Introduction

coppolasThis is a companion piece to three different series.  The first is The History of the Academy Awards, in which I covered each category in individual posts.  This was originally done in 2009 and additions were included in 2010.  You can find links to all of these pieces in each individual category.  I have grouped all of the categories together for the same reason that I did so originally – because most pieces on the Oscars don’t approach the awards through the categories, but through the years.  This specific piece is designed to take a closer look at the decade and how I think the Academy did in those years.

The second series is my Year in Film series.  That is mentioned here because in those pieces I included paragraphs about the Oscars as a whole for each year and included a considerable amount of trivia.  Since I had based my Year in Film series and eligibility as such on the Academy calendar, it all seemed very relevant.  Also, I include various prizes (Worst Oscar, Worst Nomination, Worst Omission, etc) and I didn’t want to repeat myself, so following the links will bring you there.  Those links are at the end of this piece, where I do a brief summation of each year and how the Academy did.  One note on the Year in Film posts – I did those before Oscars.org started putting up official information about release dates.  Several films have been moved from the years where they appeared in those posts – see the Nighthawk Awards posts for more accurate placement – I have included links in the years.

The third series is my History of the Academy Awards: Best Picture series, where I reviewed every film ever nominated for Best Picture (except The Patriot, which is lost).  Those links are also down below, grouped by year.

Keys to all the Numbers / Ranks / Scores, etc:  There are a lot of numbers and lists down below.  The lists are often easy to understand, the numbers not so much.

  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  That takes the winner (say, Actor in 1945) and says where I would rank it for the year (#1 in this case).  Then I average it out, either for category (the first part) or by year (the bottom part).  The closer to 1, the better.
  • Average Winner Rank (without Picture):  Because I rank all films for the year but don’t rank every film in every category, the Best Picture category can really throw things off, especially since every film is eligible in this category.  So, in a year like 1932-33, where Best Picture (Cavalcade) is my #99 film of the year but no other winner ranks below #22, the average winner rank goes from 9.13 to 19.11.  So, down below, in the years, I include a score both with and without Best Picture.  This one is not quite as relevant in this decade, where there were no egregiously bad choices for Best Picture.
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  Quite simply what it says.  Cavalcade may have ranked 99th on the year, but only 8th among the 10 Best Picture nominees.  The key is this – the first Average Winner rank tells you what I think of the winner.  This one tells you what I think in relation to what they nominated.  Like, in Best Art Direction (color), where from 1946 to 1949 my Winner Ranks are 6, 1, 1 and 5.  But all four of them were the best choice among the nominees, so the score was 1, 1, 1, 1.  A high disproportion between the two scores means I think they botched the nominees, but that will show up in the Score.  Again, the closer to 1, the better.
  • Score:  This is a score of their nominees versus mine.  It’s complicated and bizarre and has to do with assigning a numeric value to a function of art.  But it measures a year against itself.  1978 is a good example – not a single one of my Best Picture nominees from 1978 would have made my list for 1977.  But if the Academy and I agreed 5 for 5, it would still score 100.  It’s a comparison between what the Oscars nominated and what I think they should have nominated, not a comparison to any other year.  Suffice it to say, the closer to 100 the better.  By the way, the Score determines the Best and Worst Year in everything except Picture, which is ranked based on my original ranked list.
  • Score  (P-D-S):  The score, averaged among Picture, Director and Screenplay.
  • Score  (Acting):  The score, averaged among the four acting categories.
  • Score  (Tech):  The score, averaged among Editing, Cinematography, Score, Sound, Art Direction, Visual Effects and Costume Design (and in later decades Sound Editing and Makeup).

Stats and Trivia for the Decade:

  • Most Nominations:
  1. The Godfather Part II
  2. Chinatown
  3. Star Wars
  4. Julia
  5. The Turning Point

note: These films, all with 11 nominations, are all from just two years, 1974 and 1977.  The Academy doesn’t list Star Wars with 11 nominations but I count a special award as a nomination.

  • Most Oscars:
  1. Cabaret  (8)
  2. Patton  /  The Sting  /  Star Wars  (7)
  3. The Godfather Part II  (6)

note: Two films on this list didn’t even win Best Picture, including the top film.

  • TheGodfatherPartIIMost Points:
  1. The Godfather Part II  (560)
  2. Patton  (540)
  3. One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest (515)
  4. Cabaret  (510)
  5. Kramer vs. Kramer  (510)
  6. Network  (490)
  7. The Sting  (490)
  8. The Deer Hunter (470)
  9. The French Connection  (465)
  10. Star Wars  (455)

note: Cabaret has the second most points all-time for a film that didn’t win Best Picture.  The three films on this list that didn’t win are all in place of the winners of those years: The Godfather came in 12th (445), Rocky came in 13th (440) and Annie Hall came in 16th (375).

  • Number of Films Nominated for a Feature Film Oscar:  327
  • Number of Films Nominated for Multiple Oscars:  161
  • Number of Films to win a Feature Film Oscar:  96
  • Number of Films to win multiple Oscars:  34
  • Most Nominations without Best Picture:  The Poseidon Adventure / Close Encounters of the Third Kind  (9)  * / **
  • Most Oscars without winning Best Picture:  Cabaret  (8)  *
  • Most Oscars without a Best Picture nomination:  six films  (2)
  • Most Points without a Best Picture nomination:  Close Encounters of the Third Kind  (275)
  • Most Nominations with No Wins:  The Turning Point  (11)  *
  • Films Nominated for All 4 Acting Categories:  Network  /  Coming Home  ***
  • Films Nominated for All 5 Major Tech Categories:  Patton  /  Airport  /  Cabaret  /  The Poseidon Adventure  /  The Sting  /  The Towering Inferno  /  Chinatown  /  Close Encounters of the Third Kind  ****
  • Films to Win All 5 Major Tech Categories:  none  *****

*  –  still a record
**  –  as mentioned above, I count a special award as a nomination, which is why I count Close Encounters with nine
***  –  There have been 15 films to do this.  These are the only two to win both Actor and Actress (in fact, the only two to win Actor at all).
****  –  Cabaret and The Sting join My Fair Lady and The Sound of Music as the only films to do this with an Adapted Score nomination.
*****  –  Cabaret came closest with four wins

  • Director with Most Films Nominated for Best Picture:
  1. Francis Ford Coppola  (4)  –  two of which would win
  2. Bob Fosse  (3)
  • Director with Most Films Nominated for an Oscar:
  1. Sidney Lumet  /  Martin Ritt  /  Hal Ashby  (6)
  2. Herbert Ross  /  Franklin J. Schaffner  /  Arthur Hiller  (5)
  • coppola-anowDirector with Most Total Nominations for their Films:
  1. Francis Ford Coppola  (32)
  2. Sidney Lumet  (31)
  3. Herbert Ross  (28)
  4. Bob Fosse  (25)
  5. Hal Ashby  (24)

note:  Fosse is the most effective, as he only made three films in the decade, but Coppola is just behind as he only made four.

  • Director with Most Oscars for their Films:
  1. Bob Fosse  (12)
  2. Francis Ford Coppola  (11)
  3. Franklin J. Schaffner  (9)
  4. George Roy Hill  (8)
  5. Hal Ashby  /  William Freidkin  /  George Lucas  (7)

note:  Coppola also won one of the Oscars for a film Schaffner directed.  Coppola himself won five Oscars in the decade.

  • Director with Most Points for their Films:
  1. Francis Ford Coppola  (1415)
  2. Sidney Lumet  (1205)
  3. Bob Fosse  (1075)
  4. Hal Ashby  (980)
  5. Herbert Ross  (935)
  • Screenshot_20th_Century_Fox_Logo_in_1975Studio with Most Best Picture Nominees:
  1. 20th Century-Fox  (10)
  2. United Artists  /  Warner Bros  (9)
  3. Paramount  /  Columbia  (7)
  • Studio with Most Best Picture Wins:
  1. United Artists  (3)
  2. 20th Century-Fox  /  Paramount  /  Universal  (2)

note on Studios:  There were 8 major studios during this era (including Disney as a major at this point) and they continued to dominate Best Picture. Only three nominated films didn’t come from the majors: Cabaret (Allied Artists), Cries and Whispers (New World) and A Touch of Class (Avco Embassy).  Disney would fail to earn a nomination, but of the others, Warners would be the only one not to win Best Picture in the decade, a drought that extended from 1964 to 1981.  Universal did quite well in this decade, earning five nominations, which was as many at it earned in the 42 years prior to this decade.

Best Picture

The Best Actor streak with Best Picture continues – every winner in the decade is at least nominated for Best Actor and five of them win.  But the anti-Best Actress streak finally ends.  One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest becomes the first film to win both Picture and Actress since 1942.  It carries over into the supporting races; seven of the Picture winners are nominated for Supporting Actor while only three are nominated for Supporting Actress.  Every winner is nominated for Director and Screenplay, eight of them for Editing and six for Cinematography.  Annie Hall, on the other hand, becomes the first winner since 1934 to not be nominated for a single Tech award.  Patton, meanwhile, would be the only Picture winner between 1959 and 1994 to be nominated for Visual Effects and the only winner after 1942 to lose in Visual Effects.  Rocky would be the only winner between 1958 and 1997 to be nominated for Song and, until 2002, the only winner to lose in Song.  Jaws would be the only film between 1954 and 2000 to win all of its awards except Picture – it would also be the only Picture nominee between 1969 and 1991 to not earn Director, Screenplay or any acting nominations.

Three actors would be in three Best Picture winners, all of them Godfather alumni: Talia Shire (Rocky), Diane Keaton (Annie Hall) and John Cazale (The Deer Hunter).  Cazale is also in two other nominees (The Conversation, Dog Day Afternoon) while Robert Duvall is in two winners (Godfathers) and four other nominees (M*A*S*H, The Conversation, Network, Apocalypse Now).  At the end of the decade, Christopher Walken (Annie Hall, The Deer Hunter) and Meryl Streep (The Deer Hunter, Kramer vs Kramer) would be in back-to-back winners.  Streep would join Clark Gable as the only actors to this-date to earn back-to-back Oscar noms in Best Picture winners.

The nominees are vastly improved in a variety of ways.  First of all, the films are simply better.  The average Best Picture nominee in this decade is an 84.7 (high-range ***.5), and after 1970 they average an 86.1 and after 1971 an 87.  Five years have a higher average than the previous best year.  Also, they make better choices among the films available.  Prior to this year, only three years had a score of above a 64.  In this decade, only one year (1977) has a score below a 64 and five of them are higher than a 75.  Even the winners are better, averaging a rank of 143, a 24 spot improvement over the previous decade.  It is true that they rarely pick my #1 film – only two Best Picture winners win the Nighthawk (The Godfather, The Deer Hunter), but they almost always nominate it – Alien is the only Nighthawk winner not to be at least nominated for Best Picture.  And at least they are still good choices – eight of the Best Picture winners are among the Top 200 nominees and this is the only decade that can boast that.

I have already said so much on this category in my other posts (see at the bottom, listed under each year).

  • Best Year:  1973
  • Worst Year:  1970
  • Best Winner:  The Godfather
  • Worst Winner:  Rocky
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Chinatown
  • Worst Nominee:  Love Story
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Alien
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  4.0
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.5
  • Score for the Decade:  70.8

godfather1Winners (ranked):

  1. The Godfather
  2. Annie Hall
  3. The Godfather Part II
  4. The French Connection
  5. The Deer Hunter
  6. The Sting
  7. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
  8. Kramer vs. Kramer
  9. Patton
  10. Rocky

chinatown210 Best Nominees That Didn’t Win:

  1. Chinatown
  2. Cries and Whispers
  3. Star Wars
  4. A Clockwork Orange
  5. All the President’s Men
  6. M*A*S*H
  7. Apocalypse Now
  8. Jaws
  9. The Last Picture Show
  10. The Exorcist

love-story-movie-poster-1970-102046376710 Worst Nominees (#1 being the Worst)

  1. Love Story
  2. Airport
  3. Nicholas and Alexandra
  4. The Towering Inferno
  5. Nashville
  6. A Touch of Class
  7. The Turning Point
  8. Norma Rae
  9. An Unmarried Woman
  10. Fiddler on the Roof

note:  There is an enormous gap between the first four and the other six of nearly 70 spots on the all-time list.  The first four are all in the bottom 15.

ALIEN v4 Silver Ferox DesignTen Biggest Snubs:

  1. Alien
  2. Day for Night
  3. Scenes from a Marriage
  4. Mean Streets
  5. The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
  6. Aguirre the Wrath of God
  7. McCabe & Mrs. Miller
  8. Manhattan
  9. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  10. Sleuth

note:  This is the only decade where no film on this list is in my Top 10 for the decade – every Top 10 film was at least nominated.

Ten Biggest English-Language Snubs:

  1. Alien
  2. Mean Streets
  3. McCabe & Mrs. Miller
  4. Manhattan
  5. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  6. Sleuth
  7. Picnic at Hanging Rock
  8. Being There
  9. Badlands
  10. Serpico

Ten Studios with the Most Points (through 1979):

  1. MGM  –  3200
  2. United Artists  –  3050
  3. 20th Century-Fox  –  2950
  4. Warner Bros  –  2550
  5. Columbia  –  2250
  6. Paramount  –  2150
  7. RKO  –  1000
  8. Universal  –  650
  9. First National  –  150
  10. Rank / Two Cities  /  Embassy  /  Allied Artists  –  100

note:  The only difference from the last decade is the addition of Allied Artists.  Paramount had actually passed Columbia in 1974, but was passed again when Columbia won Best Picture in 1979.

Best Director

 

Robert-De-Niro-and-Francis-Ford-Coppola-on-set-on-The-Godfather-part-IIThe decade for Best Director was really known as the battle between Bob Fosse and Francis Ford Coppola.  In 1972, Fosse would win over Coppola while Coppola’s film would win Best Picture.  In 1974, Coppola would take home both the big awards at Fosse’s expense.  In 1979, though both would be nominated again, neither would win Best Director and both films would go home without the top prize.  It wasn’t the first time directors had faced off three times (Wyler and Ford went against each other three straight years from 39-41, Wyler and Stevens were both nominated against each other three times in the 50’s and Wilder and Zinnemann three times from 53 to 60).  But in an era where people didn’t make as many films, this was odd, especially as these were the only three films Fosse made in the decade (the long gap between the nominations in 74 and 79 is accounted for by Coppola taking so long to make Apocalypse Now while Fosse was directing Chicago on stage and having the heart attack that provided the story for his film).

This decade is a bit painful.  Aside from the top four directors in points (Fosse and Coppola, as well as Friedkin and Allen who both won an Oscar and were nominated once more), there are 12 directors with 90 points.  Look at the directors who won the other six Oscars: Franklin J. Schaffner, George Roy Hill, Milos Forman, John G. Avildsen, Michael Cimino, Robert Benton.  Not a great group aside from Forman while Avildsen and Cimino are pretty bad directors.  Now look at the six directors who earned two nominations in the decade but didn’t win an Oscar: Altman, Fellini, Kubrick, Bergman, Lucas and Lumet.  That’s one hell of a list.  All of them were in my Top 100 and all but Lucas were in the top 40.  Terrible circumstances that those who were the six who didn’t win and even more so when you realize those six never won an Oscar.  They had earned five combined nominations before this decade and would earn five more after it but none of those six would even win a directing Oscar.

This is reflected in the Average Winner’s Rank.  Among all films, it’s a big improvement over the 60’s, down from 7.1 to 4.4  But, among the nominees, it actually goes up, from 2.2 to 2.8.  That’s because only once did the Academy pick the best choice (1978) and twice they picked the worst (1973, 1976).  But, four times the Academy picked the second best choice (1970, 1971, 1974, 1977) in a year where the best choice was also nominated.

You must also remember that this is the decade that saw the rise of Spielberg and Scorsese, both of whom were notably not nominated with their films in 1975 and 1976 respectively (Spielberg would earn his first nomination in 77 without a Best Picture nom but Scorsese would have to wait until the 80’s).

Unlike the 60’s, where only two directors nominated in the whole decade would later win an Oscar, this decade has several future winners, including three in the 80’s (Beatty, Forman, Bertolucci) and two other later winners (Spielberg, Scorsese).

The directors continue to be better picks than the films.  Best Picture never scores above 80 but twice this category scores above a 90 (1972 – 91.7, 1973 – 95.1).  Only two years (1970, 1979) have worse scores for Best Director than for Best Picture.  While films such as Nicholas and Alexandra, A Touch of Class and The Towering Inferno were being nominated for Best Picture, they were being bumped in the Best Director race for films like Sunday Bloody Sunday, Last Tango in Paris and Day for Night.

  • Best Year:  1973
  • Worst Year:  1970
  • Best Winner:  Francis Ford Coppola  (The Godfather Part II)
  • Worst Winner:  John G. Avildsen  (Rocky)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Francis Ford Coppola  (The Godfather)
  • Worst Nominee:  Arthur Hiller  (Love Story)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Steven Spielberg  (Jaws)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  4.4
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.8
  • Score for the Decade:  78.6

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Steven Spielberg  (Jaws)
  2. Ridley Scott  (Alien)
  3. Martin Scorsese  (Mean Streets)
  4. Martin Scorsese  (Taxi Driver)
  5. Werner Herzog  (Aguirre the Wrath of God)

Top 5 in Points for the Decade:

  1. Francis Ford Coppola  –  180
  2. Bob Fosse  –  180
  3. William Friedkin  –  135
  4. Woody Allen  –  135
  5. 12 directors  –  90

Top 10 in Points (through 1979):

  1. William Wyler  –  675
  2. Billy Wilder  –  450
  3. Frank Capra  –  405
  4. John Ford  –  405
  5. David Lean  –  360
  6. Fred Zinnemann  –  360
  7. George Stevens  –  315
  8. Elia Kazan  –  315
  9. Clarence Brown  –  270
  10. George Cukor  /  Joseph L. Mankiewicz  –  270

note:  The only change to this list is the addition of Mankiewicz, having earned a nomination in 1972.  Directors will be added in 1986 and 1989 but it won’t really change substantially until 1998.

Best Writing:

Francis Ford Coppola has the fastest rise of any screenwriter in history, in half the decade going from 0 points to a tie for 5th place with 280 points.  In the decade he would win three writing Oscars (one Original, two Adapted) and earn two other nominations (one Original, one Adapted).  Also earning starts this decade are Woody Allen (one win, two other nominations), Barry Levinson (one nom) and Oliver Stone (win for Adapted).  Finishing their Oscar writing careers this decade are John Huston (after earning no nominations in the 60’s) and Federico Fellini (earning two writing nominations but no wins for the fourth straight decade).  Robert Towne becomes the first writer ever to earn three consecutive nominations, then a few years later Woody Allen does the same thing.

The single nomination nominee would still flourish, but not as much as in previous decades with only 67 (as opposed to the 100 from the 60’s).  Foreign Films would also continue to be big, with 7 nominations in the first three years alone and 18 nominations in the decade (all losses).  The streak of consecutive years with at least one writing nominee in a foreign language that began in 1959 will continue through 1980.

Various people who aren’t generally thought of as writers (or at least film writers) who earn nominations this decade include Peter Bogdanovich, Bob Fosse, Larry McMurtry, Gene Wilder and Sylvester Stallone.

Best Screenplay Based on Material From Another Medium / Best Screenplay Adapted from Other Material

The name games continue.  That latter name would only last for two years (1974 and 1975) and then revert back to the former.

A fantastic decade for winners.  The only winner that isn’t my #1 or 2 for the year is Julia.  The nominees, though, are only moderately improved, going up three points to a 70.9.  That’s because the years are all over the place.  They rank as low as in the 50’s (1972 – 50.0, 1979 – 53.1) all the way up to the 80’s (1971 – 86.1) and even the second highest score to date (1974 – 93.3).

  • Best Year:  1974
  • Worst Year:  1972
  • Best Winner:  All the President’s Men
  • Worst Winner:  Julia
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Dr. Strangelove
  • Worst Nominee:  Airport
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Being There
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  2.0
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.5
  • Score for the Decade:  70.9

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Being There
  2. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
  3. Sleuth
  4. McCabe & Mrs. Miller
  5. Play It Again Sam

Best Story and Screenplay – Based on Factual Material or Material Not Previously Published or Produced / Best Original Screenplay / Best Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen

The first name above would last from 1970 to 1973 and would account for the nomination for Young Winston and the Oscar for Patton, neither of which would be considered as original in any other years.  Then it would have the second name for just two years.  Finally, in 1976, the two categories would settle into names for the long-term.

 

The nominees in this category are vastly improved and continue to improve through the decade.  1970 scores a 68.4, much higher than the averages for previous decades and it is the lowest score in the decade.  The only other year below a 77 is 1977 (71.0).  1975 earns an 89.3, the third highest score to-date.

The winners get a lot better in this decade.  Only one of them doesn’t earn a Nighthawk nomination (Coming Home) and there is a streak of four years in a row where I agree with the Oscar winners (74-77).  But it’s not a trend towards better winners; the Academy will get much worse in the 80’s in this category.

  • Best Year:  1975
  • Worst Year:  1970
  • Best Winner:  Chinatown
  • Worst Winner:  Coming Home
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Cries and Whispers
  • Worst Nominee:  Love Story
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Scenes from a Marriage
  • Most Egregious Eligible Snub:  Blazing Saddles
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  2.5
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.0
  • Score for the Decade:  79.3

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Scenes from a Marriage
  2. Blazing Saddles
  3. Harold and Maude
  4. Mean Streets
  5. Alien
  6. Face to Face

note:  There are six because Scenes was declared ineligible by the Academy.

Top 5 for Points on the Decade:

  1. Francis Ford Coppola  –  320
  2. Mario Puzo  –  160
  3. Robert Towne  –  160
  4. Paddy Chayefsky  –  160
  5. Woody Allen  –  160

Top 10 for Points through 1969:

  1. Billy Wilder  –  600
  2. Charles Brackett  –  400
  3. John Huston  –  360
  4. Ben Hecht  –  320
  5. Federico Fellini  –  320
  6. Francis Ford Coppola  –  320
  7. Joseph L. Mankiewicz  –  280
  8. Carl Foreman  –  280
  9. Paddy Chayefsky  –  280
  10. Robert Riskin  /  Michael Wilson  /  Richard Brooks  /  George Seaton  –  240

Best Actor

Randle_Patrick_McMurphy_pictureLet the new generation arise.  Jack Nicholson?  Four nominations, including a win.  Al Pacino?  Five nominations.  Robert De Niro?  Three nominations, including a win.  The two great young actors from Midnight Cowboy who both lost to John Wayne?  Both would win Oscars at the end of this decade.  It’s not a complete turnover to the younger actors – both Marlon Brando and Jack Lemmon would win their second Oscars this decade.

The lowest score in the decade – 1977’s 81.6 – is higher than the average score for the previous decade and the only other year below 88 is 1974.  But the average winner was only a 3.4.  So what does that mean?  It means they did a great job with the nominees but not so great at picking a winner.  Just look at 1978 and 1979, both of which earn perfect scores for the nominees and neither of which do I agree with the winner.  They are the first perfect scores in this category since 1928.  Only twice in the decade would I completely agree with the winner (Gene Hackman and Jack Nicholson) although only Art Carney lands outside the top 4 in his year.  This is the first acting category to earn a score over 90 in any decade.

  • Best Year:  1979
  • Worst Year:  1977
  • Best Winner:  Jack Nicholson  (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)
  • Worst Winner:  Art Carney  (Harry and Tonto)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Jack Nicholson  (Chinatown)
  • Worst Nominee:  Ryan O’Neal  (Love Story)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Gene Hackman  (The Conversation)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  3.4
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.6
  • Score for the Decade:  91.5

note:  –  1979 and 1978 both had scores of 100, but 1979 had the better group of nominees.

hackmanFive Biggest Snubs:

  1. Gene Hackman  (The Conversation)
  2. Erland Josephson  (Scenes from a Marriage)
  3. Klaus Kinski  (Aguirre the Wrath of God)
  4. Warren Beatty  (McCabe & Mrs. Miller)
  5. Martin Sheen  (Badlands)
  6. Juri Jarvet  (King Lear)

note:  I listed six because Josephson wasn’t eligible.  But three of these are from 1974 and all ranked higher than the actual Oscar winner.

Top 5 Points of the Decade (Actor only):

  1. Jack Nicholson  –  175
  2. Al Pacino  –  140
  3. George C. Scott  –  105
  4. Marlon Brando  –  105
  5. Peter Finch  /  Jack Lemmon  /  Dustin Hoffman  –  105

note:  Pacino comes in second without a win.

Top 10 Points through 1979  (Actor only):

  1. Spencer Tracy  –  385
  2. Laurence Olivier  –  350
  3. Marlon Brando  –  315
  4. Fredric March  –  245
  5. Gary Cooper  –  245
  6. Paul Muni  –  210
  7. James Stewart  –  210
  8. Gregory Peck  –  210
  9. Richard Burton  –  210
  10. Jack Lemmon  –  210

Best Actress

Annie-Hall_-Diane-Keaton1The Academy mostly did better with the winners this decade.  Seven of them are in my Top 15 for the decade and another was just outside.  Then there are Sally Field and Glenda Jackson’s second Oscar.  Field at least earns a Nighthawk nomination.  Jackson finishes 10th in 1973.

On the whole, the score is quite good, an 88.9, which would be the best acting score to date if not for Best Actor in this decade.  But this is the only acting category that has nominees who don’t even make my list (Ali MacGraw in 1970, Janet Suzman in 1971).  Those years aren’t dinged too bad on the score because there weren’t such great performances that were snubbed. Two years in the decade earn perfect scores, the first in this category since 1951.  In fact, the only year to score below an 80, 1973, which earned a 68.4, was not because of bad nominees but because of the snubs for Cries and Whispers.

In fact, Liv Ullmann is the main person on the snub list below.  The Academy just couldn’t seem to recognize that she was far and away the greatest actress of the decade, giving her just two nominations, both of which she lost.

The real dominant actresses of the decade were Jane Fonda and Glenda Jackson, both of whom won two Oscars and managed to add two more nominations to go with those Oscars in the decade.

  • Best Year:  1972  /  1977
  • Worst Year:  1973
  • Best Winner:  Diane Keaton  (Annie Hall)
  • Worst Winner:  Glenda Jackson  (A Touch of Class)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Faye Dunaway  (Chinatown)
  • Worst Nominee:  Ali MacGraw  (Love Story)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Liv Ullmann  (Cries and Whispers)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  2.7
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.9
  • Score for the Decade:  88.9

note:  1972 and 1977 both had perfect scores of 100 and both had the same total score, so there’s no way to make a choice.  I suppose I could give the edge to 1977 in that the Oscar winner also wins the Nighthawk.

criesFive Biggest Snubs:

  1. Liv Ullmann  (Cries and Whispers)
  2. Ingrid Thulin  (Cries and Whispers)
  3. Liv Ullmann  (Scenes from a Marriage)
  4. Liv Ullmann  (Autumn Sonata)
  5. Ruth Gordon  (Rosemary’s Baby)
  6. Sissy Spacek  (Badlands)

note:  For the second decade in a row, the top two snubs are from Bergman films.
note:  I’ve included six snubs since the Academy declared Scenes from a Marriage not eligible.

Top 5 Points for the Decade  (Actress only):

  1. Glenda Jackson  –  210
  2. Jane Fonda  –  210
  3. Ellen Burstyn  –  140
  4. Faye Dunaway  –  105
  5. Marsha Mason  –  105

note:  These five account for six of the Best Actress awards in the decade, though Mason did not win one.  The other four winners failed to earn another nomination in the decade.

Top 10 Points through 1979  (Actress only):

  1. Katharine Hepburn  –  490
  2. Bette Davis  –  420
  3. Ingrid Bergman  –  340
  4. Greer Garson  –  280
  5. Norma Shearer  –  245
  6. Elizabeth Taylor  –  245
  7. Jane Fonda  –  245
  8. Olivia de Havilland  –  240
  9. Susan Hayward  –  210
  10. Deborah Kerr  /  Audrey Hepburn  /  Glenda Jackson  –  210

Best Supporting Actor

 

deniroSupporting Actor continues to be a strong category (82.0 score) but is actually the weakest acting category in the decade.  Only one year falls below a 70 (1970 – 68.8) but only two go above a 90 (1972 – 97.3, 1975 – 93.3).

The winners, however, in this decade are pretty much solid choices.  Only one winner isn’t either the best or second best nominee (Joel Grey) and only three aren’t in my top two for the year, and all are third (Grey, John Mills, John Houseman).  Though, oddly, this is the only acting category to this point where I have never had back-to-back years of agreeing completely with the Academy.  The others have all had at least one three year streak.

Jason Robards is the dominant man of the decade, becoming the only person in either supporting category to ever win back-to-back Oscars.  Burgess Meredith also earns back-to-back nominations but loses both.  No winner, aside from Robards earns another nomination in the decade (though winner Robert De Niro does earn two lead nominations) while several people earn two nominations but don’t win (Meredith, Jeff Bridges, Robert Duvall, Jack Warden).

  • Best Year:  1972
  • Worst Year:  1970
  • Best Winner:  Robert De Niro  (The Godfather Part II)
  • Worst Winner:  John Houseman  (The Paper Chase)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Al Pacino  (The Godfather)
  • Worst Nominee:  John Marley  (Love Story)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  John Huston  (Chinatown)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  1.9
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.7
  • Score for the Decade:  82.0

john-huston-chinatownFive Biggest Snubs:

  1. John Huston  (Chinatown)
  2. Robert De Niro  (Mean Streets)
  3. Michael Caine  (California Suite)
  4. Tony Roberts  (Annie Hall)
  5. Ian Holm  (Alien)

Top Points of the Decade  (Supporting only):

  1. Jason Robards  –  120
  2. 8 actors at 60, one win each
  3. 4 actors at 60, two noms

Top 10 Points through 1979 (Supporting only):

  1. Walter Brennan  –  210
  2. Peter Ustinov  –  150
  3. Charles Coburn  –  120
  4. Claude Rains  –  120
  5. Anthony Quinn  –  120
  6. Arthur Kennedy  –  120
  7. Gig Young  –  120
  8. Jason Robards  –  120
  9. Melvyn Douglas  –  120
  10. 7 actors  –  90

Top 5 Points of the Decade (combined):

  1. Jack Nicholson  –  175
  2. Al Pacino  –  170
  3. Robert De Niro  –  130
  4. Jason Robards  –  120
  5. 5 actors  –  105

note:  Pacino has the fourth highest total for a decade to this point but doesn’t win the decade.  He joins Marlon Brando as the only actor to earn five Oscar nominations in a single decade, but he doesn’t win any of them.

Top 10 Points through 1979  (combined):

  1. Spencer Tracy  –  385
  2. Laurence Olivier  –  380
  3. Marlon Brando  –  315
  4. Jack Lemmon  –  270
  5. Fredric March  –  245
  6. Gary Cooper  –  245
  7. Richard Burton  –  240
  8. Walter Brennan  –  210
  9. Paul Muni  –  210
  10. James Stewart  /  Gregory Peck  –  210

Best Supporting Actress

 

streepLee Grant would be the big winner for the decade, the only actress with three Oscar nominations in supporting and a win to go along with it.  Only one other actress would even have a win and a nomination: Meryl Streep beginning her amazing Oscar career with a nomination in 78 and the win in 79 and then she wouldn’t be nominated in supporting again for the rest of the century.  The other three actresses who would at least earn multiple nominations would be Jane Alexander, Maureen Stapleton and Madeline Khan.
Only once in the decade would the winner not be in my Top 5 (1970) and she was my #6.  Four times the Academy got the pick completely right, including the last three.  The Oscar score is an impressive 86.7, higher than any acting category in any previous decade by four points, but lower than both Actor and Actress in this decade where they really started to do well with the acting picks.

  • Best Year:  1978
  • Worst Year:  1977
  • Best Winner:  Meryl Streep  (Kramer vs. Kramer)
  • Worst Winner:  Helen Hayes  (Airport)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Valentina Cortese  (Day for Night)
  • Worst Nominee:  Brenda Vacarro  (Once is Not Enough)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Harriett Andersson  (Cries and Whispers)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  2.3
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.8
  • Score for the Decade:  86.7

Note:  There were three years with perfect scores: 1974, 1976 and 1978.  So I chose the one with the best group of nominees.

cries-haSix Biggest Snubs:

  1. Harriett Andersson  (Cries and Whispers)
  2. Kari Sylwan  (Cries and Whispers)
  3. Shirley MacLaine  (Being There)
  4. Meryl Streep  (Manhattan)
  5. Bibi Andersson  (The Passion of Anna)
  6. Sissy Spacek  (Three Women)

note:  There are six because Streep was nominated (and won) that year for Kramer vs. Kramer and Academy rules wouldn’t have allowed her to be nominated again, so technically, it’s not a snub.  This is the straight decade where the biggest snub in this category is from a Bergman film.

Top Points in the Decade  (Supporting only):

  1. Lee Grant  –  120
  2. Meryl Streep  –  90

note:  Grant and Streep are the only actresses with more than 60 points on the decade just in supporting.  There are 11 actresses tied with 60 points – the other 8 Oscar winners, Maureen Stapleton, Madeline Kahn and Jane Alexander.

Top 10 Points through 1969  (Supporting only):

  1. Thelma Ritter  –  180
  2. Ethel Barrymore  –  150
  3. Shelley Winters  –  150
  4. Anne Revere  –  120
  5. Celeste Holm  –  120
  6. Claire Trevor  –  120
  7. Agnes Moorehead  –  120
  8. Lee Grant  –  120
  9. 16 actresses tied  –  90

note:  Ritter and Moorehead are the only actresses in the Top 8 without an Oscar.

Top 5 Points in the Decade  (combined):

  1. Jane Fonda  –  210
  2. Glenda Jackson  –  210
  3. Ellen Burstyn  –  170
  4. Lee Grant  –  120
  5. Faye Dunaway / Marsha Mason  –  105

Top 10 Points through 1979  (combined):

  1. Katharine Hepburn  –  490
  2. Bette Davis  –  420
  3. Ingrid Bergman  –  340
  4. Greer Garson  –  280
  5. Norma Shearer  –  245
  6. Elizabeth Taylor  –  245
  7. Jane Fonda  –  245
  8. Olivia de Havilland  –  240
  9. Susan Hayward  –  210
  10. Deborah Kerr  –  210
  11. Audrey Hepburn  –  210
  12. Glenda Jackson  –  210

note:  Kerr is the only actress in the Top 10 without an Oscar.  Garson and Shearer are the only actresses in the Top 8 without multiple Oscars.

Best Editing

This is the decade that really cements the relationship between Best Picture and Best Editing.  There was always a connection between the two, more than any other tech category.  Once the 5 BP Era began in 1944, most years there were at least three films with nominations in both categories, and every Best Editing winner from 1950 to 1965 was at least a BP nominee.  But in the 70’s, that’s gets increased.  Eight of the ten BP winners in the decade are nominated for Best Editing.  Every Best Editing winner in the decade is at least nominated for Best Picture.  Five films win both awards and two other Best Editing winners are the films in the year with the most Oscars (Cabaret and Star Wars).  There is a 58% overlap – 29 films earn nominations in both categories and in the last half of the decade there is at least 60% overlap in every year.  Yet, in an oddity, there are six films in this decade that earn Best Editing nominations but no other Oscar nominations – twice as many as in any other decade and as many as have happened from 1980 to 2014.

At the beginning of the decade, William H. Reynolds was in a 7-way tie for 7th place with 125 points.  He would earn a nomination for The Godfather (for which he should have won), which put him a 3-way tie for 6th place.  The next year he won his second Oscar for The Sting, which put him in a 6-way tie for 1st place.  Four years later he would earn a very undeserved nomination for The Turning Point, putting him by himself in 1st place with 225 points.  He would keep that position until 2005.

The nominees in this category get a lot, lot better, which is ironic, because the winners are slightly weaker.  Only three times do they give the Oscar to the best of the nominees.  Twice the winner doesn’t even make my Top 10.  But, four times this category sets a new high for score.  In the first 36 years of the category, the score never exceeded 64.9 and only reach 60 twice.  In the first six year of the decade there are scores of 65.4, 67.6, 68.3 and the incredible 97.1 in 1975.

  • Best Year:  1975
  • Worst Year:  1974
  • Best Winner:  Star Wars
  • Worst Winner:  The Towering Inferno
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  The Godfather
  • Worst Nominee:  Airport
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Cries and Whispers
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  6.6
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.4
  • Score for the Decade:  58.5

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Cries and Whispers
  2. The Godfather Part II
  3. Don’t Look Now
  4. Alien
  5. Annie Hall

Top 8 in Points for the Decade:

  1. William H. Reynolds  –  100
  2. Jerry Greenberg  –  100
  3. Harold F. Kress  –  75
  4. Verna Fields  –  75
  5. Marcia Lucas  –  75
  6. Richard Chew  –  75
  7. Peter Zinner  –  75
  8. Alan Heim  –  75

Top 10 in Points through 1979:

  1. William H. Reynolds  –  225
  2. Barbara McLean  –  200
  3. Daniel Mandell  –  200
  4. William Lyon  –  200
  5. Ralph E. Winters  –  200
  6. Harold F. Kress  –  200
  7. Ralph Dawson  –  175
  8. Frederic Knudtson  –  150
  9. 8 tied with  –  125

Best Cinematography

This is the decade of Gordon Willis.  Or, it’s not.  In my Top 40 list of the decade for Cinematography, Gordon Willis appears six times.  The only other cinematographer to appear more than twice is Vilmos Zsigmond and he earns an Oscar and another nomination in his three appearances.  Willis earned nothing, in spite of the fact that he did all of these films: Klute, The Godfather, The Godfather Part II, The Parallax View, All the President’s Men, Annie Hall, Interiors, Manhattan.

Because they weren’t recognizing Willis, the new group of young cinematographers still hadn’t really arrived.  The top two men on the decade, Robert Surtees and Fred Koenkamp, would not earn nominations again after this decade.  Of the seven cinematographers tied with 75 points in the decade, none would earn more than two nominations after this decade.  The one exception is Vittorio Storaro, who would be the top cinematographer at the Oscars in the eighties, wins his first Oscar for Apocalypse Now.  Conrad Hall, the big new discovery of the sixties, would earn only one nomination (The Day of the Locust).  Sven Nykvist, after being ignored for years for his brilliant work with Bergman, finally wins an Oscar for Cries and Whispers.

But the Academy still isn’t making particularly good choices and the score is mired at a rather pathetic 44.8.  That’s because, aside from ignoring Willis, they were constantly recognizing mediocrity.  Here are films that earned Oscar nominations instead of Willis: Nicholas and Alexandra, 1776, Earthquake, The Towering Inferno (which won), Logan’s Run, The Turning Point, Same Time Next Year, The Black Hole.  That is truly embarrassing.

  • Best Year:  1970
  • Worst Year:  1972
  • Best Winner:  Cries and Whispers
  • Worst Winner:  The Towering Inferno
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Chinatown
  • Worst Nominee:  Funny Lady
  • Most Egregious Snub:  The Godfather
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  4.1
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.6
  • Score for the Decade:  44.8

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. The Godfather
  2. Jaws
  3. Star Wars
  4. Alien
  5. The Godfather Part II

 

Top 3 in Points for the Decade:

  1. Robert Surtees  –  175
  2. Fred Koenekamp  –  100
  3. seven with 75

Top 10 in Points through 1979:

  1. Leon Shamroy  –  550
  2. Charles Lang  –  475
  3. Robert Surtees  –  475
  4. Harry Stradling  –  450
  5. Joseph Ruttenberg  –  350
  6. George Folsey  –  325
  7. James Wong Howe  –  300
  8. William V. Skall  –  275
  9. Ray Rennahan  –  250
  10. Arthur Miller   –  250
  11. Victor Milner  –  250
  12. Joseph LaShelle  –  250

Best Original Score / Original Dramatic Score / Original Song Score / Scoring: Adaptation and Original Song Score / Scoring: Original Song Score and/or Adaptation / Original Song Score and its Adaptation or Adaptation Score

Let John Williams begin.  Actually, he began in the late 60’s, with his first three nominations, two for Adapted and one for Score.  That left him with 45 points and all alone in 93rd place all-time.  He would enter the Top 10 list in 1977 and when the decade ended would be alone in 10th place.  He would be nominated every year from 1971 to 1975, the first five year streak since the Studio Era.  He is the only composer to be nominated five straight years since 1956 and he would do it three more times.  He would win an Oscar for Adaptation (Fiddler on the Roof) and earn another nomination.  He would win two Original Score Oscars (Jaws, Star Wars) and earn six other nominations.  He would even be nominated for Best Song.  Williams would be the top composer in points for not only this decade, but also the next three (and is, so far, #1 in the current decade).

The only other person even close to Williams is Jerry Goldsmith who would win an Oscar (The Omen) and earn six other nominations.  His streak of four straight nominations (73-76) is the only four year streak by anyone other than John Williams since 1956.  Perhaps what is most amazing is that, in spite of Goldsmith’s 17 nominations, he and Williams have only directly competed eight times, with Williams winning twice and neither winning the rest of the time.  Because of Williams occasionally being nominated for Adaptation and because of getting nominated in different years, 1985 and 1994 are the only years where neither is nominated from 1965 to 2002.

The Academy still couldn’t decide on names for these categories.  I also never really seem to know what to do with the latter category, so I mostly ignore it.  In 1975, the Academy would finally settle on Original Score for the main category and that would keep the name until the genre split in 1995.

The score for the category stays almost the same as in the previous decade.  There are only two years that are particularly weak (1973 and 1979) and several years that are strong, though, while 1972, 1974, 1976 and 1978 all score in the 70’s, no year breaks 80.  It will be the next decade where things really pick up.

 

 

Original Score / Original Dramatic Score

  • Best Year:  1978
  • Worst Year:  1979
  • Best Winner:  Star Wars
  • Worst Winner:  A Little Romance
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Superman
  • Worst Nominee:  The Champ
  • Most Egregious Snub:  1941
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  4.6
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.6
  • Score for the Decade:  59.3

note:  John Williams wins the Best Winner, Best Nominee That Didn’t Win and Most Egregious Snub.

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. 1941  (Williams)
  2. Aguirre, the Wrath of God  (Vuh)
  3. Rocky  (Conti)
  4. La Vallee  (Pink Floyd)
  5. Battles Without Honour and Humanity  (Tsushima)

note:  The Godfather would be here but it was originally nominated and then decided it didn’t qualify.  It would be #1.

 

Song Score / Adaptation

  • Best Year:  1979
  • Worst Year:  1974
  • Best Winner:  Let it Be
  • Worst Winner:  The Great Gatsby
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  The Muppet Movie
  • Worst Nominee:  Funny Lady
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  1.3
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.3
  • Score for the Decade:  100

note:  I’ll be honest here, this is a hard category to judge.  Let’s just say that any film I could think of that belonged here was nominated.

Top 5 in Points for the Decade:

  1. John Williams  –  280
  2. Jerry Goldsmith  –  200
  3. Georges Delerue  –  100
  4. Marvin Hamlisch  –  95
  5. Henry Mancini  –  60

Top 10 in Points through 1979:

  1. Alfred Newman  –  1245
  2. Max Steiner  –  700
  3. Morris Stoloff  –  525
  4. Victor Young  –  500
  5. Miklos Rozsa  –  475
  6. Ray Heindorf  –  430
  7. Dimitri Tiomkin  –  425
  8. Franz Waxman  –  350
  9. Johnny Green  –  340
  10. Herbert Stothart  –  300

Best Sound Recording

This had long been one of the worst Academy categories, but would suddenly get much better beginning with a huge leap in 1970.  This category had never scored higher than a 57.1 prior to this decade.  The average for this decade is higher than that and three different years (1970, 1974, 1978) score above an 80.  In the first 38 years of this category, only seven times had I given the Nighthawk to the Oscar winner and only one other Oscar winner was my #2.  In most years the Oscar winner didn’t make my Top 10.  In this decade, I agree with the Oscar winner 6 times and two others are my #2.  Fiddler on the Roof is the only winner to appear outside my Top 5.

Musicals were winding down as a genre, so they finally stopped dominating this category.  Two Musicals would win in this decade, one very undeservedly (Fiddler on the Roof over The French Connection) and one fairly deservedly, though I would have made a different choice (Cabaret over The Godfather).  But, after that, it would be another 30 years before a traditional Musical again would win in this category.

As I mentioned in the 60’s, the rules in this category changed late in that decade.  Prior to 1967, the nomination went to the head of the studio’s sound department.  That meant that, through that year, only 46 people had ever been nominated in this category.  There would be 76 different sound designers nominated in the 1970’s alone, lead by Robert Knudson, who would be the first designer to make it into the Top 10, starting with his Oscars for Cabaret and The Exorcist and continuing with five other nominations in the decade.  Also earning their first nominations in this decade would be two designers who would go eventually rise even higher on the list: Michael Minkler (one nomination – a rather undeserved one for The Electric Horseman) and Donald O. Mitchell (nominated undeservedly for The Paper Chase and more deservedly for Silver Streak)

  • Best Year:  1974
  • Worst Year:  1973
  • Best Winner:  Star Wars
  • Worst Winner:  Fiddler on the Roof
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  The French Connection
  • Worst Nominee:  Kotch
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Alien
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  3.1
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.6
  • Score for the Decade:  63.4

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Alien
  2. The Godfather Part II
  3. Serpico
  4. All That Jazz
  5. Solyaris

Top 5 in Points in the Decade:

  1. Robert Knudson  –  180
  2. Richard Portman  –  160
  3. Don MacDougall  –  120
  4. William McCaughey  –  120
  5. eight tied  –  100

Top 10 in Points through 1979:

  1. Douglas Shearer  –  380
  2. John Livadary  –  360
  3. Nathan Levinson  –  340
  4. Gordon Sawyer  –  320
  5. Thomas T. Moulton  –  280
  6. L. L. Ryder  –  240
  7. E. H. Hansen  –  220
  8. Fred Hynes  –  220
  9. George Groves  –  200
  10. Bernard B. Brown  –  180
  11. Robert Knudson  –  180

Best Art Direction

In 1970, Walter M. Scott would earn a nomination in this category for the 8th straight year.  It is remarkable because he was really the last of the old art designers.  After that year no one in the Top 10 would ever earn another nomination and no one would ever earn more than three consecutive nominations.  And yet, this wasn’t the future yet, either.  Of the 106 people to earn a nomination in this decade, only one, Norman Reynolds, would earn more than 80 points after this decade and he would only earn 100.

This is the only tech category which has a significant drop in score from the decade before.  The Academy recognized the best films – of the 13 films I have listed at the top for the decade, 7 of them won the Oscar and 2 more were nominated.  That just leaves four films that were ridiculously snubbed – the top four on my list below.  But of the next group of films on my list (27 films), none of the other three winners appear and only four nominees.  In fact my top 80 films in this category for the decade only account for 21 of the 50 nominees.  And it’s not a question of some years being better than others – the only year which doesn’t have at least five films on that list is 1978 and it has four (only one of which received a nomination).  The only year in the decade where all five of the nominees at least appeared on my list is 1972.  Every other year had at least one nominee I thought was a complete dud.

  • Best Year:  1979
  • Worst Year:  1970
  • Best Winner:  Star Wars
  • Worst Winner:  Patton
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Alien
  • Worst Nominee:  Airport ’77
  • Most Egregious Snub:  The Godfather
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  4.4
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.6
  • Score for the Decade:  59.9

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. The Godfather
  2. Cries and Whispers
  3. A Clockwork Orange
  4. Solyaris
  5. Young Frankenstein

Top 7 in Points in the Decade:

  1. George Gaines  –  100
  2. Gil Parrondo  –  100
  3. Richard Sylbert  –  80
  4. Vernan Dixon  –  80
  5. Dean Tavoularis  –  80
  6. Angelo Graham  –  80
  7. George R. Nelson  –  80

Top 10 in Points through 1979:

  1. Cedric Gibbons  –  1020
  2. Edwin B. Willis  –  800
  3. Lyle Wheeler  –  660
  4. Sam Comer  –  600
  5. Thomas Little  –  540
  6. Walter M. Scott  –  540
  7. Hans Dreier  –  520
  8. Richard Day  –  520
  9. Hal Pereira  –  480
  10. George Davis  –  380

Best Special Effects

Though there was only one year, 1973, where this award was not given at all, in four years it was a “Special Achievement” award, not a competitive one.  That makes a bit more difficult with the lists.

They really did fairly well with this category.  My top 7 films in this decade all won or were nominated and the ones that were merely nominated lost to better choices (Star Wars and Alien).  The biggest mistakes I think they made were in choosing not to give any award in 1973 when they could have rewarded The Exorcist and, after giving two special awards in 1976, choosing to make it competitive in 1977, thus costing Close Encounters an Oscar it deserved, even if Star Wars was the right choice.  That they would make it once again a competitive award, and then, in 1979, to give it a full slate of 5 nominees (for the only time between 1945 and 2010) says something about the rising quality of effects as well as the increase of films in genres that would required them.

A new breed of visual effects artists is still not arising.  Yes, there are a few people who dominate this decade (in three years, Glen Robinson wins four special Oscars while L.B. Abbott wins one competitive one and two special), but of all the artists to earn more than 40 points in this decade, only two, Carlo Rimbaldi (an Oscar in 1982) and John Dykstra (who, after a gap of 20 years, will earn two more noms and then win another Oscar) will ever earn even another nomination.  But there is one major name who emerges with his first Oscar: Richard Edlund, working with Dykstra on Star Wars, will be one of the two artists who will dominate this category in the 80’s.

  • Best Year:  1977
  • Worst Year:  1975
  • Best Winner:  Star Wars
  • Worst Winner:  The Hindenburg
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  • Worst Nominee:  Tora! Tora! Tora!
  • Most Egregious Snub:  The Exorcist
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  1.3
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.2
  • Score for the Decade:  93.0

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. The Exorcist
  2. The Golden Voyage of Sinbad
  3. Jaws
  4. Battlestar Gallactica
  5. Solyaris

Top 5 in Points in the Decade:

  1. Glen Robinson  –  160
  2. L.B. Abbott  –  120
  3. A.D. Flowers  –  100
  4. Albert Whitlock  –  80
  5. Carlo Rimbaldi  –  80

Top 5 in Points through 1979:

  1. A. Arnold Gillespie  –  300
  2. Gordon Jennings  –  220
  3. Fred Sersen  –  200
  4. Farciot Edouart  –  180
  5. L.B. Abbott  –  180

Best Sound Effects

This category had existed for a few years in the 60’s and then gone away.  It would be brought back four times in this decade, all for special Oscars.  If I were to tell you that the four awards were in 1975, 1977 (two) and 1979, you would probably think, “awesome, they gave it to Jaws, Star Wars, Close Encounters and Alien” and you would be wrong.  The two in the middle are right (Sound Effects for Star Wars, Sound Effects Editing for Close Encounters).  But, in 1975 The Hindenburg won a special achievement award for Sound Effects and in 1979 one for Sound Editing went to The Black Stallion.  Aside from missing out on Jaws and Alien, the most blatant omission is not giving a special award to The French Connection.  In terms of points, there is still no one with more than one award, though Benjamin Burtt, who won the award for Star Wars, would soon win another special award, in 1981, and then, the next year, will win the first competitive award and he is currently tied for first all-time in points.

  • Best Year:  1977
  • Worst Year:  1979
  • Best Winner:  Star Wars
  • Worst Winner:  The Black Stallion
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  n/a
  • Worst Nominee:  n/a
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Jaws
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  4.3
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  n/a
  • Score for the Decade:  65.7

Best Costume Design

Edith Head.  That’s it.  It’s still all about Edith Head.  She only earns four nominations this decade, with only one win.  She used to earn 75 points in just two years.  But the old guard is fading away.  Of the 10 designers with the most career points through 1969, only half of them will even earn a nomination this decade, only Head will win one and only Dorothy Jeakins will earn one after this decade.  A couple of younger designers who will end up in the Top 10 eventually start to make their names in this decade, with two Oscars going to Anthony Powell (one of which, Death on the Nile, is the weakest choice of the decade) and one to Milana Canonero (hers, Barry Lyndon, is the best choice of the decade).

With the Black-and-White category not around to bring down the score anymore, the category is solid in this decade, peaking in the mid-70’s (back-to-back scores in the 90s in 73 and 74) but falling at the end of the decade (back-to-back scores under 50 in 77 and 78).  The winners are solid (every winner makes my Top 5 of its year) but not outstanding (only two win the Nighthawk).  The most bizarre omission in the decade is Cabaret, not only because the costumes were great, but because it earned 10 nominations and won 8 Oscars but was passed over for The Poseidon Adventure.  Kudos to the Academy for rewarding Star Wars in a category they might have thought to overlook it.

  • Best Year:  1974
  • Worst Year:  1977
  • Best Winner:  Barry Lyndon
  • Worst Winner:  Death on the Nile
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Chinatown
  • Worst Nominee:  The Swarm  *
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Cabaret
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  2.9
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.6
  • Score for the Decade:  68.5

note:  The Swarm is the worst of several bad choices that also include both Airport and Airport ’77.

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Cabaret
  2. McCabe & Mrs. Miller
  3. The Chess Players
  4. Women in Love
  5. The Three Musketeers

Top 4 Points in the Decade:

  1. Edith Head  – 75
  2. Anthony Powell  –  60
  3. Yvonne Blake  –  45
  4. Piero Tosi  –  45

note:  There are 17 designers with 30 points, meaning they either won an Oscar with no other nominations or received two nominations without a win.  Head’s win is with a third of the points with which she won in the previous decade, partially because she’s doing much less work and partially because there’s only one category now.  Yet, it’s still a solid number.  Only two designers have surpassed 75 points in a single decade since – Colleen Atwood and Sandy Powell in the 00’s, although Atwood is on pace to do it again this decade.

Top 10 Points through 1979:

  1. Edith Head  –  645
  2. Irene Sharaff  –  300
  3. Charles LeMaire  –  285
  4. Jean Louis  –  225
  5. Dorothy Jeakins  –  210
  6. Helen Rose  –  180
  7. Walter Plunkett  –  165
  8. Bill Thomas  –  165
  9. Gile Steele  –  120
  10. Mary Wills  –  120

note:  This list will remain unchanged until 1991.  Jeakins is the only person on the list who will earn any more nominations (she’ll earn one, so she won’t move spots).  In 1991, Anthony Powell will get to 120 and become the 11th person on the list.  No one will be knocked from this list until 2001, when Powell and Milena Canonero will both get up to 135 and knock Steele and Wills from the list.

Best Song

What does it say about this decade when the best of the 10 winners is a Carpenters song?  Or that, aside from my list of Egregious Snubs, my entire list of Top 5 Semi-Finalists That Weren’t Nominated were all better than any of the 10 winners during the decade?  They had a notion of what might be a great song, but then they blew it in the end.

This category continues to struggle in this decade, and yet, there signs of hope.  They gave an Oscar to Isaac Hayes.  Paul McCartney would earn a nomination with the Wings.  But we also had Oscars for songs like “The Morning After”, “You Light Up My Life” and “It Goes Like It Goes”, not to mention “Last Dance”.

This category suffered in the previous two decades because Disney was ignored.  Here, two Disney songs are nominated, but they aren’t very good, and by far the best Disney song of the decade (“Oo-de-lally”) wasn’t nominated, while the second best, “Everybody Wants to Be a Cat” was long-listed but not nominated.  They almost fixed that with The Muppet Movie, long-listing four songs, but they only nominated one and then they passed it over for the Oscar in favor of the song from Norma Rae.

Rock and roll was still an issue.  The Beatles were eligible for their songs from Let it Be (see note below); they failed to earn any nominations, though, ironically, won the Oscar for Song Score.  The Rolling Stones were eligible for songs from Gimme Shelter and again, no nominations.  Bob Dylan, Jimmy Cliff, Cat Stevens and The Ramones would all do original songs for nought.  Not even the songs from The Rose could earn nominations.  But at least two James Bond theme songs were nominated for the first time.

So, if rock and roll was being ignored, what was being nominated?  Well, the light touch of the songwriting team of Alan and Marilyn Bergman was.  They had earned back-to-back nominations coming into the decade and then earned four more, for the second longest streak in the category’s history.  They would also earn back-to-back nominations to close out the decade.  Other favorites would include Sammy Fain, earning his last three nominations and Henry Mancini, earning four.  But the most frustrating were the nominations for Sammy Cahn and Paul Francis Webster, two of the biggest songwriters in the category’s history.  They would each earn their final nominations in this category in 1975 and 1976, respectively.  Both are for films that were almost not even seen and are almost impossible to find today.  But the songwriters loved those two, and so they earned nominations.

* – A quick footnote on the Beatles and Stones.  I don’t count documentaries for the Nighthawk Awards.  Thus, neither the Beatles or Stones appear on the Most Egregious Snubs list.  However, since “Let It Be” was a semi-finalist, I do include it on the list of best Semi-Finalists that weren’t nominated list.  Since the songs were eligible, the scores for their years do reflect the Academy’s failure to nominate the songs.

 

  • Best Year:  1976
  • Worst Year:  1972
  • Best Winner:  “For All We Know” from Lovers and Other Strangers
  • Worst Winner:  “Last Dance” from Thank God It’s Friday
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  “The Rainbow Connection” from The Muppet Movie
  • Worst Nominee:  “Pieces of Dreams” from Pieces of Dreams
  • Most Egregious Snub:  “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” from Monty Python’s The Life of Brian
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  6.2
  • Average Winner Rank among nominees:  2.0
  • Score for the Decade:  41.9

note:  In the previous two decades, the Best Nominee That Didn’t Win was the only nominated Disney song during the decade.  This time it’s a Muppets song (who are, coincidentally, now owned by Disney).  What is it with the Academy’s refusal to give the Oscar to a great song from a Kids film?

 

5 Most Egregious Snubs:

  1. “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” from Monty Python’s The Life of Brian
  2. “Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door” from Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid
  3. “Suicide is Painless” from M*A*S*H
  4. “The Rose” from The Rose
  5. “Movin’ Right Along” from The Muppet Movie

5 Best Semi-Finalists That Weren’t Nominated:

  1. “Let it Be” from Let it Be
  2. “Suicide is Painless” from M*A*S*H
  3. “Movin’ Right Along” from The Muppet Movie
  4. “I Got a Name” from The Last American Hero
  5. “New York, New York” from New York, New York

Nominations I Haven’t Seen:

  • “Come Follow, Follow Me” from Little Ark  (1972)
  • “Now That We’re in Love” from Whiffs  (1975)
  • “A World That Never Was” from Half a House  (1976)

Top 5 in Points in the Decade:

  1. Marilyn Bergman  –  70
  2. Alan Bergman  –  70
  3. Marvin Hamlisch  –  60
  4. Joel Hirschhorn  –  50
  5. Al Kasha  –  50

Top 10 in Points through 1979:

  1. Sammy Cahn  –  300
  2. Johnny Mercer  –  220
  3. Paul Francis Webster  –  190
  4. James Van Heusen  –  180
  5. Harry Warren  –  140
  6. Ned Washington  –  130
  7. Sammy Fain  –  120
  8. Henry Mancini  –  120
  9. Leo Robin  –  110
  10. Jule Styne  –  110

Best Foreign Film

The films aren’t quite as good this decade, which makes the Academy’s job a little tougher, I suppose.  From 69 films that make my cut-off (**** or ***.5) in the 60’s, there are only 46 this decade.  Only 5 of those are submitted but fail to earn a nomination, two of them in 1977.  But 8 of the 10 winners are on the list and another 10 nominees.  Of my Top 10 Foreign Films of the decade, four would win the Oscar while the other six wouldn’t be submitted, so that’s more about the Academy’s rules than their choices.

Five countries submitted a film every year.  France is the only repeat country from the 60’s and it’s joined by Spain, Poland, West Germany and Hungary.  All of them would be nominated at least twice, with France getting nominated an astounding 8 times.  Italy would also earn 8 nominations, in only 9 submissions.  The only other country nominated at least half the times it submitted is Israel (4 noms in 7 submissions), while the USSR came close (4 noms in 9 submissions).  Spain and Poland also earned 4 noms while no other country earned more than 2.  Ivory Coast was the Algeria of this decade, winning the Oscar with its only submission.  The only other countries to even earn nominations while submitting less than 5 times were East Germany (1 nom, 3 sub) and Greece (1 nom, 2 sub).  The unluckiest countries in the decade would be Brazil and Denmark, both of whom submit 9 times and fail to earn any nominations.

Italy would fail to submit a film for the first time in 1973.  But it would follow that up with a record six straight nominations.  Italy and France would rule the decade – one of the two countries would win each of the first five years and at least one of the two countries would be nominated every year.  The only two years where Italy isn’t nominated France would win.  Italy would win in back-to-back years in 70 and 71, France in 72 and 73, then France again in 77 and 78.  Since then, only once has a country won back-to-back awards (Denmark in 87-88).  Israel would earn three straight nominations (71-73), then only two from 1974 to 2006, then follow it up with another three straight (07-09).  Poland would earn three straight nominations (74-76) and then take 31 years to earn its next three.  This decade would have the only time in the history of the award when Italy failed to submit a film (1973) and the only time that Japan failed to submit a film (1976).  Japan would not win the award in the decade and only earn two nominations, but Akira Kurosawa would win the award in 1975 for a film submitted by the USSR.

Two directors who won Oscars while it was still a special award win their first competitive award (Kurosawa and Vittorio de Sica – it would be de Sica’s third win).  Fellini wins his fourth Oscar.  Two directors would win an award and earn two other nominations in the decade: Luis Buñuel and Moshé Mizrahi, with Mizrahi earning his two nominations for Israel and winning an Oscar for France.

This time, with 65% of the submissions coming from Europe, 82% of the nominations come from Europe.  But Western Europe, which accounts for slightly less than a third of the submissions has slightly more than half the nominations (and 8 of the 10 wins).  The statistics are below.

  • Best Year:  1973
  • Worst Year:  1979
  • Best Winner:  Day for Night
  • Worst Winner:  The Tin Drum
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  That Obscure Object of Desire
  • Worst Nominee:  First Love
  • Most Egregious Snub:  The Ascent
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  6.9  *
  • Average Winner Rank among nominees:  1.9
  • Score for the Decade:  81.5  *

*  –  The Score for the Decade and Winner Rank at Nighthawks are based only on submitted films.  Though I think the Academy’s rules are stupid, I can only grade them on what was allowed within the rules.  So, in 1978, the grade does not reflect the absence of Autumn Sonata which was not submitted but it does reflect the absence of The Chess Players which was submitted but not nominated.  Full lists of what was submitted can be found here.

5 Most Egregious Snubs:

  1. The Ascent
  2. The Mystery of Kaspar Hauser
  3. The Chess Players
  4. Soldier of Orange
  5. Under the Flag of the Rising Sun

note:  Only one film on this list is a **** film, which means the Academy does better this decade.

5 Best Films not submitted:

  1. Cries and Whispers
  2. Scenes from a Marriage
  3. Aguirre, the Wrath of God
  4. King Lear
  5. Solyaris

5 Worst Submissions (in relation between the film not submitted and the film submitted):

explanation:  On a 100 point scale, the biggest difference between the film that was submitted and what I thought was the best film from that country.  It only works if I have seen the submitted film.  For the list above, blame goes on the Academy’s system.  For this list, the blame goes on the submitting country.  There are 27 times in this decade where a country submitted a film, I’ve seen that film, and I think a different film should have been submitted.  In 14 of those times, the point difference is less than 10. There are another 6 times where it is between 10 and 19.  There are two more times where it is 22.  These last five are the most egregious.

  1. 1971 USSR  –  Tchaikovsky submitted instead of King Lear  (41 pts)
  2. 1979 West Germany  –  The Tin Drum submitted instead of Nosferatu the Vampyre  (40 pts)
  3. 1973 West Germany  –  The Pedestrian submitted instead of Aguirre, the Wrath of God  (32 pts)
  4. 1972 Sweden  –  The New Land submitted instead of Cries and Whispers  (28 pts)
  5. 1971 France  –  Ramparts of Clay submitted instead of Murmur of the Heart  (26 pts)

note:  Three of these submitted films were nominated (The New Land, The Pedestrian, Tchaikovsky), but worse, The Tin Drum won the Oscar.  The New Land is the most acceptable of these – it’s actually a pretty good film, it’s just that Cries and Whispers is one of the greatest films of all-time.  West Germany has the worst track record, appearing on the list 5 times, four of them in double-digits – all four of those involved Werner Herzog being passed over.  Italy was the best – submitting 9 times, with 8 nominations, only twice did they do badly and neither was more than 10 points in difference.

Nominations I Haven’t Seen:

  • Hoa-Binh  (1970)
  • Paix sur les champs  (1970)
  • The Hungarians  (1978)

Top 5 Countries in Points during the Decade:

  1. France –  240
  2. Italy  –  220
  3. USSR  –  100
  4. Israel  –  80
  5. Spain  /  Poland  /  West Germany  –  80

Top 5 Countries in Points through 1979 (not including Special Awards):

  1. France  –  560
  2. Italy  –  520
  3. USSR  –  200
  4. Japan  –  180
  5. Sweden / Spain  –  180

Top 5 Countries in Points through 1979  (including Special Awards):

  1. France  –  680
  2. Italy  –  600
  3. Japan  –  300
  4. USSR  –  200
  5. Sweden / Spain  –  180

Submission Statistics:

  • Western Europe: 70 submissions, 26 nominees, 8 winners
  • Eastern Europe:  38 submissions, 11 nominees, 1 winner
  • Scandinavia:  16 submissions, 3 nominees
  • Balkans:  17 submissions, 1 nominee
  • Europe (total):  141 submissions, 41 nominees, 9 winners
  • Middle East:  11 submissions, 4 nominees  (all Israel)
  • Asia, incl. ME:  33 submissions, 6 nominees (all Israel or Japan)
  • South America:  16 submissions, 1 nominee (Argentina)
  • North America:  13 submissions, 1 nominee (Mexico)
  • Africa:  11 submissions, 1 nominee, 1 winner (Ivory Coast)

Other Categories

 

The following categories didn’t yet exist by 1979: Makeup, Animated Film.

Best Makeup had existed as a special award twice in the 60’s but then would disappear until it was made a permanent competitive award in 1981.  There are three films that are definitely robbed (in my opinion) of an Oscar because of this: The Exorcist, Star Wars and Alien, while Barry Lyndon also deserved one.  All That Jazz is trickier, as my fifth best of the decade because it’s in the same year as Alien.  Those are the only films I’ll raise a fuss over, although I am able to fill all five slots in most of the years of the decade.

Best Animated Film would take until this century to become a category.  The big change in this decade is that while I again only have three winners in my own category, for the first time since 1947 a studio other than Disney wins an award.  That’s in 1978 when AVCO Embassy takes it home thanks to Watership Down.  The other two times I give the award are in 1970 (The Aristocats) and 1977 (The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh).  It’s not a good decade for animated films.  Disney starts to fall off in quality: Robin Hood and The Rescuers become the first Disney films not to earn at least ***.5 since the 40’s.  The good news is that Disney is no longer the only kid on the block.  Of the 38 Animated films in the decade only 5 of them were from Disney.  This decade sees a new Hanna-Barbera film (Charlotte’s Web), the first Looney Tunes film (Bugs Bunny Superstar) and the first three Peanuts films.  The problem is that none of them are any better than ***.  The real explosion in quality animated films will have to wait another decade.

By Year

1970

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1970
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  # 75
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  3.00
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  3.00
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.67
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  71.1
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  77.6
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  62.7
  • Total Nominee Score:  66.8

1971

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1971
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  39
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  4.44
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  4.59
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.72
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  77.9
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  89.6
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  51.8
  • Total Nominee Score:  68.7

1972

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1972
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  23
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  2.56
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  2.65
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.94
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  71.2
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  95.9 (highest to date)
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  63.6
  • Total Nominee Score:  72.6

1973

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1973
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  7 (best prior to 1994)
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  3.88
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  3.81
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  2.29
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  83.9 (highest to date)
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  80.0
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  58.4
  • Total Nominee Score:  70.8

1974

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1974
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  19
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  4.56
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  4.71
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  2.35
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  79.9
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  88.1
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  63.6
  • Total Nominee Score:  74.5

1975

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1975
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  24
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  1.79 (best to date)
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  1.72 (best to date)
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.41
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  77.8
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  89.8
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  67.1 (highest to date)
  • Total Nominee Score:  74.7 (highest to date)

1976

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1976
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  15
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  3.67
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  3.06
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  2.00
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  74.8
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  93.8
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  60.8
  • Total Nominee Score:  74.7

1977

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1977
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  40
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  2.63
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  2.67
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.72
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  63.8
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  80.3
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  54.4
  • Total Nominee Score:  62.8

1978

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1978
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  47
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  3.44
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  3.59
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.82
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  75.7
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  93.6
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  64.0
  • Total Nominee Score:  73.3

1979

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1979
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  21
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  6.21
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  6.17
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  2.06
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  70.4
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  85.9
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  59.8
  • Total Nominee Score:  66.8
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