tom Wilkinson.  It’s the second nom for Russell Crowe (he earns a Nighthawk nom because of the multiple nominations for Thornton).  It’s the second and third nominations for Billy Bob Thornton.  It’s the third nom for Tom Cruise.
The Oscar for Denzel’s ridiculous over-the-top hammy performance doesn’t effect the Oscar Score, but the nomination for Denzel and for Sean Penn (for his over-rated turn in I am Sam) do lead to an Oscar Score of 54.1, the first time this category has earned below a 70 since 1957, the first time below 60 since 1948 and the lowest score in the category since 1932.

  • Best Actress
  1. Sissy Spacek  (In the Bedroom)  **
  2. Audrey Tautou  (The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain)
  3. Naomi Watts  (Mulholland Drive)
  4. Nicole Kidman  (The Others)  *
  5. Halle Berry  (Monster’s Ball)  *
  6. Judi Dench  (Iris)  *
  7. Nicole Kidman  (Moulin Rouge)  *
  8. Franka Potente  (The Princess and the Warrior)
  9. Tilda Swinton  (The Deep End)
  10. Thora Birch  (Ghost World)
  11. Jennifer Jason Leigh  (The Anniversary Party)
  12. Renee Zellweger  (Bridget Jones’s Diary)  *
  13. Charlotte Rampling  (Under the Sand)
  14. Kelly MacDonald  (Gosford Park)
  15. Zhang Ziyi  (The Road Home)
  16. Dina Korzun  (Last Resort)
  17. Juliette Binoche  (The Widow of St. Pierre)
  18. Cate Blanchett  (Charlotte Gray)
  19. Molly Parker  (The Center of the World)
  20. Anjelica Huston  (The Royal Tenenbaums)

Analysis:  Halle Berry earns her only Nighthawk nom.  Audrey Tautou and Naomi Watts earns their first noms.  Nicole Kidman earns her second nom.  After a 19 year gap, Sissy Spacek earns her sixth nom.
This year ties 1950 for the best Top 5 to-date, though it will actually be beaten out by 2002.  It says something about the number of great roles here that several of the years that rival this year for the best in this category (1950, 1973, 2002) have films with multiple lead actresses performances while this year has no film like that.

  • Best Supporting Actor:
  1. Ian McKellen  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)  *
  2. Ben Kingsley  (Sexy Beast)  *
  3. Steve Buscemi  (Ghost World)  *
  4. Jude Law  (A.I. Artificial Intelligence)
  5. Ian Holm  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)
  6. Hugh Bonneville  (Iris)
  7. Jim Broadbent  (Iris)  **
  8. Jim Broadbent  (Moulin Rouge)  **
  9. Clive Owen  (Gosford Park)
  10. Christopher Lee  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)
  11. Robbie Coltrane  (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone)
  12. Jon Voight  (Ali)  *
  13. Hugo Weaving  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)
  14. Viggo Mortenson  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)
  15. Justin Theroux  (Mulholland Drive)
  16. Heath Ledger  (Monster’s Ball)
  17. Hugh Grant  (Bridget Jones’s Diary)
  18. Bill Murray  (The Royal Tenenbaums)
  19. Noah Taylor  (Vanilla Sky)
  20. Bob Hoskins  (Last Orders)

Analysis:  These are the only Nighthawk nominations for Steve Buscemi, and, surprisingly, Jude Law.  It’s the third nom for Ben Kingsley.  It’s the fourth nom for Ian Holm.  It’s the fourth nom and second win for Ian McKellen, all in the space of just seven years.

  • Best Supporting Actress:
  1. Helen Mirren  (Gosford Park)  **
  2. Maggie Smith  (Gosford Park)
  3. Marisa Tomei  (In the Bedroom)
  4. Cameron Diaz  (Vanilla Sky)  *
  5. Cate Blanchett  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)  *
  6. Kate Winslet  (Iris)  *
  7. Eileen Atkins  (Gosford Park)
  8. Jennifer Connelly  (A Beautiful Mind)  *
  9. Judi Dench  (The Shipping News)
  10. Helen Mirren  (Last Orders)
  11. Gwyneth Paltrow  (The Royal Tenenbaums)
  12. Carrie-Anne Moss  (Memento)
  13. Cate Blanchett  (The Man Who Cried)  *
  14. Frances O’Connor  (A.I. Artificial Intelligence)
  15. Mina Badie  (The Anniversary Party)
  16. Cate Blanchett  (The Shipping News)  *
  17. Maggie Gyllenhaal  (Donnie Darko)
  18. Illeana Douglas  (Ghost World)
  19. Frances McDormand  (The Man Who Wasn’t There)
  20. Fionnula Flanagan  (The Others)

Analysis:  Jennifer Connelly actually has a higher raw Consensus score but Helen Mirren’s weighted score is a few points higher.
Marisa Tomei earns her first Nighthawk nomination.  Cameron Diaz earns her second nom.  Cate Blanchett earns her third nom.  Helen Mirren earns her fifth nom and her first win.  Maggie Smith earns her eighth and final nom; she goes up to 350 points and moves into 6th place.
This is the second best Top 5 to-date, behind only 1996.
For the fourth year in a row, this is the saving grace among the acting categories, this time (with a 91.9), the only one over 85.  It’s also the best group of Oscar nominees to-date, though, again, that will be beaten by 2002.

  • Best Editing:
  1. Memento
  2. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  3. The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain
  4. Black Hawk Down
  5. Mulholland Drive
  6. Amores Perros
  7. Vanilla Sky
  8. The Others
  9. The Royal Tenenbaums
  10. Moulin Rouge
  11. Gosford Park
  12. The Princess and the Warrior
  13. The Man Who Wasn’t There
  14. Last Orders
  15. The Devil’s Backbone
  16. Ocean’s Eleven
  17. Monster’s Ball
  18. In the Bedroom
  19. Ghost World
  20. A.I. Artificial Intelligence

Analysis:  This is the best Top 5 to-date and though it will later be tied (by 2006), it remains the best Top 5 of all-time.

  • Best Cinematography:
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring  *
  2. Mulholland Drive
  3. The Man Who Wasn’t There  **
  4. Moulin Rouge  *
  5. Black Hawk Down
  6. The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain  *
  7. Vanilla Sky
  8. A.I. Artificial Intelligence
  9. The Others
  10. Memento
  11. The Devil’s Backbone
  12. The Princess and the Warrior
  13. In the Bedroom
  14. The Road Home
  15. Amores Perros
  16. Sexy Beast
  17. Gosford Park
  18. In the Mood for Love
  19. The Shipping News
  20. Lagaan

Analysis:  As is this case with many people on Lord of the Rings, Andrew Lesnie wins the first of three straight Nighthawks.  Roger Deakins earns his seventh nomination, yet again with the Coen Brothers and even though he doesn’t have a win, he moves up to 6th place in points all-time with 175, though it will be another six years before he gets his next nomination, the longest gap of his career.  Deakins does win the Consensus even though he still (through 2016) has never won an Oscar (or a Nighthawk).
This is the best Top 5 since 1980 and the second best to-date.  With all five nominees in my Top 6, the Oscar Score is 95.1, the highest since the perfect score way back in 1950 (when there were only three nominees and two different categories).  This is also the best group of five Oscar nominees to-date (though it will be matched in 2002).
This is the final year of a four year stretch where the Academy gives the Oscar to my #1 film in this category, the longest such streak in this category’s history.

  • Best Original Score:
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  2. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  3. The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain
  4. The Others
  5. The Man Who Wasn’t There
  6. Monsters Inc.
  7. The Road Home
  8. A.I. Artificial Intelligence
  9. A Beautiful Mind
  10. The Shipping News
  11. The Princess and the Warrior
  12. Planet of the Apes
  13. Vanilla Sky
  14. The Pledge
  15. Mulholland Drive
  16. Gosford Park
  17. Faraon
  18. Black Hawk Down
  19. The Deep End

Analysis:  Lots of directors are also writers, but Alejandro Amenabar becomes that rare director to earn a Nighthawk nomination for composing.  Howard Shore earns his second nomination, but his first of three straight wins (and four straight nominations).  Carter Burwell earns his fourth nomination.  John Williams continues to rack up nominations and is now at 825 points, some 375 more than any other composer.
It’s rare to have three scores that I have played this many times.  It kills me to choose between them.  They help make this the best Top 5 since 1993.

  • Best Sound:
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  2. Moulin Rouge
  3. Black Hawk Down
  4. A.I. Artificial Intelligence
  5. The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain
  6. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  7. Memento
  8. Planet of the Apes
  9. Pearl Harbor
  10. Ocean’s Eleven
  11. No Man’s Land
  12. Mulholland Drive
  13. Ali
  14. The Man Who Wasn’t There
  15. The Mummy Returns
  16. Monsters Inc.
  17. Gosford Park
  18. The Princess and the Warrior
  19. Amores Perros

Analysis:  This year ties 1980 for the best Top 5 to-date.  With all five nominees in my Top 9, the Oscar Score is 92.5, the highest in five years and the fourth highest to-date.  It’s also the best group of Oscar nominees since 1991.

  • Best Art Direction:
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  2. Moulin Rouge
  3. Gosford Park
  4. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  5. The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain
  6. Mulholland Drive
  7. A.I. Artificial Intelligence
  8. The Royal Tenenbaums
  9. The Man Who Wasn’t There
  10. Vanilla Sky
  11. Ocean’s Eleven
  12. The Others
  13. The Golden Bowl
  14. Faraon
  15. The Affair of the Necklace
  16. The Luzhin Defence
  17. Lagaan
  18. The Devil’s Backbone
  19. Zoolander
  20. The Man Who Cried

Analysis:  A perfect 100 Oscar Score, matching 1996, though these five nominees score two fewer points than that five did, only making this the second best group of Oscar nominees in history.
I don’t begrudge the Academy or anyone else who has Moulin Rouge as their #1.  It’s unfortunate the two films came out in the same year.

  • Best Visual Effects
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  2. A.I. Artificial Intelligence
  3. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  4. Planet of the Apes
  5. Moulin Rouge
  6. Pearl Harbor
  7. Black Hawk Down
  8. The Mummy Returns
  9. The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain
  10. Spy Kids
  11. Lara Croft: Tomb Raider

Analysis:  This is the second best Top 5 to-date, behind only 1997.  It will be beaten by 2002 though.  With the third nominee down at #6, the Oscar Score is 92.0, the best in six years.  But the group of three nominees is the best to-date (with the exception of 1979, but that year had five nominees).
This is actually the first time in five years that the Oscar and Nighthawk go to the same film in this category.
Films in green were semi-finalists at the Oscars.

  • Best Sound Editing
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  2. Black Hawk Down
  3. A.I. Artificial Intelligence
  4. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  5. Moulin Rouge
  6. Pearl Harbor
  7. Planet of the Apes
  8. Monsters Inc.
  9. The Mummy Returns
  10. Spy Kids
  11. Ali
  12. The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain
  13. Lara Croft: Tomb Raider

Analysis:  This is also the second best Top 5 to-date, again behind only 1997.  It will be thumped by 2002.
The Oscars didn’t do as well, however.  With neither of their nominees making my Top 5 (yes, there are just the two), the Oscar Score is just 52.9, the only Tech category that scores below a 74 this year.  It’s the lowest Oscar Score in this category in five years.  It’s especially embarrassing for the Oscars when you consider their list of semi-finalists.
Films in green were semi-finalists at the Oscars.

  • Best Costume Design:
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  2. Moulin Rouge
  3. Gosford Park
  4. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  5. Lagaan
  6. The Man Who Wasn’t There
  7. The Affair of the Necklace
  8. The Golden Bowl
  9. Faraon
  10. The Others
  11. The Widow of St. Pierre
  12. The Man Who Cried
  13. Divided We Fall
  14. Planet of the Apes
  15. The Romanovs: The Imperial Family
  16. From Hell
  17. Zoolander
  18. The Road Home
  19. The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain
  20. The Luzhin Defence

Analysis:  In spite of a magnificent top two (like with Art Direction, I can’t begrudge the Oscar or anyone choosing Moulin Rouge), the Top 5 is not all that high.
With all five Oscar nominees in my Top 7, the Oscar Score is a fantastic 97.3, less than half a point behind the record setting year of 1997.

  • Best Makeup
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  2. Moulin Rouge
  3. Planet of the Apes
  4. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
  5. A.I. Artificial Intelligence
  6. Vanilla Sky
  7. Black Hawk Down
  8. A Beautiful Mind
  9. Mulholland Drive
  10. Hedwig and the Angry Inch
  11. The Devil’s Backbone
  12. The Mummy Returns
  13. Zoolander
  14. Ali
  15. Amores Perros
  16. Spy Kids

Analysis:  This year ties both 1998 and 1999 for the best Top 5 to-date.  All of them will be thoroughly beaten by 2005.
With all three Oscar nominees in my Top 8, the Oscar Score is 84.0, the third highest score to-date.
This is the second year in a row that the Oscar and Nighthawk go to the same film in this category.  Not only is that the first time with back-to-back agreements since 1991-92, but it’s the last time it has happened in back-to-back years through at least 2017.
The films in green were Oscar semi-finalists.

  • Best Original Song:
  1. “May It Be”  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)
  2. Forever May Not Be Long Enough”  (The Mummy Returns)
  3. If I Didn’t Have You”  (Monsters Inc.)
  4. In Dreams”  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)
  5. Vanilla Sky”  (Vanilla Sky)
  6. I Fall Apart”  (Vanilla Sky)
  7. Until”  (Kate and Leopold)

Analysis:  Oscars.org, when it existed, listed songs from different films.  It listed 42 songs from 33 different films.  I have seen 23 of those films, accounting for 29 songs.  Before looking at that list, I had never realized the Live song (which I have had on CD for well over a decade) was eligible, because it was also released on their album V.
I have gone ahead and decided not to include “The Ground Beneath Her Feet” from Million Dollar Hotel (the film wasn’t Oscar eligible, but was listed on oscars.org) since the lyrics, by Salman Rushdie, appeared originally in his novel by the same name.  If I had included it, it would have been my #1 by a long way and would have cost Fellowship an award.
One of the few categories where this year doesn’t reach all-time heights, though it is still better than the year before.
The Oscar Score of 65.6 (I don’t give any points to the fifth nominee, that dumb song from Pearl Harbor) may be one of the weakest Oscar Scores of the year but it’s still the highest score in this category in six years.

  • Best Animated Film:
  1. Monsters Inc.  *
  2. Shrek  **

Analysis:  It’s the first Nighthawk nomination and win for Aardman (because it’s their first feature film), who will also win in 2005 and 2006 and will eventually have the fourth most points, behind only Disney, Pixar and Ghibli.
Ironically, given that this is the year the Oscars finally began this category, Monsters Inc. is the weakest winner since 1998 and there won’t be a weaker one again until 2006.
It’s the first year of this category and it scores a perfect 100 since the only two films I think are worthy of nomination are both nominated.
Much more about this race can be found here.

  • Best Foreign Film:
  1. The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain  *
  2. Spirited Away
  3. Y tu mamá también  **
  4. The Devil’s Backbone
  5. Millennium Actress
  6. Happy Times
  7. Metropolis
  8. No Man’s Land  *
  9. Baran
  10. Elling
  11. Shaolin Soccer

note:  Films in orange were submitted to the Academy but not nominated.

Analysis:  This choice kills me.  How do I decide between two brilliant films that are both among my absolute favorite films of all-time?
For the first time, Mexico earns two nominations in the same year.  Japan earns two nominations for the first time since 1989.  France wins for the first time in five years.
Alfonso Cuarón earns his only nomination (because he starts regularly making films in English).  Satoshi Kon and Guillermo del Toro earns their first nominations.  Jean-Pierre Jeunet earns his second nom and first win.  Hayao Miyazaki makes his best film but fails to win, instead earning his seventh nomination, going up to 200 points and tying Jean Renoir for 5th place.
Spirited Away is the second best #2 of all-time, behind only Wild Strawberries.  Y tu mamá también is the best #3 since 1973 and the fourth best ever.  The top three are the third best of all-time, behind only 1957 and the combined year of 1912-26.  Even with the six point drop to The Devil’s Backbone, it’s still the third best Top 4 and with another four point drop to Millennium Actress it’s still tied for the fourth best Top 5.  Films 7 through 10 are all weak ***.5 but it’s still good enough to be the 5th best Top 10 to-date and the 8th best all-time (though it will be soundly beaten by each of the next three years).
Y tu mamá también earns the Consensus win but all of its awards are actually from 2002.  If it was pushed to 2002, it would win there and No Man’s Land would win here, although if we did that, you would also really need to push Amores Perros here and it would win the Consensus.  Ah, the fun of different eligibility years.  Y tu mamá también earns 8 nominations, which won’t be matched again until 2011.

By Film:

note:  They’re in points order.  You get twice as many points for a win as for a nomination.  Hopefully your math skills will let you figure out the system.

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring  (755)
    • Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress, Editing, Cinematography, Original Score, Sound, Art Direction, Visual Effects, Sound Editing, Costume Design, Makeup, Original Song, Original Song
  • The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain   (340)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actress, Editing, Original Score, Sound, Art Direction, Foreign Film
  • Moulin Rouge  (225)
    • Picture, Director, Cinematography, Sound, Art Direction, Visual Effects, Sound Editing, Costume Design, Makeup
  • Memento  (220)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor, Editing
  • In the Bedroom  (210)
    • Adapted Screenplay, Actor, Actress, Supporting Actress
  • Muholland Drive  (180)
    • Picture, Director, Actress, Editing, Cinematography
  • Gosford Park  (165)
    • Original Screenplay, Supporting Actress, Supporting Actress, Art Direction, Costume Design
  • Vanilla Sky  (115)
    • Adapted Screenplay, Actor, Supporting Actress, Original Song
  • Monster’s Ball  (110)
    • Original Screenplay, Actor, Actress
  • Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone  (110)
    • Original Score, Art Direction, Visual Effects, Sound Editing, Costume Design, Makeup
  • A.I. Artificial Intelligence  (100)
    • Supporting Actor, Sound, Visual Effects, Sound Editing, Makeup
  • Black Hawk Down  (90)
    • Editing, Cinematography, Sound, Sound Editing
  • The Man Who Wasn’t There  (85)
    • Actor, Cinematography, Original Score
  • Ghost World  (70)
    • Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actor
  • The Others  (60)
    • Actress, Original Score
  • Monsters Inc.  (50)
    • Original Song, Animated Film
  • Last Orders  (40)
    • Adapted Screenplay
  • The Royal Tenenbaums  (40)
    • Original Screenplay
  • A Beautiful Mind  (35)
    • Actor
  • Sexy Beast  (30)
    • Supporting Actor
  • Planet of the Apes  (30)
    • Visual Effects, Makeup
  • Shrek  (20)
    • Animated Film
  • Amores Perros  (25)
    • Foreign Film (2000)
  • The Princess and the Warrior  (25)
    • Foreign Film (2000)
  • Faithless  (25)
    • Foreign Film (2000)
  • The Widow of St. Pierre  (20)
    • Foreign Film (2000)
  • The Devil’s Backbone  (20)
    • Foreign Film
  • Lagaan  (15)
    • Costume Design
  • The Mummy Returns  (10)
    • Makeup

Analysis:  Six fewer films than the year before.  The Tech winners, as a whole, actually hit the maximum number of points for the first time, though that will be equalled in each of the next two years thanks to the amazing work on Lord of the Rings.  The winner, among all categories, are also the highest to-date.  Among the biggest categories (the big 8 as well as the five major Tech categories), they are the highest of all-time with only Supporting Actress not earning the highest score possible.  The 2nd place finishers among all categories are the highest of all-time with a record 13 categories having a 2nd place film that earns my highest rating (three more than any other year).  It’s also the lowest difference between the average winner and the average 2nd place finisher.  The Tech Top 5’s are a new high, as a whole, though they will be soundly beaten by 2002.  All of the nominees as a whole are also a new high but again will be beaten by 2002 (though, through at least 2016, only 2002 and 2005 are higher).

Best Film Not Nominated for Any Nighthawk Awards:

  • Last Resort

Analysis:  My #23 film, a high ***.5 film that was nominated for Best British Film at the BAFTAs but doesn’t end up any higher than 16th in any category.

***.5 Films That Earn No Top 10 Finishes:

  • Last Resort
  • The Anniversary Party
  • Liam
  • The Tailor of Panama

Biggest Awards Film Not Nominated for Any Nighthawk Awards:

  • Iris

Analysis:  Iris is a good film with four really good performances.  Unfortunately, they come in 6th (Actress, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress) and 7th (Supporting Actor).  It’s just a really tough year in all the acting categories.  Iris has the 6th highest total awards points to-date for a film with no Nighthawk nominations.

Nighthawk Golden Globes:

Drama:

  • Best Picture
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  2. Mulholland Drive
  3. Memento
  4. In the Bedroom
  5. Vanilla Sky

Analysis:  Kudos to the Globes who nominated Mulholland Drive.
The rest of the **** films, in order, are: Amores Perros, The Man Who Wasn’t There, The Others, Monster’s Ball, A.I., The Princess and the Warrior, Black Hawk Down, The Devil’s Backbone and Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, followed by the ***.5 films: Sexy Beast, Faithless, Last Resort, The Widow of St. Pierre, Last Orders, The Anniversary Party, The Pledge, Liam, The Tailor of Panama, Under the Sand, The Road Home, No Man’s Land, Baran and The Deep End.

  • Best Director
  1. Peter Jackson  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)
  2. David Lynch  (Mulholland Drive)
  3. Christopher Nolan  (Memento)
  4. Ridley Scott  (Black Hawk Down)
  5. Joel Coen  (The Man Who Wasn’t There)

Analysis:  After a year in which four of the five directors were earning their only Drama noms, only one of these is even earning his first nom and that’s Christopher Nolan, who will earn several more in the future.  Peter Jackson earns his second nom (and the first of three straight wins), David Lynch earns his third, Ridley Scott his third and Joel Coen his third.

  • Best Adapted Screenplay:
  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
  2. In the Bedroom
  3. Vanilla Sky
  4. Last Orders
  5. A.I. Artificial Intelligence

Analysis:  Cameron Crowe earns his only Drama writing nom.  Peter Jackson earns his second nom and his first win.

  • Best Original Screenplay:
  1. Memento
  2. Monster’s Ball
  3. Amores Perros
  4. The Others
  5. The Man Who Wasn’t There

Analysis:  Christopher Nolan earns his second Drama writing nom and his first win.  The Coens earn their third Drama nom and it’s the first time they don’t win.

  • Best Actor:
  1. Tom Wilkinson  (In the Bedroom)
  2. Billy Bob Thornton  (The Man Who Wasn’t There)
  3. Guy Pearce  (Memento)
  4. Billy Bob Thornton  (Monster’s Ball)
  5. Tom Cruise  (Vanilla Sky)

Analysis:  This is the only Drama nom for Guy Pearce.  It’s the first nom for Tom Wilkinson, the second and third for Billy Bob Thornton and the fourth for Tom Cruise.  The Globes went with Crowe, Denzel, Will Smith and Kevin Spacey (The Shipping News).

  • Best Actress
  1. Sissy Spacek  (In the Bedroom)
  2. Naomi Watts  (Mulholland Drive)
  3. Nicole Kidman  (The Others)
  4. Halle Berry  (Monster’s Ball)
  5. Judi Dench  (Iris)

Analysis:  Halle Berry earns her only Drama nom.  Nicole Kidman and Naomi Watts earn their first noms, Judi Dench her third and Sissy Spacek her seventh (and last to-date).  The fifth Globe nominee was Tilda Swinton who is my #7.

  • Best Supporting Actor:
  1. Ian McKellen  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)
  2. Ben Kingsley  (Sexy Beast)
  3. Jude Law  (A.I. Artificial Intelligence)
  4. Ian Holm  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)
  5. Hugh Bonneville  (Iris)

Analysis:  This is the only Drama nom for Hugh Bonneville.  It’s the first nom for Jude Law, the third for Ben Kingsley, the fourth for Ian McKellen and the sixth for Ian Holm.
Take a very deep breath and remember that the Globes didn’t nominate Ian McKellen but did nominate Hayden Christensen for Life as a House.

  • Best Supporting Actress:
  1. Marisa Tomei  (In the Bedroom)
  2. Cameron Diaz  (Vanilla Sky)
  3. Cate Blanchett  (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)
  4. Kate Winslet  (Iris)
  5. Jennifer Connelly  (A Beautiful Mind)

Analysis:  Cameron Diaz and Jennifer Connelly earn their only Drama noms.  Marisa Tomei earns her first nom, Cate Blanchett her third and Kate Winslet her fifth.  This is the only time in which Cate Blanchett and Kate Winslet both earn nominations in the same category in the same year.
The other two Globe nominees are the top two in my Comedy awards, so the Globes did well here.

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring  (390)
    • Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress
  • In the Bedroom  (290)
    • Picture, Adapted Screenplay, Actor, Actress, Supporting Actress
  • Memento  (210)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor
  • Vanilla Sky  (155)
    • Picture, Adapted Screenplay, Actor, Supporting Actress
  • Mulholland Drive  (130)
    • Picture, Director, Actress
  • The Man Who Wasn’t There  (120)
    • Director, Original Screenplay, Actor
  • Monster’s Ball  (110)
    • Original Screenplay, Actor, Actress
  • Iris  (95)
    • Actress, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress
  • The Others  (75)
    • Original Screenplay, Actress
  • A.I. Artificial Intelligence  (70)
    • Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actor
  • Black Hawk Down  (45)
    • Director
  • Last Orders  (40)
    • Adapted Screenplay
  • Amores Perros  (40)
    • Original Screenplay
  • Sexy Beast  (30)
    • Supporting Actor
  • A Beautiful Mind  (30)
    • Supporting Actress

Analysis:  There are 3 fewer films than the year before.  There was a 25 year gap, from 1969 to 1994, where there wasn’t a year in which the four main Drama winners (Picture, Director, writing) earned my highest rating but this is the fourth time in eight years.  It hasn’t happened since.

Best Drama Not Nominated for Any Nighthawk Golden Globes:

  • The Princess and the Warrior

Analysis:  My #16 film of the year and the #11 Drama but its top finish is in 6th place for Actress and Original Screenplay.

Comedy / Musical:

  • Best Picture
  1. The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain
  2. Moulin Rouge
  3. Gosford Park
  4. The Royal Tenenbaums
  5. Ghost World

Analysis:  Amélie was nominated for Best Foreign Film.  See below for how the Globes botched this year.
The Top 5 averages a 94.6, tied with 1964 for the highest average of all-time.  Ghost World is the best #5 in the history of this category while Moulin Rouge ties Fargo for the best #2 in this category.  Gosford Park is the best #3 in this category since 1987.
The only other **** film is Monsters Inc but there are a few ***.5 films: Shrek, Ocean’s Eleven and Divided We Fall.  In Drama, the Top 5 films average a 95 and the second 5 average a 91.6.  In Comedy, the Top 5 films average a 94.6 and the second 5 average an 81.8.

  • Best Director
  1. Jean-Pierre Jeunet  (The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain)
  2. Baz Luhrmann  (Moulin Rouge)
  3. Robert Altman  (Gosford Park)
  4. Wes Anderson  (The Royal Tenenbaums)
  5. Steven Soderbergh  (Ocean’s Eleven)

Analysis:  Wes Anderson earns his first nom, the only first time nominee.  Baz Luhrmann earns his second nom, Steven Soderbergh earns his second nom, Jean-Pierre Jeunet earns his third nom and Robert Altman earns his fifth nom.  This moves Robert Altman up to 315 points and a tie for 6th place.
Jeunet is the best winner in this category in five years.

  • Best Adapted Screenplay:
  1. Ghost World
  2. Shrek
  3. Ocean’s Eleven
  4. Bridget Jones’s Diary

Analysis:  I list 14 films as eligible for this.  All four of these films make my Top 41 for the year.  No other eligible film made my Top 100, though Hedwig and the Angry Inch (at #103) is much better than any of the other eligible films (it’s the only remaining *** film and no other film ranks above #142).

  • Best Original Screenplay:
  1. The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain
  2. Gosford Park
  3. The Royal Tenenbaums
  4. Monsters Inc.
  5. Moulin Rouge

Analysis:  Wes Anderson earns his second Comedy writing nom.

  • Best Actor:
  1. Gene Hackman  (The Royal Tenenbaums)
  2. Ewan McGregor  (Moulin Rouge)
  3. George Clooney  (Ocean’s Eleven)
  4. John Cameron Mitchell  (Hedwig and the Angry Inch)
  5. Billy Bob Thornton  (Bandits)

Analysis:  This is the only Comedy nom for John Cameron Mitchell.  It’s the second nom for Billy Bob Thornton, the second for Gene Hackman (and his first in 23 years) and the second for Ewan McGregor.  It’s the final of four straight noms for George Clooney.
In spite of the great films in the Picture category, this is the weakest Top 5 in six years.  Hackman wins it easily, though he is the weakest winner since 1995.
The fifth Globe nominee was Hugh Jackman for Kate and Leopold.

  • Best Actress
  1. Audrey Tautou  (The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain)
  2. Nicole Kidman  (Moulin Rouge)
  3. Thora Birch  (Ghost World)
  4. Renee Zellweger  (Bridget Jones’s Diary)
  5. Kelly MacDonald  (Gosford Park)

Analysis:  Thora Birch earns her only Comedy nom.  Audrey Tautou earns her only Comedy nom (and win).  Nicole Kidman earns her first nom, Kelly MacDonald earns her second and Renee Zellweger her third (and second of four straight).
Remember – the Globes didn’t nominate Audrey Tautou but did nominate Reese Witherspoon for Legally Blonde.
This Top 5 is the opposite of Actor; it’s tied for the third best to-date.

  • Best Supporting Actor:
  1. Steve Buscemi  (Ghost World)
  2. Jim Broadbent  (Moulin Rouge)
  3. Clive Owen  (Gosford Park)
  4. Hugh Grant  (Bridget Jones’s Diary)
  5. Bill Murray  (The Royal Tenenbaums)

Analysis:  This is the only Comedy nom for Clive Owen and Steve Buscemi.  It’s the second nom for Jim Broadbent, the third for Hugh Grant and the sixth for Bill Murray, who moves up to 260 Comedy points, passing Fred Astaire.

  • Best Supporting Actress:
  1. Helen Mirren  (Gosford Park)
  2. Maggie Smith  (Gosford Park)
  3. Eileen Atkins  (Gosford Park)
  4. Gwyneth Paltrow  (The Royal Tenenbaums)
  5. Illeana Douglas  (Ghost World)

Analysis:  Eileen Atkins earns her only Comedy nom.  Helen Mirren earns her first Comedy nom.  Illeana Douglas earns her second nom, Gwyneth Paltrow earns her third and Maggie Smith her fourth.
This is the second best Top 5 to-date in this category though it will be thoroughly beaten by 2002.

  • The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain  (340)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actress
  • Gosford Park  (320)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actress, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress, Supporting Actress, Supporting Actress
  • The Royal Tenenbaums  (265)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress
  • Ghost World  (255)
    • Picture, Adapted Screenplay, Actress, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress
  • Moulin Rouge  (235)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor, Actress, Supporting Actor
  • Ocean’s Eleven  (120)
    • Director, Adapted Screenplay, Actor
  • Bridget Jones’s Baby  (105)
    • Adapted Screenplay, Actress, Supporting Actor
  • Shrek  (40)
    • Adapted Screenplay
  • Monsters Inc.  (40)
    • Original Screenplay
  • Hedwig and the Angry Inch  (35)
    • Actor
  • Bandits  (35)
    • Actress

Analysis:  Normally when there are only eleven films that’s because there are categories that aren’t filled.  But with two films over 300 points and five over 200 points, it’s because of the dominance of the great Comedy films in this year.

Best Comedy Not Nominated for any Nighthawk Golden Globes:

  • Divided We Fall

Analysis:  My #33 film of the year and the #9 Comedy, this is a Czech Comedy that was nominated for Best Foreign Film at the Oscars in 2000.

Roundup for the Year in Film:

Eligible Films I Have Seen:  230

By Stars:

  • ****:  20
  • ***.5:  17
  • ***:  97
  • **.5:  44
  • **:  35
  • *.5:  5
  • *:  8
  • .5:  3
  • 0:  1
  • Average Film Score for the Year, out of 100:  61.56

Analysis:  The score goes up by almost two full points.  That’s because the percentage of films below **.5 is almost exactly the same as the year before, the **.5 films and *** films stay basically the same while having more films while the ***.5 films go up and the **** films go way up.  There are 15 more films this year and there are 13 more films above ***.

My Year at the Theater

Introduction:  I’m still listing all the films I saw in the theater.  They are in release date order.

  • Memento  –  I don’t precisely remember when they opened the Fox Tower in downtown Portland, within walking distance from work for both Veronica and I but I think this might have been the first film we saw there.  I had heard about it for a while before it opened and was blown away.  It instantly made me a Christopher Nolan fan.
  • Shrek  –  Three years after Elizabeth, I finally returned to the Century Eastgate for opening day of Shrek.  It became the go-to theater for V and I.
  • The Anniversary Party  –  I think I saw this only with Tavis.  I know Tavis wanted to see it because he had a huge thing for Jennifer Jason Leigh, with whom he shares a birthday.  Very good, under-appreciated film.
  • Lara Croft: Tomb Raider  –  Veronica wanted to see this and so we did.  I had never played the game and I don’t like Angelina Jolie so I didn’t have much interest.  Thought it was dumb.
  • Monty Python and the Holy Grail  –  This was reissued that same weekend and I know we saw this at the Baghdad, the McMenamins theater and pretty much everyone in the theater knew every word of the film.
  • A.I.: Artificial Intelligence  –  We might have waited until the Saturday of opening weekend to see this since that would have been Veronica’s birthday.  I seem to recall seeing it with Tavis and Sariah.  Veronica sobbed hysterically because of Teddy.  I believe we saw this at Eastgate.
  • America’s Sweethearts  –  It had been three weeks since Veronica and I had seen anything and this film had a strong cast.  We couldn’t know how much it would suck.
  • Ghost World  –  Opened the same weekend but I think we saw this second.  We saw it at the Fox Tower and loved it.  I had no idea I had just introduced myself to the woman who would be the sex bombshell of the next 15 years.
  • Planet of the Apes  –  I’m not that attached to the original and this was directed by Tim Burton, so I was good with seeing it.  People objected to the ending but, you know, it’s only word for word the ending of the original novel.  Not all that good.
  • The Others  –  Good lord did this movie mess with me.  I don’t deal well with psychological horror.  It was brilliant and Kidman deserved an Oscar nomination but at one point I actually walked out of the theater.  I saw this with John and Veronica, I think at the Fox Tower.
  • Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back  –  Veronica and I went to see this in the Fox Tower and I remember her commenting when people left before the end credits because we knew that there would be an appearance from “God” closing the book on the View Askewniverse.  Still very enjoyable in some parts but very uneven.  Great soundtrack, which I own.
  • The Curse of the Jade Scorpion  –  I can’t remember if I talked Veronica into seeing this or just went with Tavis since V doesn’t like Woody Allen.  One of his weaker films.
  • Zoolander  –  It had been a month since we had seen anything.  That has to be it, because I don’t like Ben Stiller or Owen Wilson or Will Ferrell and this film never looked funny to me.  It wasn’t particularly funny.
  • Serendipity  –  We thought, well John Cusack’s summer romantic comedy sucked, but this one can’t, right?  Well, it didn’t suck, but it was far from good.
  • Mulholland Drive  –  Opening night at Cinema 21 with Veronica and John, John saying “No, it has to make sense.  It has to.”  Us insisting that it didn’t have to and that it didn’t but that it was brilliant either way.  Ranked #1 on my Sexiest Performances of All-Time.
  • Monsters Inc  –  Veronica and I saw this on opening day at Eastgate and loved it.  September and October had been fairly barren, but this was the start of one hell of a November and December with three films in my Top 26 Favorite Films.
  • The Man Who Wasn’t There  –  Brilliant Coen Brothers noir.  And, oh yeah, that best friend from Ghost World is now sexy jailbait.  Shades of things to come.  Saw this opening weekend at the Fox Tower with Veronica and possibly either Tavis or John (or both).
  • The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain  –  Probably saw this opening weekend at the Fox Tower.  I know I saw it with Veronica and John and that we loved it instantly.  It immediately became one of my favorite films of all-time (and still is, obviously).
  • Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone  –  As I detailed here, Veronica and I first started bonding over the Harry Potter books (which she read first).  This film would set the stage for the later, better films (once they got better directors).  Reviewed in full here.  Definitely saw this opening day at Eastgate and I think Veronica might have dressed for it.
  • In the Bedroom  –  Saw this later in the run, I think actually at Eastgate.  It shook me badly.  It was like watching my parents fight.
  • Ocean’s Eleven  –  Veronica and I saw this, I believe on opening weekend at Eastgate.  Julia Roberts and George Clooney?  Of course I saw it opening weekend.
  • Vanilla Sky  –  Veronica and I went to see this at a sneak preview with Tavis and Jill at Eastgate.  I remember that very distinctly.  I absolutely loved it and on the way home we drove by Movie Madness on Belmont so that I could rent the original Abre Los Ojos.
  • The Royal Tenenbaums  –  Another sneak preview, again V and I with Tavis and Jill.  I even remember Tavis and I driving over to Trilogy Video (in its original location) on our lunch break at Powells to get the passes.  Loved it.  Still absolutely love it.  #26 on my list of Top 100 Favorite Films.
  • Iris  –  I had read one of Iris Murdoch’s novels but knew nothing about her.  I was interested namely because of the strong cast.  Good film, great performances.
  • The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring  –  V and I saw this on opening day at Eastgate, of course.  I saw it several more times as well and I know V went with me at least once after they added the Two Towers preview to the end of the film.  I also saw it again two years later when Lloyd Cinemas showed the first two extended editions on the two weekends leading up to the release of Return of the King.  I remember running into my co-worker from Powells, Andrew Collins that day and discussing how they had just announced that Saddam Hussein had been found.
  • A Beautiful Mind  –  V and I saw this kind of late in the run at Eastgate, before the Oscars but definitely after it had been out for a few weeks.  I felt manipulated once the film ended, as can be seen from review of it.
  • The Shipping News  –  I think V and I saw this at the Fox Tower.  I had read the book and loved it.  I liked the film.
  • Gosford Park  –  V and I had interesting parallel reactions to this to my parents’ reactions.  My mother and I had heard about the film and both knew it was a murder mystery and waited most of the film for the actual murder and that colored our reactions (it would take me quite a while to really warm up to it).  V and my father didn’t know that it was a murder mystery and they were just able to relax and enjoy the film they were seeing.  We saw it, I think the second day at the Fox Tower because we went on opening night and it was sold out.  Or maybe we just had to hang around Portland and go to a later showing that first night.  Veronica watched the film and said “That’s the actress you have a big thing for?  Really?”  She doesn’t get my Kelly MacDonald thing.
  • Monster’s Ball  –  This already had a lot of awards attention before it opened in Portland, having already won the NBR for both Actor and Actress and earning the Globe nom for Halle Berry.  The sex scene had also been much discussed.  I saw it and thought it was great.  I was worried the ending would blow it, but I love the way the film ends.

Endnote:  That’s an increase of only one film.

Oscar-Nominated Films I Have Not Seen:

  • none

Oscar Quality:

Best Picture:  Luckily for this year, the winning film does not make a difference.  This year ranks at #5 all-time, which makes it one of three years in the top 6 (joining 1994 and 2005) in which the winner doesn’t rank among the top 350 nominees (A Beautiful Mind comes in at #382).  But there are two films in the Top 100 (Fellowship, Moulin Rouge) and the other two both make the Top 200.  That makes it one of only six years in the 5 BP Era to have four Top 200 films.  It is most similar to 1994, though, with the exception of Fellowship, all of the nominees are just slightly weaker than the 1994 films, which is why that year is #3 and this year is #5.  But they are very similar (1994 – #26, 51, 139, 156, 353; 2001 – #18, 69, 142, 175, 382).

The Winners:  While the nominees are magnificent (see below) the winners are not.  Lead by the four wins for A Beautiful Mind, all of which came in last place among the nominees, the overall rank among the nominees is 2.70, the lowest since 1985.  That includes five last place finishes (Actor is the other), the most since 1958.  Only five winners rank first among the nominees, the four for Fellowship, and, amazingly, the one for Pearl Harbor (even though it’s one of the worst films ever to win an Oscar, the win itself, in Sound Editing, is the better of the two nominees).  Those five are the fewest since 1987.  That makes this the first year since 1931 that the Academy gave the Oscar as often to the worst of the nominees as they did to the best of the nominees.  Among all films, the average winner ranks at 9.90, the worst since 1995.  There are four categories where the winner doesn’t even rank among my Top 20 (Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Actor), although in all of the remaining categories the winner is in my Top 8.  Still, only seven times does the Oscar go to my #1 or #2 choice, the lowest total since 1995.  The Tech categories actually do well (2.33 average, the best since 1993) but the acting, thanks to the Denzel win, averages 13.25, the worst in history and only the second time (after 1998) that they average in double digits.

The Nominees:  They are fantastic.  The acting, for once, is the weak spot, its total score of 76.8 slightly higher than 2000 but the second lowest since 1985.  But that’s more than countered by the major categories (84.6, the highest since 1982 and second highest to-date) and the Tech categories (88.1, by several points the highest to-date and a score that won’t be beaten until 2012).  Overall, the total Oscar Score is 83.8, the highest to-date, although 2002 will solidly beat that.  Up above, I mention the Oscar Score in several individual categories because of how good they are.

Golden Globe Best Picture – Comedy / Musical:  This year almost joins those strange years of 1982, 1992, 1994 and 2008, those years when four of the nominees made my list of Top 150 nominees and the fifth didn’t even make the Top 300.  It doesn’t join them because Bridget Jones’ Diary isn’t quite in the Top 150 (#156) and Legally Blonde just squeaks into the Top 300 (#297), though it won’t anymore after 2016 is factored in.  Having four films in the Top 160 is good enough to get this year into 15th place (out of 66) but it’s still pathetic.  Those two films should never have made the lineup, not when Ghost World and The Royal Tenenbaums didn’t make the list (though they both earned acting noms and Tenenbaums won Best Actor).  If you put those two films in, even having to leave out Amélie as a Foreign Film, this year would go all the way up to #2 all-time and the best to-date.  But they didn’t and it isn’t.

Top 5 Films of the Year:

1  –  The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring  (reviewed here and here)

2  –  The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain  (reviewed here)

3  –  Moulin Rouge  (reviewed here)

4  –  Mulholland Drive  (reviewed here)

Go deeper into the story as you go further back in time.

Go deeper into the story as you go further back in time.

5  –  Memento  (dir. Christopher Nolan)

Lenny has a problem.  He can’t make new memories.  He may have you told you about this before.  But he doesn’t remember that.  No one seems to believe it until it’s clear that he really doesn’t remember them.  Everything to him is brand new.  Except for the last memory.  “What’s the last thing you remember,” the woman working in the bar asks him.  “My wife,” he says.  “That’s sweet.”  “Dying.”

That’s what this film does.  It takes things that are happening and then it turns them on their side.  Or it turns them on their head.  If that were the entire concept, if this was just a gimmick with brilliant editing (and it does have brilliant editing – it absolutely should have won the Oscar), then the film would be good but wouldn’t be a classic.  But it is a classic and that’s because of how the storytelling works with the concept of the film.  In an average film, the plot moves forward and we learn about the plot as the characters learn about the plot.  But in this film, we move backwards and we still learn about the story even as Lenny is forgetting about the story.  It’s only at the end when everything has come together and yet, we’re also at the beginning.  Everything that came before is informed by what we learn at the end, and yet, that is also the ending, because it provides that climactic moment that gives us something to leave the theater on.

This film had debuted on the festival circuit and then played in Europe in late 2000.  It earned a U.S. release in March and I saw it sometime soon after that because the reviews were so amazing.  And I was sucked in by moments like Lenny running near a guy and thinking “So I’m chasing this guy,” until the guy pulls a gun and starts shooting at Lenny and he realizes, “No, he’s chasing me.”  Or the way that the bartender, Natalie, explains how she was beat up and the drama of it, only then we see the scene that actually preceded it and we realize what she has done and the brilliance of it.  The film sucked me in because it was brilliant.  I had never heard of Christopher Nolan before the film was made, wouldn’t see his debut film, Following, until a couple of years later.  But it was clear, in the writing, in the direction, that we were seeing the arrival of an amazing new talent, one destined for greatness (and maybe with Dunkirk, the Directors branch of the Academy will finally acknowledge his greatness).

But the triumph of the film isn’t entirely due to Nolan, though his script and direction are a major reason why.  The editing holds the film together in such a critical way that it definitely earned its Oscar nomination and should have won.  Guy Pearce plays a convincing hero, one of the very few times in his career he would get such a role.  And this film was made in that stretch when Carrie-Anne Moss was one of the sexiest and most vibrant actresses at work on film and if she’s not doing much film work today, well you should still see her amazing acting in Jessica Jones and you can see where the manipulative side of her originated.

Memento really is the work of a truly gifted auteur, a man who was just warming up for an amazing career.

The Razzies:  I can not complain about the Razzies this year.  They absolutely got the “winner” right, with Freddy Got Fingered and their four other nominees (in order of descending level of crappiness: Driven, 3000 Miles to Graceland, Glitter, Pearl Harbor) are all * films.  They probably should nominated Monkeybone given how bad it was and how big a box-office bomb it was but when they get the nominees this right then it’s just minor quibbling.

5 Worst Films  (#1 being the worst):

  1. Freddy Got Fingered
  2. Not Another Teen Movie
  3. Monkeybone
  4. Josie and the Pussycats
  5. Driven

note:  All five of these films were made by major studios which is an oddity.  Freddy Got Fingered earns zero stars, the next three earn .5 and Driven is a * film.  In fact, every film that earned less than *.5 in this year is from a major studio (three Fox films, two Disney, one Paramount, one Sony, three Universal, two Warners).
The list of Presumably Crappy Films That I Would Confirm are Crappy But I Haven’t Seen Them and Don’t Intend to See Them are: American Outlaws (though, good god I saw the commercial for it about 2000 times because it aired several times a night during The Simpsons which, back then, I watched four times every weeknight), The Animal, Bubble Boy, Corky Romano, Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles, Dr. Dolittle 2, Exit Wounds, Joe Dirt, Original Sin, Saving Silverman, Say It Isn’t So, Scary Movie 2, See Spot Run, Tomcats, Town & Country.

freddy_got_fingered_ver1

Go away.  You’re not funny.

Freddy Got Fingered  (dir. Tom Green)

“This movie doesn’t scrape the bottom of the barrel.  This movie isn’t the bottom of the barrel.  This movie isn’t below the bottom of the barrel.  This movie doesn’t deserve to be mentioned in the same sentence with barrels.”  That’s Roger Ebert writing.  It reminds me of Ebert’s famous anecdote about being in the elevator with Mel Brooks when a woman told him that The Producers was vulgar and Brooks replied, “Lady, it rose below vulgarity.”  There was an element of tastelessness in The Producers that run through it and Brooks knew exactly how to apply it.  Tom Green didn’t have that sensibility.  He didn’t seem to have any sensibilities.

There have been popular comedians who have been successful enough to get films made since the beginning of film.  I suspect that there always will be, because it provides a broader audience for those comedians and they crave that.  But that also means there will be those people who reach that point and suddenly the wider audience realizes, okay, this person isn’t funny (I was about to write “guy”, but Trainwreck reminded me that female comedians have reached that point as well and the gender equality is a good thing even if the comedy is still questionable).  When I was in high school, there was Andrew Dice Clay and even though he was a misogynist and he wasn’t funny, he managed to get a shitty movie made that thankfully died and helped crash his career.  Fast forward a decade and there’s Tom Green, a man that some people found funny (including at least one person I knew but that person had the most questionable taste of anyone I have ever met and I know a man who’s a misogynistic and vaguely racist homophobe who is now a judge).  Green had parlayed his stand-up into a show on MTV and then a film.  This film.  One of the worst films ever made.  I only finally consented to watch it because I felt like to truly write about the worst films of the year I would have to watch the Razzie nominees and this film won five Razzies and richly deserved every one of them.

Should I explain the plot to you?  What would be the point?  The point of the film was for Green to do his various gross-out routines.  It’s sometimes described as surrealistic but as a big fan of Salvador Dali I find that far too much of a stretch.  Just because you do something that is weird and dumb and makes no sense does not in and of itself make it surrealistic.  It just makes you a crass, tasteless idiot.  There are things in this film that are almost as tasteless as the things that I later have to deal with in films like Human Centipede except in this film the expectation is that people will actually laugh at them.  Even the title is stupid and tasteless and not a single bit funny.

I’ll be honest.  I don’t really like giving zero stars to films.  I feel that it’s a rating that should be reserved for films that show a complete absence of talent (think Ed Wood films) or films that reach the lowest level of what could be morally acceptable (Caligula).  This film somehow really manages to do both and for that it definitely earns its zero star rating.

Points:

  • Most Nighthawk Nominations:  The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring  (17)
  • Most Nighthawk Awards:  The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring  (13)
  • Most Nighthawk Points:  The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring  (755)
  • Worst Film Nominated for a Nighthawk Award:  The Mummy Returns
  • 2nd Place Award:  The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain  (Picture, Actress)
  • 6th Place Award:  Iris  (Actress, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress)
  • Most Nighthawk Drama Nominations:  The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring  (6)
  • Most Nighthawk Drama Awards:  The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring  (4)
  • Most Nighthawk Drama Points:  The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring  (390)
  • Worst Film Nominated for a Nighthawk Drama Award:  A Beautiful Mind
  • Most Nighthawk Comedy Nominations:   Gosford Park  (8)
  • Most Nighthawk Comedy Awards:  The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain  (4)
  • Most Nighthawk Comedy Points:  The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain  (340)
  • Worst Film Nominated for a Nighthawk Comedy Award:  Bandits

Note:  * means a Nighthawk record up to this point; ** ties a Nighthawk record.
Note:  Fellowship is tied for 3rd most nominations to-date, tied for 4th most wins to-date and tied for 7th most points to-date but will end up as only the 3rd highest of the decade for wins and points.
Note:  The Mummy Returns is the #170 film of the year.  No other nominee ranks below #64 and the only other films below #26 are Lagaan, A Beautiful Mind and Planet of the Apes.
Note:  Moulin Rouge has four 2nd place finishes but all four of those only add up to 65 points, as opposed to the 85 for the two 2nd place finishes for Amélie.
Note:  Iris is the first film to finish in 6th place in three acting categories.

Progressive Leaders:

  • Most Nighthawk Nominations:  The Wizard of Oz  /  The Godfather  (18)
  • Most Nighthawk Awards:  The Wizard of Oz  /  Bonnie and Clyde  /  Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon  (14)
  • Most Nighthawk Points:  Bonnie and Clyde  (865)
  • Most Nighthawk Awards without winning Best Picture:  Frankenstein  /  The Magnificent Ambersons  /  Tom Jones  (6)
  • Most Nighthawk Nominations without a Best Picture Nomination:  Yojimbo  (11)
  • Most Nighthawk Nominations without a Nighthawk Award:  Throne of Blood (13)
  • Actor:  Jack Nicholson  (500)
  • Actress:  Katharine Hepburn  (560)
  • Director:   Akira Kurosawa  (765)
  • Writer:  Ingmar Bergman  (1040)
  • Cinematographer:  Sven Nykvist  (375)
  • Composer:  John Williams  (825)
  • Foreign Film:  Akira Kurosawa  (600)

Breakdown by Genre  (Foreign in parenthesis, best film in genre following, avg. score is afterwards, in parenthesis):

  • Drama:  96 (40)  –  In the Bedroom  (66.9)
  • Foreign:  75  –  The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain  (67.2)
  • Comedy:  49 (14)  –  The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain  (57.0)
  • Crime:  21 (4)  –  Sexy Beast  (55.0)
  • Horror:  13 (3)  –  The Others  (59.8)
  • Kids:  12 (3)  –  Monsters Inc.  (58.1)
  • Fantasy:  9 (4)  –  The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring  (62.8)
  • Musical:  7 (1)  –  Moulin Rouge  (56.1)
  • Mystery:  5 (1)  –  Mulholland Drive  (70)
  • Suspense:  5 (2)  –  The Tailor of Panama  (67.6)
  • Action:  4 (1)  –  Iron Monkey  (35.5)
  • Sci-Fi:  3  –  A.I. Artificial Intelligence  (68.3)
  • War:  3 (1)  –  Black Hawk Down  (59.3)
  • Adventure:  3 (1)  –  Himalaya  (45.7)
  • Western:  0

Analysis:  For the second year in a row, the #1 Drama doesn’t make the Top 5, a rarity.  But only 41.74% of the films are Drama, the lowest in six years.  Also, less than 2/3 of the films are non-genre (Drama / Comedy / Musical) for the first time in six years.  But 32.6% of the films are Foreign films, the highest in seven years and third highest since 1984.  The 49 Comedies are the most in five years and tied for the second most ever (not just to-date).  The 21 Crime films are the highest ever.  The 9 Fantasy films are the most to-date as are the 75 Foreign films.  The 7 Musicals are the most since 1990 and the start of a big increase (partially in thanks to the success of Moulin Rouge).  The 5 Mysteries are the most since 1978.  Surprisingly, this is the first time that back-to-back years have no Westerns (there also won’t be any in 2002).  The Action average is the lowest since 1986, the Adventure is the lowest since 1995, Crime the lowest since 1989 and Musicals the lowest since 1990.  The Horror average, on the other hand, is the highest post-1968.
For the first time since 1981 and only the second time ever, there are multiple Fantasy films in the Top 10 (I list Vanilla Sky as Fantasy).  For the first time since 1946 and only the second time ever, there are multiple Mystery films in the Top 10 (in fact, multiple in the Top 5).  For the only time from 1998 to 2006 there is no Action film in the Top 20.  For the first time ever there are 3 Fantasy films in the Top 20.  For the first time since 1990 there are multiple Horror films in the Top 20.  For the first time since 1974 there are multiple Mystery films in the Top 20.  Fellowship becomes the first Fantasy film in 14 years to win the Nighthawk, but, obviously, is just the first of three straight, the first time since 1953-55 that any genre wins three straight Nighthawks.

Studio Note:  Miramax bounces back with 20 films, again the highest from any studio, followed by Warners with 18.  Lionsgate hits double digits for the first time with 13 films, the same amount as Fox, Paramount and Sony Pictures Classics.  The majors go slightly back up, accounting for 36.52% of the films, something they haven’t done since, with the 18 films from Warners being the most I’ve seen from any major since 1993.
Of the majors, only United Artists (with only 4 films) manages an average above 58 and Universal is all the way down with a ** average (49.42).  That’s contrasted against the prodigious quality output of Miramax (67.6), Sony Pictures Classics (69.8) and Lionsgate (68.6).
In spite of all that, it’s New Line, of course, that wins the Nighthawk, as it will each of the next two years.  No major has more than one Top 10 film and only Warners and Disney have more than one Top 20 films (two each).  Miramax scores two Top 10 films (Amelie, In the Bedroom) and USA Films has two in the Top 11 (Gosford Park, The Man Who Wasn’t There).

98 Films Eligible for Best Foreign Film (alphabetical, with director and country in parenthesis – red are ****, blue are ***.5 – both those colors qualify for my Best Foreign Film Award; an asterisk means it was the Official selection for the Oscar, two asterisks were nominated, three asterisks won the Oscar):

  • 12 Hours  (Marchand-Sanchez, Puerto Rico)  *
  • Abandoned  (Sopstis, Hungary)  *
  • Alias Betty  (Miller, France)
  • All About Lily Chou-Chou  (Iwai, Japan)
  • The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain  (Jeunet, France)  **
  • Avalon  (Oshii, Japan)
  • Baran  (Majidi, Iran)  *
  • Behind the Sun  (Salles, Brazil)  *
  • Beijing Bicycle  (Wang, China)
  • Big Man, Little Love  (Ipekci, Turkey)  *
  • Bolivia  (Caetano, Argentina)
  • Bread and Milk  (Cvitkovic, Slovenia)  *
  • Brotherhood of the Wolf  (Gans, France)
  • A Cab for 3  (Lubbert, Chile)  *
  • Chaos  (Serreau, France)
  • The Chimp  (Abdykalykov, Kyrgyzstan)  *
  • La Cienaga  (Martel, Argentina)
  • The Closet  (Veber, France)
  • Cowboy Bebop: The Movie  (Watanabe, Japan)
  • Dark Blue World  (Sverak, Czech Republic)  *
  • The Day I Became a Woman  (Meshkini, Iran)
  • Les Destinees  (Assayas, France)
  • The Devil’s Backbone  (del Toro, Mexico)
  • Dil Chahta Hai  (Akhtar, India)
  • Dog Days  (Seidl, Austria)
  • Elling  (Naess, Norway)  **
  • The Experiment  (Hirschbiegel, Germany)  *
  • The Fast Funner  (Kunuk, Canada)  *
  • Fate as a Rat  (Pavlov, Bulgaria)  *
  • Fulltime Killer  (To / Ka-Fai, Hong Kong)  *
  • Go  (Yukisada, Japan)  *
  • God is Great and I’m Not  (Bailly, France)
  • Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack  (Kaneko, Japan)
  • Gregoire Moulin Against the World  (de Penguern, France)
  • The Hapiness of the Katakuris  (Miike, Japan)
  • Happy Times  (Yimou, China)
  • How I Killed My Father  (Fontaine, France)
  • Ichi the Killer  (Miike, Japan)
  • In Praise of Love  (Godard, Switzerland)  *
  • Inch’Allah Dimanche  (Benguigui, Algeria)  *
  • Intacto  (Fresnadillo, Spain)
  • Italian for Beginners  (Scherfig, Denmark)  *
  • Japon  (Reygadas, Mexico)
  • Kandahar  (Makhmalbaf, Iran)
  • The Lady & the Duke  (Rohmer, France)
  • Lagaan  (Gowariker, India)  **
  • Lan Yu  (Kwan, Hong Kong)
  • The Last Kiss  (Muccino, Italy)
  • Late Marriage  (Kosashvili, Israel)  *
  • Legend of Rita  (Schlondorff, Germany)
  • La Libertad  (Alonso, Argentina)
  • Maangamizi: The Ancient One  (Mhando / Mulvihill, Tanzania)  *
  • Mad Love  (Aranda, Spain)  *
  • Maids  (Meirelles, Brazil)
  • Metropolis  (Rintaro, Japan)
  • Millennium Actress  (Kon, Japan)
  • Millennium Mambo  (Hou, Taiwan)
  • Monsoon Wedding  (Nair, India)
  • The Moonhunter  (Rittakol, Thailand)  *
  • Murderous Maids  (Denis, France)
  • My Life as McDull  (Toe, Hong Kong)
  • My Wife as an Actress  (Attal, France)
  • No Man’s Land  (Tanovic, Bosnia)  ***
  • Our Lady of the Assassins  (Schroeder, Colombia)  *
  • Pauline & Paulette  (Debrauwer, Belgium)  *
  • The Piano Teacher  (Haneke, Austria)  *
  • Pokemon 3 The Movie  (Yuyama, Japan)
  • Pulse  (Kurosawa, Japan)
  • Queen of the Night  (Schmidt, Croatia)  *
  • Quitting  (Zhang, China)
  • Quo Vadis  (Kawalerowicz, Poland)  *
  • Read My Lips  (Audiard, France)
  • The River  (Lampela, Finland)  *
  • The Romanovs: An Imperial Family  (Panfilov, Russia)  *
  • Safe Conduct  (Tavernier, France)
  • Sakura Wars: The Movie  (Hongo, Japan)
  • The Seagull’s Laughter  (Gudmundsson, Iceland)  *
  • Secret Ballot  (Payami, Iran)
  • Sex and Lucia  (Medem, Spain)
  • Shaolin Soccer  (Chow, Hong Kong)
  • Slogans  (Xhuvani, Albania)  *
  • Son of the Bride  (Campanella, Argentina)  **
  • The Son’s Room  (Moretti, Italy)  *
  • Spirited Away  (Miyazaki, Japan)
  • Symphony of Silence  (Chaldranian, Armenia)  *
  • Take Care of My Cat  (Jeong, South Korea)
  • Time Out  (Cantet, France)
  • Tosca  (Jacquot, France)
  • Tricky Life  (Flores Silva, Uruguay)  *
  • Trouble Every Day  (Denis, France)
  • Va savoir  (Rivette, France)
  • Violent Perfume  (Sistach, Mexico)  *
  • Visitor Q  (Miike, Japan)
  • War Live  (Bajic, Serbia)  *
  • Warm Water Under the Red Bridge  (Imamura, Japan)
  • What Time is it There?  (Tsai, Taiwan)
  • Y tu mamá también  (Cuarón, Mexico)
  • Zu Warriors  (Tsui, Hong Kong)

Note:  After jumping from 64 to 80, this year the total jumps to 98, which, as of early 2017, is still the highest all-time.  Japan, with 15 films, would have the most from any country since 1960 and tied for the most in any single year if not for the 18 films from France, which is the most by any country in one year through at least 2016.  This is the only year (through 2016) where multiple countries have more than 11 films.  Iran and Argentina hit new highs (4).  I have multiple films from Brazil for the first time since 1988.  I have my first films from Albania, Armenia and Tanzania.  I have my first films from Bosnia and Slovenia in seven years and my first film from Uruguay in nine years.
There are 56 Dramas (a new high, though, percentage wise less than the year before), 18 Comedies (a new high) and 5 Fantasy films (tied for the high).

Foreign Films Submitted for Best Foreign Film at the Oscars That I Haven’t Seen:

  • Australia:  La Spagnola  (dir. Jacobs)
  • Estonia:  The Heart of the Bear  (dir. Iho)
  • Georgia:  The Migration of the Angel  (dir. Managadze)
  • Greece:  In Good Company  (dir. Zapatinas)
  • Netherlands:  Nynke  (dir.Verhoeff)
  • Philippines:  In the Bosom of the Enemy  (dir. Portes)
  • Portugal:  Camarate  (dir. Rocha)
  • Sweden:  Jalla! Jalla!  (dir. Fares)
  • Taiwan:  The Cabbie  (dir. Huaken / Yiwen)
  • United Kingdom:  Do Not Go Gentle  (dir. Williams)
  • Venezuela:  A House with a View of the Sea  (dir. Aruelo)

note:  At this point I am making a concerted effort to see as many submitted films as I can.  The full list can be found here.  This year I am a solid 40 for 51 (78%), the highest since 1991 and the start of a run of 10 years where it never drops below 70%.  It’s the start of a three year run of record highs (the submissions go up by five) and only one of the following seven years won’t be a new high.
Of the 11 countries I am missing, five were also missing in 2000 (Georgia, Greece, Netherlands, Philippines, Portugal).  The countries that are out after submitting in 2000 are China, Slovakia, South Korea (all three of which will be back in 2002), Nepal, Vietnam, Morocco and Ecuador.  The United Kingdom and Colombia are back after one year gaps while Bosnia, Kyrgyzstan, Puerto Rico, Uruguay, Slovenia, Australia, Albania and Estonia are back after larger gaps.  Armenia and Tanzania are the only countries submitting for the first time.
These are my first miss, (Australia), second (Georgia), second out of two submissions (Estonia), third (United Kingdom, Venezuela), seventh (Greece, Philippines), eighth (Portugal), 12th (Sweden), 13th (Taiwan) and 16th (Netherlands)

Films Eligible in This Year But Originally Released in a Different Year:

  • The Wide Blue Road  (1957)
  • Night Train  (1959)
  • Faraon  (1966)
  • Iron Monkey  (1993)
  • Amy  (1997)
  • Baise-moi  (1998)
  • Spriggan  (1998)
  • Himalaya  (1999)
  • Jin-Roh: The Wolf Brigade  (1999)
  • Journey to the Sun  (1999)
  • Under the Sun  (1999)
  • Yana’s Friend  (1999)
  • Aberdeen  (2000)
  • Amores Perros  (2000)
  • Better than Sex  (2000)
  • Brother  (2000)
  • Chopper  (2000)
  • The Circle  (2000)
  • The Crimson Rivers  (2000)
  • Divided We Fall  (2000)
  • Eureka  (2000)
  • Everybody’s Famous  (2000)
  • Everything Put Together  (2000)
  • Faat Kine  (2000)
  • Faithless  (2000)
  • Glamour  (2000)
  • The Golden Bowl  (2000)
  • In the Mood for Love  (2000)
  • Joint Security Area  (2000)
  • The King is Alive  (2000)
  • Last Resort  (2000)
  • Liam  (2000)
  • Little Senegal  (2000)
  • The Luzhin Defence  (2000)
  • Me You Them  (2000)
  • Memento  (2000)
  • The Million Dollar Hotel  (2000)
  • The Prince of Light: The Legend of Ramayana  (2000)
  • The Princess and the Warrior  (2000)
  • Rain  (2000)
  • The Road Home  (2000)
  • Sexy Beast  (2000)
  • Signs & Wonders  (2000)
  • Smell of Camphor, Fragrance of Jasmine  (2000)
  • Songcatcher  (2000)
  • The Taste of Others  (2000)
  • Time and Tide  (2000)
  • Together  (2000)
  • Under the Sand  (2000)
  • Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust  (2000)
  • The Vertical Ray of the Sun  (2000)
  • The Widow of St. Pierre  (2000)
  • With a Friend Like Harry  (2000)

Note:  These 53 films average a 67.3.  Only one film is below ** (The Million Dollar Hotel) while there are three **** films (Memento, Amores Perros, The Princess and the Warrior).  These films account for 10 Nighthawk nominations, though half of those are for Memento.

Films That Weren’t Eligible at the Oscars:

  • Amores Perros
  • Baise-moi
  • Better Than Sex
  • Blood: The Last Vampire
  • Chopper
  • Dancing at the Blue Iguana
  • Dinner Rush
  • Everybody’s Famous
  • Everything Put Together
  • Faithless
  • Glamour
  • Happy Accidents
  • Himalaya
  • Jin Roh: The Wolf Brigade
  • Journey to the Sun
  • Kill Me Later
  • The King is Alive
  • The Legend of Rita
  • Million Dollar Hotel
  • The Night Train
  • Our Song
  • Panic
  • Pharoah
  • The Price of Milk
  • The Road Home
  • Signs & Wonders
  • Smell of Camphor, Fragrance of Jasmine
  • Spriggan
  • The Taste of Others
  • Together
  • Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust
  • The Wide Blue Road
  • The Widow of St. Pierre
  • Yana’s Friends
  • The Young and the Dead

Note:  This is different from the list below.  Starting in 1994, I have full lists from Academy press releases of all the eligible films.  But there are a lot of films in each year that weren’t officially eligible for a variety of reasons but were released in what would normally be considered qualifying runs.  So, these are films that were listed on oscars.org (unlike the list below), but weren’t actually eligible for the Oscars.  I ignore that, of course, and these films are all eligible for the Nighthawks.  But having them on the list helps me know what year they were “eligible” even if they really weren’t.  Bear in mind that some of these films were eligible (and sometimes even nominated) for Best Foreign Film in their original release year.

Films Not Listed at Oscars.org:

  • 12 Hours
  • Abandoned
  • Aberdeen
  • Amy
  • Avalon
  • Big Man, Little Love
  • Born Romantic
  • Bread and Milk
  • A Cab for 3
  • The Chimp
  • Code Unknown
  • Dil Chahta Hai
  • Divided We Fall
  • Eureka
  • Faat Kine
  • Fate as a Rat
  • Go
  • Gregoire Moulin Against the World
  • How Harry Became a Tree
  • In the Mood for Love
  • Iron Monkey
  • Joint Security Area
  • The Legend of Zu
  • La Libertad
  • Lift
  • Little Senegal
  • Maagamizi: The Ancient One
  • Maids
  • The Moonhunter
  • My Life as McDull
  • The Prince of Light: The Legend of Ramayana
  • Queen of the Night
  • Rain
  • The River
  • The Romanovs: An Imperial Family
  • Slogans
  • Strictly Sinatra
  • Symphony of Silence
  • Things Behind the Sun
  • Under the Sun
  • Violet Perfume
  • War Live

Note:  I used to use the list at Oscars.org for deciding which year films are eligible in before it went apparently defunct.  Thankfully, I copied all the lists while it was still live.  Some films, however, didn’t appear in that database.  For those films, I use the IMDb.  These are the films that weren’t listed in the Oscars.org database but that end up in this year.
As is usually the case, most of these are Foreign films which never got an L.A. release.  The films marked in orange were those that were submitted for Best Foreign Film at the Oscars (not necessarily in this year).

Films Released This Year Originally But Eligible in a Different Year:

  • ‘R Xmas  (2002)
  • Alias Betty  (2002)
  • All About Lily Chou-Chou  (2002)
  • The Bank  (2002)
  • Bartleby  (2002)
  • Beijing Bicycle  (2002)
  • The Believer  (2002)
  • Birthday Girl  (2002)
  • Brotherhood of the Wolf  (2002)
  • CQ  (2002)
  • Les Destinees  (2002)
  • Elling  (2002)
  • Enigma  (2002)
  • The Experiment  (2002)
  • The Fast Runner  (2002)
  • The Happiness of the Katakuris  (2002)
  • Happy Times  (2002)
  • How I Killed My Father  (2002)
  • Human Nature  (2002)
  • In Praise of Love  (2002)
  • Intacto  (2002)
  • Italian for Beginners  (2002)
  • Kandahar  (2002)
  • The Lady & the Duke  (2002)
  • Lan Yu  (2002)
  • The Last Kiss  (2002)
  • Late Marriage  (2002)
  • Lucky Break  (2002)
  • Mad Love  (2002)
  • Me Without You  (2002)
  • Metropolis  (2002)
  • Monsoon Wedding  (2002)
  • Murderous Maids  (2002)
  • Mutant Aliens  (2002)
  • My Wife is an Actress  (2002)
  • Pauline & Paulette  (2002)
  • The Piano Teacher  (2002)
  • The Quiet American  (2002)
  • Quitting  (2002)
  • Quo Vadis  (2002)
  • Rabbit-Proof Fence  (2002)
  • Read My Lips  (2002)
  • Safe Conduct  (2002)
  • Scotland PA  (2002)
  • Secret Ballot  (2002)
  • Sex and Lucia  (2002)
  • Son of the Bride  (2002)
  • The Son’s Room  (2002)
  • Spirited Away  (2002)
  • Storytelling  (2002)
  • Take Care of My Cat  (2002)
  • Thirteen Conversations About One Thing  (2002)
  • Time Out  (2002)
  • Tosca  (2002)
  • Tricky Life  (2002)
  • Warm Water Under the Red Bridge  (2002)
  • What Time is it There?  (2002)
  • Y tu mamá también  (2002)
  • Bolivia  (2003)
  • Buffalo Soldiers  (2003)
  • Chaos  (2003)
  • Cowboy Bebop: The Movie  (2003)
  • Dust  (2003)
  • Fulltime Killer  (2003)
  • God is Great and I’m Not  (2003)
  • Hotel  (2003)
  • Ichi the Killer  (2003)
  • Inch’Allah Dimanche  (2003)
  • Japon  (2003)
  • Lawless Heart  (2003)
  • Millennium Actress  (2003)
  • Sakura Wars: The Movie  (2003)
  • Taking Sides  (2003)
  • Visitor Q  (2003)
  • Dog Days  (2004)
  • Godzilla, Mothra and King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack  (2004)
  • Millennium Mambo  (2004)
  • The Seagull’s Laughter  (2004)
  • Shaolin Soccer  (2004)
  • Prozac Nation  (2005)
  • Pulse  (2005)

Note:  These 81 films average a 63.3.  That’s because of a bunch of ** films, one *.5 film (‘R Xmas), two * films (Mutant Aliens, Hotel) and a .5 film (Visitor Q).  Those are counter-balanced by three **** films (Spirited Away, Y tu mamá también, The Quiet American) and a number of ***.5 films, most notably Rabbit-Proof Fence and Millennium Actress.

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