cbm50bfweaqz48gIntroduction

This is a companion piece to three different series.  The first is The History of the Academy Awards, in which I covered each category in individual posts.  This was originally done in 2009 and additions were included in 2010.  You can find links to all of these pieces in each individual category.  I have grouped all of the categories together for the same reason that I did so originally – because most pieces on the Oscars don’t approach the awards through the categories, but through the years.  This specific piece is designed to take a closer look at the decade and how I think the Academy did in those years.

The second series is my Year in Film series.  That is mentioned here because in those pieces I included paragraphs about the Oscars as a whole for each year and included a considerable amount of trivia.  Since I had based my Year in Film series and eligibility as such on the Academy calendar, it all seemed very relevant.  Also, I include various prizes (Worst Oscar, Worst Nomination, Worst Omission, etc) and I didn’t want to repeat myself, so following the links will bring you there.  Those links are at the end of this piece, where I do a brief summation of each year and how the Academy did.  One note on the Year in Film posts – I did those before Oscars.org started putting up official information about release dates.  Several films have been moved from the years where they appeared in those posts – see the Nighthawk Awards posts for more accurate placement – I have included links in the years.

The third series is my History of the Academy Awards: Best Picture series, where I reviewed every film ever nominated for Best Picture (except The Patriot, which is lost).  Those links are also down below, grouped by year.

Keys to all the Numbers / Ranks / Scores, etc:  There are a lot of numbers and lists down below.  The lists are often easy to understand, the numbers not so much.

  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  That takes the winner (say, Actor in 1995) and says where I would rank it for the year (#1 in this case).  Then I average it out, either for category (the first part) or by year (the bottom part).  The closer to 1, the better.
  • Average Winner Rank (without Picture):  Because I rank all films for the year but don’t rank every film in every category, the Best Picture category can really throw things off, especially since every film is eligible in this category.  So, in a year like 1995, where Best Picture (Braveheart) is my #140 film of the year but no other winner ranks below #37, the average winner rank goes from 8.11 to 14.70.  So, down below, in the years, I include a score both with and without Best Picture.
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  Quite simply what it says.  Braveheart may have ranked 140th on the year, but only 5th among the Best Picture nominees.  The key is this – the first Average Winner rank tells you what I think of the winner.  This one tells you what I think in relation to what they nominated.  Like, in Best Art Direction (color), where from 1946 to 1949 my Winner Ranks are 6, 1, 1 and 5.  But all four of them were the best choice among the nominees, so the score was 1, 1, 1, 1.  A high disproportion between the two scores means I think they botched the nominees, but that will show up in the Score.  Again, the closer to 1, the better.
  • Score:  This is a score of their nominees versus mine.  It’s complicated and bizarre and has to do with assigning a numeric value to a function of art.  But it measures a year against itself.  1978 is a good example – not a single one of my Best Picture nominees from 1978 would have made my list for 1977.  But if the Academy and I agreed 5 for 5, it would still score 100.  It’s a comparison between what the Oscars nominated and what I think they should have nominated, not a comparison to any other year.  Suffice it to say, the closer to 100 the better.  By the way, the Score determines the Best and Worst Year in everything except Picture, which is ranked based on my original ranked list.
  • Score  (P-D-S):  The score, averaged among Picture, Director and Screenplay.
  • Score  (Acting):  The score, averaged among the four acting categories.
  • Score  (Tech):  The score, averaged among Editing, Cinematography, Score, Sound, Art Direction, Visual Effects and Costume Design (and in later decades Sound Editing and Makeup).

Stats and Trivia for the Decade:

  • Most Nominations:
  1. Titanic  (14)
  2. Forrest Gump  (13)
  3. Shakespeare in Love  (13)
  4. Dances with Wolves  (12)
  5. Schindler’s List  (12)
  6. The English Patient  (12)

note: All six of these films won Best Picture.  Saving Private Ryan was next with 11 noms and it lost.  Titanic tied the all-time record.

  • Most Oscars:
  1. Titanic  (11)
  2. The English Patient  (9)
  3. Dances with Wolves  (7)
  4. Schindler’s List  (7)
  5. Shakespeare in Love  (7)

note:  All Best Picture winners.  Of the 13 films in the decade that won four or more Oscars, 10 of them won Best Picture.  Two of them weren’t nominated (Terminator 2, The Matrix, which both won 4).  Then there was Saving Private Ryan, which won 5.  Titanic tied the all-time record.

  • titanic-quad-poster-style-cMost Points:
  1. Titanic  (625)
  2. The English Patient  (620)
  3. Dances with Wolves (590)
  4. Shakespeare in Love  (585)
  5. Forrest Gump  (580)
  6. Schindler’s List  (570)
  7. American Beauty  (475)
  8. The Silence of the Lambs (455)
  9. Saving Private Ryan  (450)
  10. Unforgiven  (440)

note: The top six films are all higher than any film from the 70’s or 80’s.  Titanic had the most points since 1959.  The only Best Picture winner not on the list is Braveheart, which, with 425 points, came in 11th.

  • Number of Films Nominated for a Feature Film Oscar:  364
  • Number of Films Nominated for Multiple Oscars:  174
  • Number of Films to win a Feature Film Oscar:  97
  • Number of Films to win multiple Oscars:  38
  • Most Nominations without Best Picture:  Dick Tracy  /  Bullets over Broadway  (7)
  • Most Oscars without winning Best Picture:  Saving Private Ryan  (5)  *
  • Most Oscars without a Best Picture nomination:  Terminator 2  /  The Matrix  (4)
  • Most Points without a Best Picture nomination:  Thelma & Louise  (245)
  • Most Nominations with No Wins:  The Remains of the Day  (8)
  • Films Nominated for All 4 Acting Categories:  none  **
  • Films Nominated for All 5 Major Tech Categories:  Dances with Wolves  /  Schindler’s List  /  Forrest Gump  /  The English Patient  /  Titanic  /  L.A. Confidential  /  Shakespeare in Love  /  Saving Private Ryan
  • Films to Win All 5 Major Tech Categories:  The English Patient  /  Titanic

*  –  the second decade in a row this has been a Spielberg film
**  –  the only films to even get nominated in three categories were As Good as It Gets (missing Supporting Actress) and Shakespeare in Love (missing Actor)

  • Director with Most Films Nominated for Best Picture:
  1. Steven Spielberg  /  James Ivory  /  Frank Darabont  (2)
  • Director with Most Films Nominated for an Oscar:
  1. Steven Spielberg  /  Woody Allen  (6)
  2. Martin Scorsese  /  Barry Levinson  (5)

note:  That is the exact same list as for the 1980’s except putting Scorsese in the spot held last decade by Richard Donner.

  • jurassicparkspielberg500Director with Most Total Nominations for their Films:
  1. Steven Spielberg  (36)
  2. James Cameron  (21)
  3. Barry Levinson  (19)
  4. Martin Scorsese  (18)
  5. James Ivory  (18)
  • Director with Most Oscars for their Films:
  1. Steven Spielberg  /  James Cameron  (15)
  2. Anthony Minghella  (9)
  3. Kevin Costner  /  Jonathan Demme  /  Robert Zemeckis  /  John Madden  (7)

note:  Minghella, Costner, Zemeckis and Madden do all their wins with just one film.

  • Director with Most Points for their Films:
  1. Steven Spielberg  (1330)
  2. James Cameron  (835)
  3. Anthony Minghella  (750)
  4. James Ivory  (680)
  5. Robert Zemeckis  (640)
  • Studio with Most Best Picture Nominees:
  1. Miramax  (9)
  2. Paramount  /  Warner Bros  /  Columbia  (6)
  3. Universal  (5)
  4. Disney  (4)
  • Studio with Most Best Picture Wins:
  1. Orion  /  Paramount  /  Miramax  (2)

note on Studios:  Things change drastically in this decade.  MGM and UA both fail to earn a nomination at all.  Disney, after earning only two nominations prior to 1990, earns four this decade.  Orion wins Best Picture twice in a row to start the decade, then collapses into bankruptcy.  October and Fine Line earns their only nominations and Gramercy earns its only three (none of these exist anymore).  Sony Pictures Classics earns its first nomination.  DreamWorks begins its war with Miramax, losing in 1998 but winning in 1999 (and then also in 2000 and 2001).  The remaining majors do decently, with all five of them earning at least three nominations and only Columbia failing to win the Oscar.  Columbia is interesting because it is nominated the first six years of the decade and probably would have won in 1995 had not the directors passed over Ang Lee, but after that, won’t earn another nomination until 2010.  But all of the majors are lorded over by Miramax, which earns an astounding nine nominations and wins in both 1996 and 1998.  Starting in 1992, Miramax will have a streak of nominations that will last through 2004, the longest consecutive streak of Best Picture nominations since MGM had one from 1929 to 1946.

Best Picture

In the first six full decades of the Oscars at least half of the Best Picture winners weren’t the best or worst choice.  In this decade, six times the Oscars made the best choice among the nominees (the actual best film in 1991, 1992, 1993 and 1999 with the best of the nominees in 1996 and 1998) while three times they made the worst choice (1994, 1995, 1997).  That leaves only one year where they made a choice that wasn’t the best or worst choice (Dances with Wolves).   That leaves an average of 2.3 among the nominees, tying the 60’s for the best decade of all-time.  However, the average winner among all films is worse than three previous decades.  In fact, Braveheart alone makes it worse than those three decades.  While it’s not the worst winner (it’s the fourth worst), because I have seen so many more films for 1995 than I had for 1929, 1931 or 1952, it is the lowest ranked among its year.  It’s one of only four winners all-time to not make the Top 100 in its respective year and at #140, it’s the only one outside the Top 110.  In addition, you have Forrest Gump (the #38 film of 1994) and Titanic (the #41 film of 1997).  The overall rank among all films would have been really bad if not for the fact that this is the first decade where I agree with four winners (Silence of the Lambs, Unforgiven, Schindler’s List, American Beauty), not to mention two #2 films (GoodFellas, Shakespeare in Love) and a #3 (The English Patient).

They also have problems with the nominees.  The Oscar Score, which had already dropped six points from the 70’s to the 80’s, drops another two points here.  Only one year (1994) scores higher than a 75 and no year scores higher than an 80.  But the average is still better than the first few decades, as only one year (1995) has a score lower than 50 and no year has a score lower than 45.

The notion that Oscar winners come out late in the year is broken this decade.  In the 80’s, every winner was released after Labor Day.  In this decade, we get a February release (Silence of the Lambs), a May release (Braveheart), a July release (Forrest Gump) and an August release (Unforgiven).  Yet, we still have typical Christmas releases from Schindler’s List, Titanic and Shakespeare in Love.  Only 70% of the Picture nominees would be released after Labor Day and in 1995, there would only be one, while 1994 is the only year since 1979 to not have a single December release be nominated (or November release, for that matter).

Braveheart becomes only the second Best Picture winner since 1958 to fail to earn any acting nominations and is the first in eight years not to earn a Best Actor nomination.  It is the only winner of the decade not to earn a lead acting nomination.  Titanic is the first winner since 1965 not to earn a writing nomination.  Silence of the Lambs is the only winner in the decade not to earn a Cinematography nomination.  American Beauty is the only winner not nominated for Best Sound but only three win.  Titanic is the first winner since 1976 to be nominated for Song and the first since 1958 to win for Song.  Unforgiven is the only winner between 1983 and 2004 to win Supporting Actor.  The English Patient is the first winner since 1979 to win Supporting Actress.  Nine Picture winners win Director but only six win for writing.  Between 1994 and 1999 no film wins Picture, Director and Screenplay, the longest gap since 1934-39.  Forrest Gump is the first Picture winner since 1959 to win Visual Effects and is the first since 1967 to earn a nomination for Sound Editing.  Braveheart is the first Picture winner to ever win Sound Editing.  After a nine year gap where no Picture winner wins Costume Design, three in a row do, from 1996-98.  Beauty and the Beast is the first Picture nominee since 1975 to not earn a Director, writing or acting nomination.

The big actors among Best Picture nominees are Tom Hanks (star of the winner in 1994 and star of nominees in 1995, 1998 and 1999), Ralph Fiennes (earning nominations for the wins he is in, in 1993 and 1996 and also starring in a 1994 nominee) and, surprisingly, Tom Wilkinson, who has minor roles in In the Name of the Father and Sense and Sensibility while having more prominent roles in The Full Monty and Shakespeare in Love.  Anthony Hopkins is also big, with roles in a winner, followed by two straight nominees, from 1991-93.  And, of course, Colin Firth is cuckolded by a Fiennes in the 1996 and 1998 winners.  Jack Nicholson would also appear in two more nominees, running his career total up to nine.  Robert De Niro would be in two nominees in 1990 (his sixth and seventh) and then not in another one until 2012.

I have already said so much on this category in my other posts (see at the bottom, listed under each year).

  • Best Year:  1994
  • Worst Year:  1995
  • Best Winner:  Schindler’s List
  • Worst Winner:  Braveheart
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  GoodFellas
  • Worst Nominee:  Scent of a Woman
  • Most Egregious Snub:  The Age of Innocence
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  23.9
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  3.2
  • Score for the Decade:  64.6

schindlerslist-2Winners (ranked):

  1. Schindler’s List
  2. The Silence of the Lambs
  3. American Beauty
  4. The English Patient
  5. Unforgiven
  6. Dances with Wolves
  7. Shakespeare in Love
  8. Forrest Gump
  9. Titanic
  10. Braveheart

gf10 Best Nominees That Didn’t Win:

  1. GoodFellas
  2. L.A. Confidential
  3. Pulp Fiction
  4. Fargo
  5. The Shawshank Redemption
  6. The Crying Game
  7. Sense and Sensibility
  8. JFK
  9. Beauty and the Beast
  10. Four Weddings and a Funeral

scent10 Worst Nominees (#1 being the Worst)

  1. Scent of a Woman
  2. Braveheart
  3. The Green Mile
  4. Shine
  5. Ghost
  6. The Prince of Tides
  7. Titanic
  8. Forrest Gump
  9. Babe
  10. Life is Beautiful

note:  28 of the nominees in this decade are **** and another 14 are ***.5 (including Life is Beautiful and Babe).  There are hugh gaps after Ghost.  Ghost is #368 (as of late 2016, prior to the 2016 Oscar noms), while the last four, respectively, are #414, 443, 497 and 523 (out of 530).

Original Cinema Quad Poster - Movie Film Posters

Ten Biggest Snubs:

  1. The Age of Innocence
  2. Ed Wood
  3. Lone Star
  4. Trainspotting
  5. Boogie Nights
  6. Hamlet
  7. The Usual Suspects
  8. The Sweet Hereafter
  9. The Ice Storm
  10. Magnolia

Ten Studios with the Most Points (through 1999):

  1. Warner Bros  –  3400
  2. 20th Century-Fox  –  3350
  3. MGM  –  3250
  4. United Artists  –  3200
  5. Columbia  –  3100
  6. Paramount  –  3100
  7. Universal  –  1400
  8. RKO  –  1000
  9. Miramax  –  600
  10. Orion  –  500

note:  Thanks to the decline of MGM and UA, Warner Bros takes over 1st place in 1993 and Fox takes over 2nd place in 1997.  Miramax goes from one nomination ever to 9th place within the decade.

Best Director

spielbergEvery winner in the decade except Kevin Costner was either the best choice (6 times) or the worst choice (1994, 1995, 1997).  Because so many were the best choice, the average winner among the nominees actually goes down slightly.  However, because three of them don’t make the Top 15 of the year (as many as 1959-1989 combined), the average winner rank overall is the worst since the 50’s.

There are three years where the Oscar Score dips below 70.  In 1999, where they nominated Lasse Hallstrom but passed over directors like Neil Jordan, Stanley Kubrick and P.T. Anderson is 64.1.  In 1996, where they nominated Scott Hicks rather than Danny Boyle or John Sayles, the score is even worse (60.5).  But it’s 1995, where it collapses, with the nominations of Mel Gibson and Chris Noonan rather than Ang Lee earns a score of 34.3, the worst since 1956.  But there is also 1991, where the score is 90.0, the highest since 1973 and the third highest to-date.  Overall, the Oscar Score is a slight drop from the decade before and it’s almost 10 points higher than Best Picture, with 1995 and 1996 the only years it isn’t higher than Picture.  Most notable is 1990, where Picture nominations went to Awakenings and Ghost but Director nominations went to The Grifters and Reversal of Fortune, for a 26.8 point difference, the second highest since 1968.

There would again be some real oddities during the decade.  Only three directors would earn multiple nominations: Steven Spielberg, who, after all his snubs and losses, would win twice, James Ivory, and Robert Altman.  Altman is the oddity, in that he is nominated in back-to-back years without a Best Picture nomination either time, the first time this happened since John Huston in 1950-51.  Rob Reiner, in 1992, becomes the first director to ever earn three DGA nominations without a corresponding Oscar nomination.  In 1994, Woody Allen would earn a Best Director nomination, his fourth without a corresponding Best Picture nomination, joining Fellini as the only directors to do that.  In 1995, Ang Lee would become the first director to win the Consensus without earning an Oscar nomination and the directors would fundamentally alter the Oscar race by failing to nominate Lee or DGA winner Ron Howard (only the second DGA winner to fail to earn an Oscar nom).  Once again, three actors turned directors win Oscars (Kevin Costner, Clint Eastwood, Mel Gibson).  Only three directors have two films nominated for Best Picture.  Spielberg wins Director twice but Picture only once.  James Ivory loses both awards both times.  Frank Darabont loses Picture twice and isn’t nominated for Director either time.

There would also be some notable nominations during the decade.  John Singleton would become the first African-American nominated for Best Director as well as breaking Orson Welles’ record for being the youngest director ever nominated.  Two years later, Jane Campion would become just the second female ever nominated for Best Director.

  • Best Year:  1991
  • Worst Year:  1995
  • Best Winner:  Steven Spielberg  (Schindler’s List)
  • Worst Winner:  Mel Gibson  (Braveheart)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Martin Scorsese  (GoodFellas)
  • Worst Nominee:  Martin Brest  (Scent of a Woman)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Martin Scorsese  (The Age of Innocence)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  8.0
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.3
  • Score for the Decade:  72.5

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Martin Scorsese  (The Age of Innocence)
  2. Tim Burton  (Ed Wood)
  3. Danny Boyle  (Trainspotting)
  4. John Sayles  (Lone Star)
  5. Ang Lee  (Sense and Sensibility)

Top 4 in Points for the Decade:

  1. Steven Spielberg  –  180
  2. 10 directors  –  90

Top 10 in Points (through 1999):

  1. William Wyler  –  675
  2. Billy Wilder  –  450
  3. Frank Capra  –  405
  4. John Ford  –  405
  5. David Lean  –  405
  6. Fred Zinnemann  –  405
  7. George Stevens  –  315
  8. Elia Kazan  –  315
  9. Woody Allen  –  315
  10. Steven Spielberg  –  315

Best Writing:

Best Screenplay Based on Material From Another Medium

Even though the average nominees are much better in this decade than in the 1980’s, the actual Oscar Score goes down just slightly, from 78.3 to 78.0.  The best year is the phenomenal group of nominees in 1993 (Schindler’s List, The Age of Innocence, In the Name of the Father, Shadowlands, The Remains of the Day), the best group of five in history and one I completely agree with.  But, while only 1991 and 1999 fall below 70, 1990 is the only other year to surpass 83.8.

The winners are a mixed bunch.  Five of them are the right choice and one other is the second best.  But The Cider House Rules barely makes my Top 10, Forrest Gump doesn’t make my Top 10 and Sling Blade is just a terrible, terrible choice.

Three writers win an Oscar and earn one other nomination in the decade and they win their Oscars in a row: 1992 (Ruth Prawer Jhabvala), 1993 (Steven Zaillian) and 1994 (Eric Roth).  They are the only writers to earn more than 80 points in Adapted Screenplay.  A couple of writer-directors do win Oscars (Curtis Hanson, Bill Condon) and we get Oscars as well for Emma Thompson, Billy Bob Thornton and John Irving.  We also see the only two writing nominations for Martin Scorsese and multiple nominations for both Frank Darabont (both from Stephen King works) and Anthony Minghella.  Robert Benton earns his final nomination in 1994, pushing him into the Top 10.  In 1991 we get nominations from two writers adapting their novels: Pat Conroy and Fannie Flagg.  Arthur Miller earns a nomination in 1996 but loses to Thornton while in 1999 we get the first nomination for future Oscar winner Alexander Payne.

  • Best Year:  1993
  • Worst Year:  1999
  • Best Winner:  L.A. Confidential
  • Worst Winner:  Sling Blade
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  GoodFellas
  • Worst Nominee:  Sling Blade
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Ed Wood
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  8.8
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.4
  • Score for the Decade:  78.0

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Ed Wood
  2. The Ice Storm
  3. The End of the Affair
  4. Jackie Brown
  5. The Commitments

Best Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen

This category starts the decade with a tremendous thud, earning an 18.8 in 1990, the lowest score in the category’s history.  It recovers nicely, with three years over 90 (1994, 1997, 1999) and two others over 80 (1991, 1996).  The winners are also a strong group, with five of them being the best of the year and two others being the second best and only two real duds (Ghost, The Piano).

This decade is once again all about Woody Allen.  He began the decade in 2nd place all-time and even though he again has the most points of any writer in the decade (200 – five nominations) it still only just moves him up to a tie with Billy Wilder.  The decade’s end of 1998-99 is the first time he misses out on Oscar nominations in consecutive years since 1982-83, so it will take until 2005 before he finally passes Wilder.  Only two other writers will even earn multiple nominations during the decade: Mike Leigh (1996, 1999) and Paul Thomas Anderson (1997, 1999).

This decade will see the first Oscars for Quentin Tarantino and the Coen Brothers and the first nominations for future winners Peter Jackson, Fran Walsh, Cameron Crowe and Charlie Kauffman.  It will also see Oscars for prominent writer-directors Neil Jordan and Jane Campion and playwright Tom Stoppard, as well, of course, as the Oscars for Matt Damon and Ben Affleck.

  • Best Year:  1994
  • Worst Year:  1990
  • Best Winner:  Pulp Fiction
  • Worst Winner:  Ghost
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Lone Star
  • Worst Nominee:  Braveheart
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Clerks
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  4.5
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.9
  • Score for the Decade:  72.3

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Clerks
  2. The Big Lebowski
  3. A Perfect World
  4. In the Bleak Midwinter
  5. Three Kings

Top 5 for Points on the Decade:

  1. Woody Allen  –  200
  2. Steven Zaillian  –  120
  3. Ruth Prawer Jhabvala  –  120
  4. Eric Roth  –  120
  5. 29 tied with 80

Top 10 for Points through 1999:

  1. Billy Wilder  –  600
  2. Woody Allen  –  400
  3. Charles Brackett  –  400
  4. John Huston  –  360
  5. Ben Hecht  –  320
  6. Federico Fellini  –  320
  7. Francis Ford Coppola  –  320
  8. Joseph L. Mankiewicz  –  280
  9. Carl Foreman  –  280
  10. Paddy Chayefsky  –  280
  11. Robert Benton  –  280
  12. Oliver Stone  –  280

Best Actor

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Older actors were still finally getting their due – Anthony Hopkins, after never earning a nomination before, would earn four and would win an Oscar.  Al Pacino would finally break out of the losers club and win an Oscar.  Jack Nicholson would become the second male to win three Oscars but the other (Walter Brennan) won all his in supporting while two of Nicholson’s are in lead.  At the same time, Tom Hanks would emerge as the new Spencer Tracy, winning back-to-back Oscars and future constant nominee Sean Penn would earn his first two nominations.

Actor is a little bit weaker this decade.  While three years break 90 (1991, 1993, 1999) there are also three years that fail to break 80 (1990, 1994, 1996), with 1996 at 70.7 having the weakest score since 1957.  The winners are much weaker than the decade before though two falling outside the Top 20 (Al Pacino, Roberto Benigni) and three more outside the Top 5 (Tom Hanks both times, Geoffrey Rush).  Only three winners do I completely agree with (Anthony Hopkins, Nicolas Cage, Kevin Spacey).  With Pacino and Benigni, it’s the first decade since the 60’s where the Oscars make the worst choice in this category twice.

  • Best Year:  1993
  • Worst Year:  1996
  • Best Winner:  Anthony Hopkins  (The Silence of the Lambs)
  • Worst Winner:  Al Pacino  (Scent of a Woman)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Ian McKellen  (Gods and Monsters)
  • Worst Nominee:  Al Pacino  (Scent of a Woman)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Kenneth Branagh  (Hamlet)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  9.0
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.6
  • Score for the Decade:  84.6

hamletFive Biggest Snubs:

  1. Kenneth Branagh  (Hamlet)
  2. Johnny Depp  (Ed Wood)
  3. Ray Liotta  (GoodFellas)
  4. Ian Holm  (The Sweet Hereafter)
  5. Ralph Fiennes  (Quiz Show)

Top 5 Points of the Decade (Actor only):

  1. Tom Hanks  –  175
  2. Anthony Hopkins  –  140
  3. 12 tied with 70

Top 10 Points through 1999  (Actor only):

  1. Spencer Tracy  –  385
  2. Laurence Olivier  –  350
  3. Marlon Brando  –  315
  4. Paul Newman  –  315
  5. Jack Nicholson  –  315
  6. Dustin Hoffman  –  315
  7. Jack Lemmon  –  280
  8. Fredric March  –  245
  9. Gary Cooper  –  245
  10. Peter O’Toole  –  245

Best Actress

howards-end-emma-thompsonI think of this as the decade for Emma Thompson even though that wasn’t really the case.  That’s because she won three Nighthawks and earned multiple other nominations.  But at the Oscars, while she did win once, her other win was as a writer and one of her four nominations was in supporting.  It was really Susan Sarandon, who earned nominations in 1991, 1992 and 1994 before finally winning in 1995 that had the most points.  Although, of course, Meryl Streep continued to rack up nominations, earning four more (1990, 1995, 1998, 1999).

The scores, for the most part, stay strong.  Four of the first six years break 90 and the next three all break 85.  But the weakness of 1994 (68.6, the lowest since 1973 and second lowest since 1955) means the decade score actually drops a bit from the decade before.  Still, it is once again the strongest of the four acting categories for the decade.  Every nominee once again at least makes my list and only seven of them fail to make my Top 10 in their respective years.

The winners are a stronger bunch this decade.  While only three winners also win the Nighthawk (Jodie Foster, Emma Thompson, Frances McDormand), only Jessica Lange fails to earn a Nighthawk nomination.  And once again, they never pick the worst nominee, and only once did they pick the fourth best (1995).

  • Best Year:  1995
  • Worst Year:  1994
  • Best Winner:  Emma Thompson  (Howard’s End)
  • Worst Winner:  Jessica Lange  (Blue Sky)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Emma Thompson  (The Remains of the Day)
  • Worst Nominee:  Janet McTeer  (Tumbleweeds)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Cate Blanchett  (Oscar and Lucinda)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  3.4
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.2
  • Score for the Decade:  86.9

oscarFive Biggest Snubs:

  1. Cate Blanchett  (Oscar and Lucinda)
  2. Sigourney Weaver  (Death and the Maiden)
  3. Emma Thompson  (Much Ado About Nothing)
  4. Winona Ryder  (The Crucible)
  5. Cecilia Roth  (All About My Mother)
  6. Isabelle Adjani  (Queen Margot)

note:  There are six because Emma Thompson was nominated in 1993 and couldn’t be nominated twice, so it technically wasn’t a snub.

Top 4 Points for the Decade  (Actress only):

  1. Susan Sarandon  –  175
  2. Emma Thompson  –  140
  3. Meryl Streep  –  140
  4. Jodie Foster  –  105

note:  No other actress earned more than 70 points.  Of these four, only Streep didn’t win an Oscar, instead earning four nominations (1990, 1995, 1998, 1999).

Top 10 Points through 1999  (Actress only):

  1. Katharine Hepburn  –  560
  2. Bette Davis  –  420
  3. Meryl Streep  –  385
  4. Greer Garson  –  280
  5. Ingrid Bergman  –  280
  6. Jane Fonda  –  280
  7. Norma Shearer  –  245
  8. Elizabeth Taylor  –  245
  9. 10 tied  –  210

Best Supporting Actor

UNFORGIVEN, Gene Hackman, 1992

Only three actors in the decade would earn multiple nominations for Supporting Actor.  Tommy Lee Jones would lose his first time in 1991 but win in 1993.  Al Pacino would lose in both 1990 and 1992 but would win Actor in 1992.  Ed Harris would start his career as perennial “how does this actor not have an Oscar yet” contender with nominations in 1995 and 1998.  Jack Palance, Gene Hackman and Martin Landau would all win Oscars after twice before being nominated and losing (Palace in the 50’s, Hackman in the 60’s, Landau in the 80’s).  Michael Caine would win a second Oscar while Kevin Spacey would win before winning Actor a few years later.  Of the 47 actors nominated this decade, only six have been nominated in this category again since and none have won, as compared to Best Actor, where five of the Oscar winners in the following decade earned nominations this decade.

With an overall Oscar Score of 85.7 this decade is the best so far for Supporting Actor.  That’s because of the peak stretch from 1991 to 1993 where the scores are 94.7, 97.1 and 94.7.  Outside of those three years the score never drops below 75.0 but also never goes above 88.6.  The winners are a mixed bunch, with four of them winning the Nighthawk (Joe Pesci, Gene Hackman, Martin Landau, Kevin Spacey) but three of them failing to earn Nighthawk noms (Jack Palance, Cuba Gooding, James Coburn).  1994-95 is the last time I agree with the winners in back-to-back years until 2008-09.

  • Best Year:  1993
  • Worst Year:  1999
  • Best Winner:  Gene Hackman  (Unforgiven)
  • Worst Winner:  Jack Palance  (City Slickers)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Ralph Fiennes  (Schindler’s List)
  • Worst Nominee:  Michael Clarke Duncan  (The Green Mile)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Kevin Spacey  (L.A. Confidential)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  4.0
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.1
  • Score for the Decade:  85.7

lacon-jack3-mainFive Biggest Snubs:

  1. Kevin Spacey  (L.A. Confidential)
  2. Bill Murray  (Rushmore)
  3. Patrick Stewart  (Jeffrey)
  4. Donald Sutherland  (Without Limits)
  5. John Turturro  (Quiz Show)

Top Points of the Decade  (Supporting only):

  1. Tommy Lee Jones  –  90

note:  Jones is the only actor of the decade to earn more than 60 points.  Nine actors won the Oscar while Al Pacino and Ed Harris each received two nominations without a win.

Top 10 Points through 1999 (Supporting only):

  1. Walter Brennan  –  210
  2. Peter Ustinov  –  150
  3. Jason Robards  –  150
  4. Jack Nicholson  –  150
  5. Charles Coburn  –  120
  6. Claude Rains  –  120
  7. Anthony Quinn  –  120
  8. Arthur Kennedy  –  120
  9. Gig Young  –  120
  10. Melvyn Douglas  /  Jack Palance  /  Gene Hackman  /  Martin Landau  /  Michael Caine  –  120

Top 5 Points of the Decade (combined):

  1. Tom Hanks  –  175
  2. Anthony Hopkins  –  170
  3. Al Pacino  –  130
  4. Kevin Spacey  –  130
  5. Jack Nicholson  /  Geoffrey Rush  –  100

note:  Tom Hanks and Kevin Spacey each win two Oscars while the other four each win Best Actor once.

Top 10 Points through 1999  (combined):

  1. Jack Nicholson  –  465
  2. Spencer Tracy  –  385
  3. Laurence Olivier  –  380
  4. Marlon Brando  –  345
  5. Jack Lemmon  –  340
  6. Paul Newman  –  315
  7. Dustin Hoffman  –  315
  8. Al Pacino  –  300
  9. Robert De Niro  –  270
  10. Fredric March  /  Gary Cooper  /  Peter O’Toole  –  245

note:  While most of this list has multiple Oscars, Peter O’Toole doesn’t even have an Oscar.

Best Supporting Actress

wiestThe winners drop considerably from the decade before.  Only three of them are the best of the year (Ruehl, Wiest, Dench) while one other is the best of the nominees (Binoche).  But four of them don’t even make my nominees (Goldberg, Tomei, Basinger, Jolie) with Goldberg and Basinger not even making my Top 10 for the year.

The scores are strong for the decade, a slight improvement over the 80’s, but still just below the average for acting for the decade.  Four years are above 90 (1993, 1994, 1998, 1999) and only 1996 and 1997 fall below 80 and they don’t fall below 70.

Only two actresses earn more than one nomination (Diane Ladd, Joan Allen), both of them successive, but neither wins the Oscar, so no actress in the decade earns more than 60 points.

  • Best Year:  1999
  • Worst Year:  1997
  • Best Winner:  Diane Wiest  (Bullets over Broadway)  *
  • Worst Winner:  Kim Basinger  (L.A. Confidential)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Julianne Moore  (Boogie Nights)
  • Worst Nominee:  Gloria Stuart  (Titanic)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Kate Winslet  (Hamlet)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  5.3
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.9
  • Score for the Decade:  85.6

Note:  Wiest is the Best Winner two decades in a row, which is really impressive.

winsletSix Biggest Snubs:

  1. Kate Winslet  (Hamlet)
  2. Sigourney Weaver  (The Ice Storm)
  3. Natalie Portman  (Beautiful Girls)
  4. Miranda Richardson  (The Crying Game)
  5. Bonnie Bedelia  (Presumed Innocent)
  6. Cameron Diaz  (Being John Malkovich)

note:  I list six because Richardson was nominated in 1992 for Damage and technically couldn’t be nominated also for The Crying Game.

Top Points in the Decade  (Supporting only):

  1. 12 tied with 60

Top 10 Points through 1999  (Supporting only):

  1. Thelma Ritter  –  180
  2. Ethel Barrymore  –  150
  3. Shelley Winters  –  150
  4. Lee Grant  –  150
  5. Maureen Stapleton  –  150
  6. Diane Wiest  –  150
  7. Anne Revere  –  120
  8. Celeste Holm  –  120
  9. Claire Trevor  –  120
  10. Agnes Moorehead  /  Geraldine Page  /  Maggie Smith  –  120

note:  Ritter and Moorehead are the only actresses in the Top 12 without an Oscar, although Page’s Oscar is in lead.

Top 5 Points in the Decade  (combined):

  1. Susan Sarandon  –  175
  2. Emma Thompson  –  170
  3. Meryl Streep  –  140
  4. Jodie Foster  –  105
  5. Holly Hunter  /  Kathy Bates  –  100

Top 10 Points through 1999  (combined):

  1. Katharine Hepburn  –  560
  2. Meryl Streep  –  475
  3. Bette Davis  –  420
  4. Ingrid Bergman  –  340
  5. Jane Fonda  –  310
  6. Geraldine Page  –  295
  7. Greer Garson  –  280
  8. Jessica Lange  –  270
  9. Norma Shearer  –  245
  10. Elizabeth Taylor  –  245

note:  Page, Garson, Lange and Shearer are the only actresses in the Top 10 without multiple Oscars.

Best Editing

Editing is really an odd category by this time.  Of the five main Tech categories (the ones consistently around since the 1930’s), it is by far the one that does not have dominant people.  Granted, it has always had 5 nominees while Cinematography and Score for years had unlimited nominees and multiple categories.  Still, if you had 10 nominations without a win, you would be in the 10th place in Cinematography and you wouldn’t make the Top 10 list for Score, Sound or Art Direction.  That would make you the #1 all-time in Editing.  Six nominations without a win would put you in the Top 10 by 1999.

Michael Kahn will lead the decade again, with just two nominations because he wins both (Schindler’s List, Saving Private Ryan).  Walter Murch would tie him by winning an Oscar (The English Patient) and earning two other nominations (The Godfather Part III, Ghost).  Thelma Schoonmaker would earn just one nomination during the decade (GoodFellas).

The connection between Best Picture and Best Editing remains very strong.  This time a whopping six films win both awards, the most since the 50’s.  Once again, only one winner of Best Editing isn’t nominated for Picture (The Matrix).  There is an astounding 70% overlap (30 films with nominations in both categories including every Picture winner).  There is a slight uptick of films that are nominated for Best Editing but receive no other nominations (The Commitments, Hoop Dreams, Seven).  Of the 18 films with more than 7 nominations, all but three are nominated for Editing (Bugsy, Howards End, The Remains of the Day) and the only two films nominated for more than 5 Oscars without Picture or Editing are Dick Tracy and Bullets over Broadway.  In most years, four of the Best Picture nominees were also nominated for Editing and 1991 is the only year where it wasn’t at least three.

The Oscar Score goes way up (almost 10 points up) from the decade before to a new decade high.  In 1991, it breaks 80 for just the second time with a fantastic 92.3.  Only two years are below a 60, the terrible 1997 (35.0) and the truly dismal 1995 (14.3).  The winners are a mixed bunch in my opinion, with two Nighthawk winners (Unforgiven, Schindler’s List), two second place finishers (JFK, Saving Private Ryan) and two third place finishers (Dances with Wolves, The English Patient).  But, we also have a ninth place (Forrest Gump), 12th place (Apollo 13), 21st place (The Matrix) and 34th place (Titanic) which is why the Average Winner Rank goes up so much (from 6.2 to 8.8).

  • Best Year:  1991
  • Worst Year:  1995
  • Best Winner:  Saving Private Ryan
  • Worst Winner:  Titanic
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  L.A. Confidential
  • Worst Nominee:  Braveheart
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Lone Star
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  8.8
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.2
  • Score for the Decade:  62.4

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Lone Star
  2. The Usual Suspects
  3. Trainspotting
  4. Boogie Nights
  5. Reservoir Dogs

Top 3 in Points for the Decade:

  1. Michael Kahn  –  100
  2. Walter Murch  –  100
  3. 6 tied with  –  75

Top 9 in Points through 1999:

  1. William H. Reynolds  –  225
  2. Michael Kahn  –  225
  3. Barbara McLean  –  200
  4. Daniel Mandell  –  200
  5. William Lyon  –  200
  6. Ralph E. Winters  –  200
  7. Harold F. Kress  –  200
  8. Ralph Dawson  –  175
  9. Arthur Schmidt  –  175
  10. 4 tied with  –  125

Best Cinematography

This decade is kind of a handing off-point.  Conrad Hall had won an Oscar in 1969 and would die early in the next decade (and win an Oscar just after that).  He would win his second Oscar in this decade for American Beauty and earn nominations for Searching for Bobby Fischer and A Civil Action.  But also in the Top 5 are Robert Richardson (Oscar for JFK, nom for Snow Falling on Cedars), and who would also be in the Top 5 the next decade and Roger Deakins who would earn his first three nominations this decade (The Shawshank Redemption, Fargo, Kundun) and would be the top cinematographer of the next decade and possibly the top of the current one as well.

The actual top cinematographers of the decade would be Janusz Kaminski who would win two Oscars and earn a third nomination, all for Spielberg films and John Toll who would win two very undeserved Oscars (Legends of the Fall, Braveheart), earn a very deserved nomination (The Thin Red Line) and has never been nominated again since.

The nominees are mostly pretty good (no year is below 60) but not great (only 1997 breaks 90).  Still, the last half of the decade is much better with the last four years all over 84.  The winners are mostly pretty good except for the two Toll Oscars.  Those are the only two winners outside my Top 4 in a year and only two others are even outside my Top 2.  Even the two bad Oscar choices weren’t the worst nominees of the year, so this category continues the longest active streak of not awarding the worst nominee, going all the way back to 1934.

  • Best Year:  1997
  • Worst Year:  1995
  • Best Winner:  The English Patient
  • Worst Winner:  Braveheart
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  L.A. Confidential
  • Worst Nominee:  Batman Forever
  • Most Egregious Snub:  The Last of the Mohicans
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  5.8
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.9
  • Score for the Decade:  77.8


<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/28989315″>The Last Of The Mohicans – End Scene</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/user8430512″>Le Tahaa</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. The Last of the Mohicans
  2. GoodFellas
  3. The Silence of the Lambs
  4. Boogie Nights
  5. The Age of Innocence

Top 5 in Points for the Decade:

  1. Janusz Kaminski  –  125
  2. John Toll  –  125
  3. Conrad Hall  –  100
  4. Robert Richardson  –  75
  5. Philippe Rousselot  /  Roger Deakins  –  75

Top 10 in Points through 1999:

  1. Leon Shamroy  –  550
  2. Charles Lang  –  475
  3. Robert Surtees  –  475
  4. Harry Stradling  –  450
  5. Joseph Ruttenberg  –  350
  6. George Folsey  –  325
  7. James Wong Howe  –  300
  8. William V. Skall  –  275
  9. Conrad Hall  –  275
  10. Ray Rennahan  –  250
  11. Arthur Miller   –  250
  12. Victor Milner  –  250
  13. Joseph LaShelle  –  250

Best Original Score / Original Comedy Score

So they finally finished with the pain-in-the ass “adaptation” or “song score” category and then they decided, after Disney kept winning this category with animated films (four wins in six years from 1989 to 1994) that they would split it into two by genre, like it used to be back in the 1940’s.  That provided for a stretch of years with more Oscar nominated films than any since the black-and-white / color divide was done away with in 1967.  Among the films nominated for Comedy Score without any other nominations were Unstrung Heroes, The American President, The First Wives Club, The Preacher’s Wife, My Best Friend’s Wedding and Patch Adams.  Did any of those have scores you can remember?  It also meant that they decided that Life is Beautiful was not a Comedy.

While this decade is thought of as the Disney decade (wins in 1991, 1992 and 1994, Comedy win in 1995, plus Comedy nominations in 1995, 1996 (two) and 1998 (two)), it is still John Williams who ends up on top.  That’s partially because Disney had several different composers (Alan Menken, the top one, wins three Oscars and earns another nomination).  Williams manages a nomination in every year except 1992 and 1994 and manages nominations in both categories in 1995, so even though he only wins one Oscar (1993), he easily has the most points in the decade.  Williams begins a streak of eight straight years with a nomination in 1995, the longest streak in this category since 1949.  He’s the only composer after 1956 to have a streak of five straight years and this is his fourth such streak.  In 1993 he finally moves into 2nd place all-time in points where he still remains today.  Jerry Goldsmith also finally moves into the Top 10 this decade, earning his last three nominations.

The scores are down this decade, with only two years scoring over an 81 (1997, 1999) and neither breaking 88.  But the Oscar winners are mostly better, with three winners also winning the Nighthawk and three more coming in second place at the Nighthawks.  It does stumble a bit at the end though with three lesser winners to finish the decade.

Original Score

  • Best Year:  1997
  • Worst Year:  1990
  • Best Winner:  Schindler’s List
  • Worst Winner:  Life is Beautiful
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Amistad
  • Worst Nominee:  Havana
  • Most Egregious Snub:  The Last of the Mohicans
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  3.7
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.8
  • Score for the Decade:  72.2

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. The Last of the Mohicans  (Edelman)
  2. The Power of One  (Zimmer)
  3. Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace  (Williams)
  4. Much Ado About Nothing  (Doyle)
  5. Jurassic Park  (Williams)

Comedy Score

  • Best Year:  1997
  • Worst Year:  1996
  • Best Winner:  Shakespeare in Love
  • Worst Winner:  Pocahontas
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Toy Story
  • Worst Nominee:  Patch Adams
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Mars Attacks  *
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  1.5
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.25
  • Score for the Decade:  42.2

Note:  That’s assuming the Academy wouldn’t have considered Fargo a Comedy for this category.

Top 5 in Points for the Decade:

  1. John Williams  –  250
  2. Alan Menken  –  175
  3. Hans Zimmer  –  150
  4. Randy Newman  –  125
  5. Jamer Horner  –  100
  6. Thomas Newman  –  100

Top 10 in Points through 1999:

  1. Alfred Newman  –  1270
  2. John Williams  –  875
  3. Max Steiner  –  700
  4. Morris Stoloff  –  525
  5. Victor Young  –  500
  6. Miklos Rozsa  –  475
  7. Jerry Goldsmith  –  450
  8. Dimitri Tiomkin  –  435
  9. Ray Heindorf  –  430
  10. Franz Waxman  –  350
  11. Alex North  –  350

Best Sound Recording

For the third straight decade, the Score goes up in this category.  Six of the years have scores above 75 and the lowest is 58.1, though only two years are really great (a perfect 100 in 1991 and an excellent 97.1 in 1996).  The average winner among all films stays the same as the previous decade while the average winner among the nominees drops to 1.4.  There’s one really bad choice (Speed), but six times the Nighthawk winner also wins the Oscar and the Oscar winner is never worse than second among the nominees.

While Gary Rydstrom is the dominant sound engineer of the decade, winning four Oscars (T2, Jurassic Park, Titanic, Saving Private Ryan) and earning two other nominations, this decade also marks the rise of Kevin O’Connell.  O’Connell and Donald O. Mitchell become the first of the new generation of sound engineers, after the rules changes in the late 60’s, to make the Top 10 and that start to make the list look drastically different.  Mitchell will earn five nominations in the first six years of the decade, his final five Oscar nominations.  O’Connell will continue to amass nominations (eight in this decade) without a win, mostly for work that shouldn’t have been nominated (Days of Thunder, A Few Good Men, Con Air).

  • Best Year:  1990
  • Worst Year:  1995
  • Best Winner:  Saving Private Ryan
  • Worst Winner:  Speed
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  The Hunt for Red October
  • Worst Nominee:  Con Air
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Fight Club
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  2.9
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.4
  • Score for the Decade:  77.9

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Fight Club
  2. Heat
  3. Ronin
  4. GoodFellas
  5. The Fifth Element

Top 5 in Points in the Decade:

  1. Gary Rydstrom  –  200
  2. Gary Summers  –  180
  3. Kevin O’Connell  –  160
  4. Andy Nelson  –  160
  5. Tom Johnson  –  140

Top 10 in Points through 1999:

  1. Douglas Shearer  –  380
  2. John Livadary  –  360
  3. Nathan Levinson  –  340
  4. Gordon Sawyer  –  320
  5. Donald O. Mitchell  –  300
  6. Thomas T. Moulton  –  280
  7. Robert Knudson  –  260
  8. Les Fresholtz  –  260
  9. Kevin O’Connell  –  260
  10. L. L. Ryder  –  240

Note:  This list finally changes for the first time since the 1960’s.

Best Art Direction

tracy09Stuart Craig continues to be the only major art designer to earn nominations in this decade, though he only earns one win (The English Patient) and another nomination (Chaplin).  He is the only designer in the Top 60 in points by the end of the decade to earn another nomination after this decade.  Dante Ferretti is slowly moving up the list, earning four nominations (Hamlet, The Age of Innocence, Interview with the Vampire, Kundun) but he won’t win an Oscar until 2004.

The winners in this decade would be a bit of a mixed bunch.  Only two Oscar winners would win the Nighthawk (Dick Tracy, Shakespeare in Love).  But five of them would be my #2.  Because my winner was usually a nominated film, in all five cases I would also list those as the second best nominee.  In fact, only one winner in the decade finishes lower than 2nd among the nominees (Restoration) and it’s also the only winner not to at least earn a Nighthawk nomination (without it, the Average Winner Rank goes from 3.4 to 2.1).

The Oscar Score dips a little bit from the decade before, but it’s still the second best among the Tech categories.  That includes 1996, possibly the best group of five nominees the Academy has ever put forth in this category (Hamlet, The English Patient, Romeo + Juliet, The Birdcage, Evita).  Only three times does the score drop below 75 and only in 1994 (69.2) does it drop below 70.  However, 1996 is the only time that it gets above 90 (1992 earns exactly a 90).

  • Best Year:  1996
  • Worst Year:  1994
  • Best Winner:  Dick Tracy
  • Worst Winner:  Restoration
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  The Age of Innocence
  • Worst Nominee:  Legends of the Fall
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Sense and Sensibility
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  3.4
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.0
  • Score for the Decade:  83.2

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Sense and Sensibility
  2. Raise the Red Lantern
  3. Boogie Nights
  4. GoodFellas
  5. Farewell My Concubine

Top 4 in Points in the Decade:

  1. Ian Whittaker  –  80
  2. Dante Ferretti  –  80
  3. Nancy Haigh  –  80
  4. Luciana Arrighi  –  80

Top 10 in Points through 1999:

  1. Cedric Gibbons  –  1020
  2. Edwin B. Willis  –  800
  3. Lyle Wheeler  –  660
  4. Sam Comer  –  600
  5. Thomas Little  –  540
  6. Walter M. Scott  –  540
  7. Hans Dreier  –  520
  8. Richard Day  –  520
  9. Hal Pereira  –  480
  10. George Davis  –  380

Best Visual Effects

This category would finally be a fixed category after 1990, with Total Recall winning the special award that year.  After that, it would fairly consistently have three nominees (two in 1995).  Starting in 1995, we would also get lists of Finalists, giving an idea of which films the Academy was considering.  So we can see that Jumanji at least made the Finalists list that year, but so did Waterworld and Casper while 12 Monkeys and GoldenEye did not.  I don’t account for the Finalists lists when I give the Oscar Score.  Once I get to the next decade and there starts to be lists of “eligible” films, that will be taken into consideration.  It is interesting to know that one of my Top 5 Snubs however, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, didn’t even make the Finalists list in 1998.

Most of the winners in this decade would be solid choices.  Seven of them would be the best choice among the nominees and five of those would win the Nighthawk.  The only two winners not to land in my Top 2 are Death Becomes Her (#5 in a weak year) and What Dreams May Come (#10).  The nominees would be solid, with three years earning a perfect 100 (though 1990 only has a winner and 1995 only two nominees) and only one year (1998) earning below a 70 and even it earns a 64.7.

Dennis Muren would again be the biggest man of the decade, though with only two Oscars and two other nominations, it would be a big fall-off from the previous decade.  Still, his 100 points would be the top of the decade and he would win Oscars for Terminator 2 and Jurassic Park and earn nominations for Lost World and Phantom Menace.  Stan Winston would earn 80 points by sharing in those first three films with Muren.

  • Best Year:  1991
  • Worst Year:  1998
  • Best Winner:  Jurassic Park
  • Worst Winner:  Death Becomes Her
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace
  • Worst Nominee:  Dragonheart
  • Most Egregious Snub:  The Fifth Element
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  2.6
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.56
  • Score for the Decade:  79.0

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. The Fifth Element
  2. Heavenly Creatures
  3. Men in Black
  4. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
  5. Stargate

Top 5 in Points in the Decade:

  1. Dennis Muren  –  120
  2. Stan Winston  –  100
  3. Ken Ralston  –  80
  4. Phil Tippett  –  80
  5. Michael Lantieri  /  Allen Hall  –  80

Top 5 in Points through 1999:

  1. Dennis Muren  –  420
  2. A. Arnold Gillespie  –  300
  3. Richard Edlund  –  280
  4. Ken Ralston  –  240
  5. Gordon Jennings  –  220

Best Sound Editing

This award would be fully established in this decade, with three nominees in every year.  The Academy would also start to list Semi-Finalists starting in 1996, so we can get a better idea of what films the Academy was considering, so we at least know Ronin was a Semi-Finalist in 1998 even if the Academy was too stupid to nominate it.

Some very odd choices in this category in the middle of the decade keep the Score from getting very high.  From 1994 to 1996 the Scores are 50.0, 34.8 and 15.0 before bouncing back with a 92 in 1997 and a perfect 100 in 1999.  1999, with nominations for Fight Club, Matrix and Phantom Menace is still one of the best years in history if not the best year, even if they gave the award to weakest of the three choices.

The winners are also great choices.  While twice they gave the award to the weakest nominee (1995, 1999), the other eight years they gave it to the best nominee and five of those were also the Nighthawk winner.

Gary Rydstrom would be the #1 designer of the decade, winning three Oscars (Terminator 2, Jurassic Park, Saving Private Ryan) and earning another nomination (Backdraft).  He would be followed by Richard Hymns (who shared those awards for Jurassic Park and Saving Private Ryan and would earn noms for Backdraft and Fight Club) and Bruce Stambler (who would win an Oscar for The Ghost and the Darkness and earn noms for Under Siege, The Fugitive, Clear and Present Danger and Batman Forever).

  • Best Year:  1999
  • Worst Year:  1996
  • Best Winner:  The Hunt for Red October
  • Worst Winner:  Braveheart
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace
  • Worst Nominee:  Forrest Gump
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Heat
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  3.9
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.4
  • Score for the Decade:  68.2

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Heat
  2. Ronin
  3. Apollo 13
  4. The Rock
  5. The Last of the Mohicans

Top 5 in Points in the Decade:

  1. Gary Rydstrom  –  140
  2. Richard Hymns  –  120
  3. Bruce Stambler  –  120
  4. George Watters  –  100
  5. John Leveque  –  80

Top 5 in Points through 1999:

  1. Benjamin Burtt  –  220
  2. Richard Hymns  –  180
  3. Charles L. Campbell  –  140
  4. Stephen Hunter Flick  –  140
  5. Gary Rydstrom  –  140

Best Costume Design

age2It’s a decade for good choices in this category.  The score is not only the best for this category to date (85.9), but also the best among all Tech categories in this decade.  Only three winners will rank below 2nd on my list and the only winner below 4th is Cyrano de Bergerac (7th).  Three years earn a 90 or higher (1992, 1997, 1998) and even the lowest year, 1995, is still a 74.3.

No designer wins more than one Oscar in the decade.  Sandy Powell wins an Oscar and earns three other nominations.  Jenny Beaven earns four nominations but fails to win.  In 1998 we get the first Sandy Powell / Colleen Atwood competition, which Powell wins.  Powell has only won an Oscar in years when Atwood was also nominated and vice versa.  Six times they have competed against each other at the Oscars and each time one of those two won the Oscar, while any year where only one is nominated (1993 and 1997 for Powell this decade, 1999 for Atwood), they do not win.

  • Best Year:  1997
  • Worst Year:  1995
  • Best Winner:  The Age of Innocence
  • Worst Winner:  Cyrano de Bergerac
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Dick Tracy
  • Worst Nominee:  Braveheart
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Interview with the Vampire
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  2.3
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.7
  • Score for the Decade:  85.9

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Interview with the Vampire
  2. Raise the Red Lantern
  3. Ridicule
  4. Farewell My Concubine
  5. Much Ado About Nothing

Top 5 Points in the Decade:

  1. Sandy Powell  –  75
  2. Jenny Beavan  –  60
  3. Albert Wolsky  –  45
  4. John Bright  –  45
  5. Ann Roth  /  Colleen Atwood  /  Janet Patterson  –  45

Top 10 Points through 1999:

  1. Edith Head  –  645
  2. Irene Sharaff  –  300
  3. Charles LeMaire  –  285
  4. Jean Louis  –  225
  5. Dorothy Jeakins  –  225
  6. Helen Rose  –  180
  7. Walter Plunkett  –  165
  8. Bill Thomas  –  165
  9. Gile Steele  –  120
  10. Mary Wills  /  Anthony Powell  /  Milena Canonero  /  Jenny Beavan  –  120

note:  Anthony Powell joins the list in 1991 becoming the first designer to join this list since 1971.  Canonero and Beavan join the list in 1999.  Finally, in 2001, Canonero and Beaven will each earn additional nominations and 120 points will no longer be enough to make this list.

Best Makeup

bramThis category would not be particularly strong in the decade.  Only once would the score pass 75, with a 91.3 in 1998.  But only once would it drop below 50, dropping all the way to 0 in 1995.  While the nominees weren’t great, the Academy usually made a wise choice among the nominees, picking the best of the nominees 7 of the 10 times.

There is still a good chance that a Makeup nominee won’t earn other nominations.  Ten of the 31 films nominated for Makeup in this decade earn no other nominations.  But seven Best Picture nominees earn Makeup nominees, including five winners.  Bizarrely enough, four of those five films actual lose their Makeup nomination.  No film wins the period piece trifecta (Art Direction, Costume Design, Makeup) that Amadeus won in 1984.  Titanic and Shakespeare in Love both win Art Direction and Costume Design but lose Makeup.  Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Topsy-Turvy both win Costume Design and Makeup but lose Art Direction.  Dick Tracy wins Art Direction and Makeup but loses Costume Design.

Rick Baker continues to dominate, earning as many points in this decade as all but two other Makeup artists have earned in their whole careers, winning the Oscar in 1994, 1996 and 1997 and earning a nomination in 1999.  By decade’s end, Baker will have 130 points, which is still more than anyone else has today.  Surprisingly, though, he is beaten out in the decade by Greg Cannom, who wins in 1992 and 1993 and earns nominations in 1991, 1992 (aside from his win), 1995, 1997 and 1999.

Starting in 1999, the Academy would publish a list of Semi-Finalists.  That year, the Semi-Finalists included the four eventual nominees and Blast from the Past but not Phantom Menace, Sleepy Hollow or Fight Club.  It’s only the presence of Topsy-Turvy that prevents it from being the worst year of the decade.

  • Best Year:  1998
  • Worst Year:  1995
  • Best Winner:  Bram Stoker’s Dracula
  • Worst Winner:  Braveheart
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Batman Returns
  • Worst Nominee:  Bicentennial Man
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Interview with the Vampire
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  4.4
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.5
  • Score for the Decade:  56.8

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Interview with the Vampire
  2. Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace
  3. Sleepy Hollow
  4. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
  5. Velvet Goldmine

Top 3 Points in the Decade:

  1. Greg Cannom  –  90
  2. Rick Baker  –  70
  3. Ve Neill  –  50

Top 5 Points through 1999:

  1. Rick Baker  –  130
  2. Greg Cannom  –  90
  3. Ve Neill  –  70
  4. Michele Burke  –  70
  5. Stan Winston  /  Michael Westmore  –  50

Best Song

Another decade and things haven’t improved.  In fact, they’re worse.  There are 19 songs in this decade that earn my highest rating (some of them might not be eligible, but it gets trickier to tell because of bad data at times at oscars.org).  Of those 19 songs, two of them won the Oscar (“Beauty and the Beast”, “Streets of Philadelphia”) and ironically, for a second decade in a row, neither of them won the Nighthawk.  Three others earn nominations (“Be Our Guest”, “Circle of Life”, “Blame Canada”) and again, none of those win the Nighthawk either.

The Academy grows a little bit this decade, giving an Oscar to Bruce Springsteen (and another nomination) and nominations for Neil Young and Aimee Mann.  They also embrace the lighter side of rock, with Oscars for Elton John and Phil Collins (both for Disney films) and four nominations for Randy Newman.  But it’s Alan Menken who is the big winner this decade, winning three Oscars and earning four other nominations.  After years of Disney being ignored or being nominated but failing to win, Menken heralds the short era of Disney dominance in this category.  Tim Rice comes next, writing the lyrics for a Menken win, the lyrics for the Elton John win and then winning an Oscar with his old stage collaborator Andrew Lloyd Weber.  Amid a lot of crap, the Academy does at least give a nomination to “Blame Canada” which was really daring.

  • Best Year:  1991
  • Worst Year:  1998
  • Best Winner:  “Streets of Philadelphia” from Philadelphia
  • Worst Winner:  “When You Believe” from The Prince of Egypt
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  “Circle of Life” from The Lion King
  • Worst Nominee:  “The Day I Fall in Love” from Beethoven’s 2nd
  • Most Egregious Snub:  “The Great Beyond” from Man on the Moon
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  6.4
  • Average Winner Rank among nominees:  2.1
  • Score for the Decade:  58.0

5 Most Egregious Snubs:

  1. “The Great Beyond” from Man on the Moon
  2. “Thief of Your Heart” from In the Name of the Father
  3. “Can’t Even Tell” from Clerks
  4. “The Flame Still Burns” from Still Crazy
  5. “Walls” from She’s the One

Top 5 in Points in the Decade:

  1. Alan Menken  –  100
  2. Tim Rice  –  80
  3. Howard Ashman  –  50
  4. Randy Newman  –  40
  5. Diane Warren  /  Stephen Schwartz  /  Elton John  –  40

Top 10 in Points through 1999:

  1. Sammy Cahn  –  300
  2. Johnny Mercer  –  220
  3. Paul Francis Webster  –  190
  4. James Van Heusen  –  180
  5. Marilyn Bergman  –  170
  6. Alan Bergman  –  170
  7. Harry Warren  –  140
  8. Alan Menken  –  140
  9. Ned Washington  –  130
  10. Henry Mancini  –  130

Best Foreign Film

allaboutThere are 80 films in this decade that earn ***.5 and thus earn consideration for my Best Foreign Film award.  Six of those won the Oscar and another 14 were nominated.  But 17 of them were submitted to the Oscars and were not nominated.  Of the 16 **** films in the decade, three would be submitted and not nominated (Princess Mononoke, Three Colors: White, Run Lola Run) while one other would be submitted and rejected by the Academy as ineligible (Three Colors: Red).  Thankfully, the best Foreign Film of the decade would win the Oscar (All About My Mother).

There are 17 countries that submit a film every year in the decade.  A whopping seven of them fail to earn a nomination, over three times as all the decades previously.  The biggest country on the list is Japan, with its first decade without a nomination.  It is joined by Hungary, Israel, Canada, Mexico, Austria and India.  None of the 17 countries have more than a 40% nomination rate, making this the first decade in which France is nominated less than half the time.  The only countries with more than two submissions that earn a 50% nomination rate are Russia (4 for 7, although it would be 4 for 9 if we included the two years of the USSR submitting) and Brazil (3 for 5).  Only four countries earn four nominations (Russia, France, Italy, Spain) and they all win at least once.  The only countries to win twice are France, Spain and the Netherlands (which wins both times it is nominated).  Brazil, Germany and Sweden have the most nominations without a win (3).  Seventy-nine different countries submit at least once, far more than in the 80’s and helped by the breakup of the USSR and Yugoslavia.

Europe wins all 10 Oscars during the decade, with the 1994 Oscar to Russia and the 1996 to the Czech Republic the only ones not won by Western Europe.  Europe’s domination of the nominations drops a bit (down from 39 to 34) but Western Europe is still dominant (23).  In fact, even with Western Europe contributing only 46.4% of the European submissions (104 of 224), down from 50.3% in the 80’s, this time it accounts for 67.6% of the European nominations, down from 56.4% in the 80’s.  In fact, Western Europe accounts for just over 1/4 of all submissions (104 of 400) but account for almost half of the nominations.  The number of Asian submissions steadily rises during the decade and the nominations go up from 3 in the 80’s to 8 in this decade.  Likewise, South America almost doubles its submissions from the decade before and over doubles its nominations.

The big directors of the decade aren’t that well-known, with Nikita Mikhalkov, Jan Sverak and Regis Wargnier all earning a win and another nomination.  More well-known are Ang Lee (two nominations), Zhang Yimou (two nominations) and Pedro Almodovar (only one nomination but he wins).  Jose Luis Garci also earns his fourth and final nomination.

  • Best Year:  1996  **
  • Worst Year:  1992
  • Best Winner:  All About My Mother
  • Worst Winner:  Indochine
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Raise the Red Lantern
  • Worst Nominee:  Farinelli: Il Castrato
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Princess Mononoke  ***
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  11.2
  • Average Winner Rank among nominees:  2.8
  • Score for the Decade:  55.0  *

*  –  The Score for the Decade is based only on submitted films.  Though I think the Academy’s rules are stupid, I can only grade them on what was allowed within the rules.  So, in 1994, the grade does not reflect the absence of Mina Tannenbaum which was not submitted but it does reflect the absence of Three Colors: White which was submitted but not nominated.  Full lists of what was submitted can be found here.
**  –  1996 is the best year by Oscar Score, because the only submitted film worth nominating, Ridicule, was nominated.  By film average, the best year is 1990 (78.4), just barely over 1994 (78.2), but 1994 has a pretty weak score (45.5) because so many submitted films were better than the nominated films.
***  –  Not counting Three Colors: Red since it was rejected.

princess_mononoke_japanese_poster_movie5 Most Egregious Snubs:

  1. Princess Mononoke
  2. Three Colors: White
  3. Run Lola Run
  4. Like Water for Chocolate
  5. Aimee and Jaguar

note:  The top three are all ****.  I didn’t list Three Colors: Red since it was deemed ineligible and thus is not a snub.

5 Best Films not submitted:

  1. Europa Europa
  2. Ringu
  3. Three Colors: Blue
  4. Les Miserables
  5. Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams

5 Worst Submissions (in relation between the film not submitted and the film submitted):

explanation:  On a 100 point scale, the biggest difference between the film that was submitted and what I thought was the best film from that country.  It only works if I have seen the submitted film (which is why Japan isn’t more heavily represented – I have only seen half their submissions in this decade).  For the list above, blame goes on the Academy’s system.  For this list, the blame goes on the submitting country.  There are 27 times in this decade where a country submitted a film, I’ve seen that film, and I think a different film should have been submitted.  In 11 of those times, the point difference is less than 10.  This decade there are a lot more times between 10 and 18 (11 times).  These last five are the most egregious.  Most of them aren’t as bad as the previous decade but the top one on the list almost matches the record set last decade.  Several countries are on the list twice but only two appear more than twice: Hong Kong (1993, 1994, 1996) and France (every year except 1996).  The only film France submitted that was actually the best French film I have seen from that year, it was Ridicule, the best Foreign Film of the year, and it was nominated but, annoyingly, lost the Oscar.
Six times the submission was actually nominated (in two cases, Beyond Silence and Farewell My Concubine, they are good enough to be nominated, just not as good as the films that were passed over for them, Winter Sleepers and The Heroic Trio).  In one case, the film actually won the Oscar (Indochine).

  1. 1992 Canada  –  Leolo submitted instead of Masala  (48 pts)
  2. 1998 Japan  –  Begging for Love submitted instead of Ringu  (23 pts)
  3. 1995 China  –  Red Cherry submitted instead of Shanghai Triad  (21 pts)
  4. 1994 France  –  Wild Reeds submitted instead of Mina Tannenbaum  (19 pts)
  5. 1991 France  –  Van Gogh submitted instead of The Lovers on the Bridge  (19 pts)

note:  Leolo is the worst submitted film I have ever seen (at least through 2007).  It’s so bad that Masala, a low-range *** makes this list over some really great films.

Top 5 Countries in Points during the Decade:

  1. Italy  –  120
  2. Spain  –  120
  3. France  –  100
  4. Russia  –  100
  5. The Netherlands  –  80

Top 5 Countries in Points through 1999 (not including Special Awards):

  1. France  –  780
  2. Italy  –  720
  3. Spain  –  420
  4. Sweden  –  300
  5. USSR  –  240

Top 5 Countries in Points through 1999  (including Special Awards):

  1. France  –  900
  2. Italy  –  800
  3. Spain  –  420
  4. Japan  –  320
  5. Sweden  –  300

Submission Statistics:

  • Western Europe: 104 submissions, 23 nominees, 8 winners
  • Eastern Europe:  34 submissions, 6 nominees, 2 winners
  • Scandinavia:  36 submissions, 4 nominees
  • Balkans:  37 submissions, 1 nominee
  • Europe (total):  224 submissions, 34 nominees, 10 winners
  • Middle East:  22 submissions, 1 nominee
  • Asia, incl. ME:  95 submissions, 9 nominees
  • South America:  42 submissions, 5 nominees
  • North America:  29 submissions, 1 nominee
  • Africa:  11 submissions, 1 nominee

Other Categories

The following categories didn’t yet exist by 1999: Animated Film.

By Year

1990

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1990
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  # 26
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  4.32
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  4.44
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  2.11
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  65.5
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  86.3
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  74.3
  • Total Nominee Score:  75.2

1991

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1991
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  9
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  2.42
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  2.50
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.53
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  79.2
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  86.6
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  84.6 (highest to-date)
  • Total Nominee Score:  83.5  (highest to-date)

1992

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1992
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  30
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  5.26
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  5.50
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.84
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  70.8
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  87.0
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  78.0
  • Total Nominee Score:  76.5

1993

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1993
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  10
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  3.47
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  3.61
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.89
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  75.5
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  95.2
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  77.6
  • Total Nominee Score:  79.2

1994

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1994
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  3
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  8.32
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  6.67
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  2.47
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  81.9
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  83.0
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  70.9
  • Total Nominee Score:  75.2

1995

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1995
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  64
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  14.70  (worst since 1958)
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  8.11  (worst since 1958)
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  2.35
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  51.5  (lowest since 1965)
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  87.3
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  54.9  (lowest since 1977)
  • Total Nominee Score:  63.1  (lowest since 1977)

1996

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1996
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  11
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  6.15
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  6.32
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.80
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  71.6
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  80.3
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  73.8
  • Total Nominee Score:  74.2

1997

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1997
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  27
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  7.65
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  5.89
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  2.30
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  74.4
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  82.2
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  77.8
  • Total Nominee Score:  75.8

1998

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1998
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  37
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  5.45
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  5.63
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.85
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  70.0
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  84.4
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  76.9
  • Total Nominee Score:  73.0

1999

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1999
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  42
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  4.68
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  4.89
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  2.26
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  68.7
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  84.8
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  72.7
  • Total Nominee Score:  73.7
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