That's the look of a man who has just realized he's gonna need a bigger boat.

That’s the look of a man who has just realized he’s gonna need a bigger boat.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category (or Globe, in the Globes section).  Films in blue were nominated.  Films with an asterisk (*) were Consensus nominees (a scale I put together based on the various awards) while those with a double asterisk (**) were the Consensus winners.

I’m listing the top 10 in the categories but only the top 5 earn Nighthawk nominations.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. Jaws  *
  2. Dog Day Afternoon  *
  3. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest  **
  4. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
  5. The Man Who Would Be King
  6. Amarcord
  7. Barry Lyndon  *
  8. Shampoo
  9. Three Days of the Condor
  10. The Sunshine Boys

Analysis:  This is the first time since 1964 where the five Consensus nominees were also the five Oscar nominees and the same film was the winner in both.
This is a nice range for a Top 5 – a Horror, Crime, Drama, Comedy and Adventure.  The whole Top 10 is ****, but there are no other **** films.  Barry Lyndon is a film I didn’t think that highly of originally, but have to come to admire more the more I watch it, though I can’t imagine it would ever climb high enough to make the Top 5.  I re-watched Three Days of the Condor before doing these awards and it moved up a few spots.  Ironically, my under-appreciated film for this year in my original Year in Film is moved to 1977 now that oscars.org exists for me to check.

  • jaws-spielbergBest Director
  1. Steven Spielberg  (Jaws)  *
  2. Sidney Lumet  (Dog Day Afternoon)  *
  3. Stanley Kubrick  (Barry Lyndon)  *
  4. Milos Forman  (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)  **
  5. John Huston  (The Man Who Would Be King)
  6. Federico Fellini  (Amarcord)
  7. Sydney Pollack  (Three Days of the Condor)
  8. Luis Buñuel  (The Phantom of Liberty)
  9. John Frankenheimer  (The French Connection 2)
  10. Hal Ashby  (Shampoo)

Analysis:  These are the first nominations for Spielberg and Forman.  It’s the first of several wins for Spielberg.  It’s the third nomination for Lumet, the sixth for Huston and the seventh for Kubrick.  Kubrick is up to 450 points and in a four way tie for 4th place.
Forman just barely wins the Consensus over Robert Altman for Nashville (who is my #12).  Kubrick is a very close 3rd.  Even Lumet is a not-to distant fourth.  Lumet does this by beginning a trend – prior to this year only three times had a director been nominated (but not won) the Oscar, DGA, BAFTA and Globe.  But, after he does it this year, it becomes fairly common.
At the Oscars, of course, they passed over Spielberg for Fellini, much to his embarrassment, as there was a documentary crew watching his reaction to the nomination announcements.  It was idiotic, of course, since Jaws is so much a director’s film.  They would do the same to Scorsese the next year.

  • Best Adapted Screenplay:
  1. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
  2. One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest  **
  3. The Man Who Would Be King  *
  4. Barry Lyndon  *
  5. Three Days of the Condor
  6. Jaws  *
  7. The Sunshine Boys  *
  8. The Story of Adele H  *
  9. The Day of the Locust
  10. The French Connection 2

Analysis:  A strange thing happened in this year in both writing categories that had never happened before and has only rarely happened since (and never again in both categories in the same year).  A screenplay was nominated at the WGA, the Globes and the BAFTAs but not the Oscars.  And in both cases this year, I side with the Oscars.  In Adapted, it’s Jaws, which has some good parts, but I knock out because of Holy Grail, which technically is adapted.  The fifth Oscar nominee, by the way, was the original Italian Scent of a Woman, which isn’t on my list at all.
John Huston finally earns a sixth writing nomination, 24 years after his fifth.  Kubrick, meanwhile, is earning his 7th nomination, all since Huston’s previous one.
This is a category where I had Cuckoo as my winner for a long time.  But, Holy Grail really does qualify as adapted and as the funniest film ever made, I really feel the script is the major reason for its success.
I have read four of the original sources – the first four.  This is the best Top 5 in four years.

  • Best Original Screenplay:
  1. Dog Day Afternoon  **
  2. Amarcord  *
  3. Shampoo  *
  4. Love and Death
  5. And Now My Love  *
  6. L’Invitation
  7. The Phantom of Liberty
  8. Lies My Father Told Me  *
  9. A Brief Vacation
  10. Lacombe, Lucien

Analysis:  In Original, the script mentioned above is Nashville, a script I don’t think much of (I think the writing is the weakest part of the film).
Fourteen years after his last nomination, Fellini earns his fifth.  Woody Allen is also earning his fifth, all since Fellini’s fourth.
This list does not reflect well on American film.  There are seven Foreign films on my list, three of which earned Oscar nominations.  As is often the case, when one writing category is better, the other one drops off – this is the weakest Top 5 in three years.  With all five Oscar nominees in my Top 8, it earns a score of 89.3, the highest in this category since 1959.

  • Best Actor:
  1. Jack Nicholson (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)  **
  2. Al Pacino  (Dog Day Afternoon)  *
  3. Walter Matthau  (The Sunshine Boys)  *
  4. Warren Beatty  (Shampoo)
  5. Michael Caine  (The Man Who Would Be King)
  6. Gene Hackman  (Night Moves)  *
  7. Georgi Taratorkin  (Crime and Punishment)
  8. Robert Redford  (Three Days of the Condor)
  9. Sean Connery  (The Man Who Would Be King)
  10. Maxmillian Schell  (The Man in the Glass Booth)  *

Analysis:  In 1974, Nicholson won the BAFTA, Globe, NYFC and NSFC (and the Nighthawk) but somehow lost the Oscar.  This year he wins those same four (and the Nighthawk) and adds the NBR, and of course, the Oscar.  It’s a new Consensus points high and won’t be beaten until 1980.  It’s not a clean sweep though, because this is the first year of the LAFC and they give their award to Pacino (who also wins the BAFTA because of different eligibility years).
It’s the second nomination for Matthau.  It’s the third each for Caine and Beatty.  It’s the fourth straight for Pacino and his third straight second place finish.  It’s Nicholson’s fifth nomination, his third straight, his third win, and his second win in a row.  He’s up to 275 points and 11th place.
In spite of Nicholson and Pacino, this Top 5 is a big drop from the previous two years.  Pacino’s performance is so good it probably makes my Top 5 for the decade, but can’t even win in this year.

  • Best Actress
  1. Isabelle Adjani  (The Story of Adele H)  **
  2. Louise Fletcher  (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)  *
  3. Carol Kane  (Hester Street)
  4. Glenda Jackson  (Hedda)  *
  5. Florinda Bolkan  (A Brief Vacation)  *
  6. Ann-Margret  (Tommy)  *
  7. Julie Christie  (Shampoo)
  8. Diane Keaton  (Love and Death)
  9. Barbra Streisand  (Funny Lady)

Analysis:  When I am typing these posts up, I fill in the names for Director and all the acting categories, with parenthesis.  Then I start doing the titles and popping them in where they belong – that way I can italicize a title like Shampoo once instead of six times.  But I noticed, when doing Actress, that most of this list (7 of the 9) aren’t listed in Director or any of the other acting categories.  That’s a lot of isolation.  And it wasn’t just me.  Hester Street, Hedda and Tommy The Story of Adele H all earn only the single Oscar nomination.  It’s the only time between 1964 and 1990 that three films earn a Best Actress nomination and no other nominations.  In fact, the only time this happened with any acting category since the nominees were settled with five in 1936 is in 1964 (Actress), 1971 (Supporting Actress), 1975 (Actress), 1987 (Supporting Actress), 1990 (Actress), 1994 (Actress), 2003 (Actress) and 2006 (Actor).

These are the only nominations for Fletcher, Kane and Bolkan.  It’s the first nomination for Adjani.  It’s the third nomination for Jackson.
In spite of not winning the Oscar or even receiving a Globe nom, Adjani has the highest Consensus total in four years by winning the NYFC, NSFC and NBR.
For a long time, I had Fletcher as my winner.  But I re-watched The Story of Adele H before working on these awards and ended up moving Adjani up.  That’s not anything against Fletcher, who is brilliant.  But I have to go the nod to Adjani.  This Top 5 is another significant drop from the two previous years.
With all five Oscar nominees in my Top 6, this category earns a score of 96.6, the third best to-date.

  • shampooBest Supporting Actor:
  1. Jack Warden  (Shampoo)
  2. George Burns  (The Sunshine Boys)  *
  3. Brad Dourif  (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)  **
  4. John Cazale  (Dog Day Afternoon)
  5. Charles Durning  (Dog Day Afternoon)  *
  6. Burgess Meredith  (The Day of the Locust)  *
  7. Richard Benjamin  (The Sunshine Boys)
  8. Henry Gibson  (Nashville)  *
  9. Chris Sarandon  (Dog Day Afternoon)
  10. Leon Vatali  (Barry Lyndon)

Analysis:  This year has an incredibly small range in the Consensus nominees.  There is the smallest range between the #1 and #5 on the Consensus list, not just to-date, but of any year.  Dourif wins (BAFTA win, Oscar nom), followed by Burns (Oscar win, Globe nom for lead), Meredith (Oscar, BAFTA, Globe noms), Gibson (NSFC win, Globe nom) and Durning (NBR win, Globe nom).  That leaves my winner, Warden, with his Oscar and Globe noms in 6th place.  Nobody won more than one award (and there are two other winners – Alan Arkin, my #11 in Hearts of the West, won the NYFC and Richard Benjamin actually won the Globe) and only Meredith earned more than two nominations (and he didn’t win any).
This is actually the only nomination for all five of these actors.
This is, again, not a great Top 5.  Burns is the weakest #2 in this category since 1965.

  • Shampoo_Lee Grant_1975Best Supporting Actress:
  1. Lee Grant  (Shampoo)  *
  2. Lily Tomlin  (Nashville)  **
  3. Ronee Blakely  (Nashville)  *
  4. Karen Black  (The Day of the Locust)
  5. Marisa Berenson  (Barry Lyndon)
  6. Faye Dunaway  (Three Days of the Condor)
  7. Sylvia Miles  (Farewell My Lovely)  *
  8. Goldie Hawn  (Shampoo)

Analysis:  These are the only nominations for Berensen, Blakely and Tomlin.  It’s the second nomination for Black.  It’s also the second nomination for Grant, 24 years after her first one.
Overall, the four acting categories are the weakest they’ve been in five years and they won’t be this weak again for a long time, if ever.

  • Best Editing:
  1. Jaws
  2. Dog Day Afternoon
  3. The Man Who Would Be King
  4. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
  5. Three Days of the Condor
  6. Barry Lyndon
  7. The Phantom of Liberty
  8. One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest
  9. And Now My Love
  10. Shampoo

Analysis:  In this first 41 years of this category at the Oscars, the highest score it earned was a 68.3 and only four time did it exceed 60.  With all five nominees in my Top 8, the score is a 97.1.  It is the first time that they really do a great job in this category and it will be over a decade before it even breaks 80 again.

  • Best Cinematography:
  1. Barry Lyndon  **
  2. Jaws
  3. The Man Who Would Be King  *
  4. Dog Day Afternoon
  5. Three Days of the Condor
  6. Amarcord
  7. One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest  *
  8. The French Connection 2
  9. Shampoo
  10. The Great Waldo Pepper

Analysis:  The Oscars nominated Funny Lady over Jaws.  I am not making that up.  I wish I could give my award to Jaws, but I can’t deny the brilliance of the work in Barry Lyndon.  It is the first film to sweep the existing awards in this category (Oscar, BAFTA, LAFC, NSFC) – by the time another film wins four awards (1980) there will be more critics groups, so there won’t be a sweep again until 1984.  Because of more and more awards groups, no film will ever again have as high a percentage of the Consensus points as Barry Lyndon does (52.70%).
The Oscars got the winner right but they sure screwed up the rest of it.  The score is a 36.1, the first of three straight terrible years.

  • Best Original Score:
  1. Jaws
  2. Amarcord
  3. The Man Who Would Be King
  4. Shampoo
  5. One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest
  6. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
  7. The Wind and the Lion
  8. Stavisky
  9. Hunchback of the Morgue
  10. Bite the Bullet

Analysis:  Nino Rota, working with Fellini still, earns his 7th nomination – he’s at 200 points and tied for 6th.  Maurice Jarre, with his score for The Man Who Would Be King, earns his 7th nomination, but with his four wins, he’s at 275 points and is in 4th place.  John Williams is still far behind that, but he earns his first of many, many wins.  The score for Shampoo is actually by Paul Simon.

  • Best Sound:
  1. Jaws
  2. The Man Who Would Be King
  3. Barry Lyndon
  4. Dog Day Afternoon
  5. The French Connection 2
  6. The Great Waldo Pepper
  7. Three Days of the Condor
  8. One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest
  9. The Hindenburg
  10. The Wind and the Lion

Analysis:  The year after the Oscars sets a new high in this category for score, it plummets down to 48.4, but this is just a blip in what is a mostly upwards trajectory at this point.

  • barryBest Art Direction:
  1. Barry Lyndon
  2. The Man Who Would Be King
  3. Amarcord
  4. Shampoo
  5. One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest
  6. The Phantom of Liberty
  7. The Story of Adele H
  8. The Sunshine Boys
  9. Dog Day Afternoon
  10. The Day of the Locust

Analysis:  The Oscar score is a 79.4, the highest in eight years.  The fifth Oscar nominee was The Hindenburg which was not a particularly good choice.

  • Best Visual Effects
  1. Jaws
  2. The Hindenburg
  3. The Great Waldo Pepper

Analysis:  I really don’t know why the Academy thought that The Hindenburg was worthy of these two awards but not Jaws.

  • Best Sound Editing
  1. Jaws
  2. The French Connection 2
  3. The Man Who Would Be King
  4. The Hindenburg
  5. The Great Waldo Pepper

Analysis:  A very slight drop from the year before, but still one of the best Top 5 to date.

  • barry-lyndon-drunk-parlor-hi-resBest Costume Design:
  1. Barry Lyndon
  2. The Man Who Would Be King
  3. The Story of Adele H
  4. Amarcord
  5. The Four Musketeers
  6. Love and Death
  7. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
  8. The Phantom of Liberty
  9. The Magic Flute
  10. The Day of the Locust

Analysis:  The Academy earns a score of 87.9, a drop from the two previous years but still an excellent score.  This is one of the easiest winners to pick in the history of this category.

  • Best Makeup
  1. Barry Lyndon
  2. The Man Who Would Be King
  3. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
  4. The Rocky Horror Picture Show
  5. Jaws
  6. A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Analysis:  The best Top 5 in seven years and tied for the second best Top 5 to-date, but part of that is just having a full five.  The Man Who Would Be King would be a winner in most years prior to this one.

  • Best Original Song:
  1. “I’m Easy”  (Nashville)
  2. “Do You Know Where I’m Going To”  (Mahogany)
  3. “200 Years”  (Nashville)
  4. “Knights of the Round Table”  (Monty Python and the Holy Grail)

Analysis:  The semi-finalists are in orange.  Again, there are none this year.
These four are better than the year before and better than the following year, but still aren’t all that great.  But at least the Academy got the winner right.  It was a pretty easy choice (no pun intended).

  • Best Animated Film:
  1. none

Analysis:  The lack of a winner is not for the lack of trying.  There are seven films in this year, six of which are eligible, and that’s the most in a single year to this date.  There is also one eligible film that is not of feature length and which I haven’t seen (Emilio and His Magical Bull).  The best film is Bugs Bunny Superstar, the first of the clip movies from Warner Bros, but it’s still only a high ***, which isn’t good enough to make my list.  It’s followed, in descending order of quality, by Betty Boop Scandals (another clip movie), Gulliver’s Travels Beyond the Moon, Dick Deadeye (Bill Melendez making a non-Peanuts film), Journey Back to Oz, Aladdin and His Magic Lamp (the non-eligible film) and Coonskin, yet another terrible Ralph Bakshi film.

  • kasparBest Foreign Film:
  1. The Mystery of Kaspar Hauser
  2. The Story of Adele H  *
  3. The Mirror
  4. Dersu Uzala  *

note:  Films in green were submitted to the Academy but not nominated.

Analysis:  It’s the third straight nomination for West Germany and the first win.  Meanwhile, Kurosawa manages to earn a nomination (and an Oscar win) representing the USSR after not being able to get financing in Japan.  Meanwhile, Truffaut keeps France’s consecutive nomination streak alive (now at five straight years).
Herzog earns his second nomination, Tarkovsky his third, Truffaut his 7th (he goes up to 220 points and is in 4th place) and Kurosawa his 18th – he goes up to 460 points and is 40 ahead of Bergman for 1st place.
Even if I include my #5 film (Lies My Father Told Me) this is the weakest top 5 in five years.  Kaspar Hauser is the weakest winner in 9 years, the first since 1966 not to earn ****.
With the best film being submitted but passed over, the Academy earns its lowest score in this category since 1958 (a 40).

By Film:

note:  They’re in points order.  You get twice as many points for a win as for a nomination.  Hopefully your math skills will let you figure out the system.

  • Jaws  (445)
    • Picture, Director, Editing, Cinematography, Original Score, Sound, Visual Effects, Sound Editing, Makeup
  • Dog Day Afternoon   (340)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actor, Editing, Cinematography, Sound
  • The Man Who Would Be King  (330)
    • Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Actor, Editing, Cinematography, Original Score, Sound, Art Direction, Sound Editing, Costume Design, Makeup
  • One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest  (315)
    • Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Actor, Actress, Supporting Actor, Original Score, Art Direction
  • Barry Lyndon  (275)
    • Director, Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actress, Cinematography, Sound, Art Direction, Costume Design, Makeup
  • Shampoo  (240)
    • Original Screenplay, Actor, Supporting Supporting Actress, Original Score, Art Direction
  • Monty Python and the Holy Grail  (175)
    • Picture, Adapted Screenplay, Editing, Makeup, Original Song
  • Amarcord  (140)
    • Original Screenplay, Original Score, Art Direction, Costume Design, Foreign Film (1974)
  • The Story of Adele H  (105)
    • Actress, Costume Design, Foreign Film
  • Three Days of the Condor  (90)
    • Adapted Screenplay, Editing, Cinematography
  • Nashville  (90)
    • Supporting Actress, Supporting Actress, Original Song, Original Song
  • The Sunshine Boys  (65)
    • Actor, Supporting Actor
  • And Now My Love  (60)
    • Original Screenplay, Foreign Film (1974)
  • Love and Death  (40)
    • Original Screenplay
  • The French Connection 2  (40)
    • Sound, Sound Editing
  • The Great Waldo Pepper  (40)
    • Visual Effects, Sound Editing
  • The Hindenburg  (40)
    • Visual Effects, Sound Editing
  • Hester Street  (35)
    • Actress
  • Hedda  (35)
    • Actress
  • A Brief Vacation  (35)
    • Actress
  • The Day of the Locust  (30)
    • Supporting Actress
  • Phantom of Liberty  (20)
    • Foreign Film (1974)
  • The Four Musketeers  (15)
    • Costume Design
  • The Rocky Horror Picture Show  (10)
    • Makeup
  • Mahogany  (10)
    • Original Song

Analysis:  The Man Who Would Be King has the second most nominations and ties for the 3rd most points for a film to earn no wins.  After The Godfather, Cries and Whispers and Chinatown, Jaws has a big drop in points.  Barry Lyndon has the 4th most points for a film without a Best Picture nomination.

Best Film Not Nominated for Any Nighthawk Awards:

  • L’Invitation

Analysis:  A low-level ***.5 Comedy that gets to #6 in Best Foreign Film (in 1973) but doesn’t get any higher anywhere else.

Biggest Awards Film Not Nominated for Any Nighthawk Awards:

  • Lacombe Lucien

Analysis:  Louis Malle’s film is good, but I don’t think it’s as good as others do.  I have it as a high range ***.  It was nominated for Best Foreign Film at both the Oscars and the Globes.  It won Best Picture and was nominated for Director and Screenplay at the BAFTAs.  It won Best Supporting Actor from both the NBR and the NSFC.

Nighthawk Golden Globes:

Drama:

  • Best Picture
  1. Jaws
  2. Dog Day Afternoon
  3. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
  4. The Man Who Would Be King
  5. Barry Lyndon

Analysis:  The other Globe nominee was Nashville (which I consider a Musical), making this one of only two years in the 5 BP Era at the Oscars where the Globes – Drama and the Oscars matched 5-5 (the other will be 1992).

  • Best Director
  1. Steven Spielberg  (Jaws)
  2. Sidney Lumet  (Dog Day Afternoon)
  3. Stanley Kubrick  (Barry Lyndon)
  4. Milos Forman  (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)
  5. John Huston  (The Man Who Would Be King)

Analysis:  These are the first nominations for Spielberg and Forman.  It’s the fourth for Lumet, the fifth for Kubrick and the sixth for Huston, giving Huston 315 points and moving him into the Top 10.
The other Globe nominee was Robert Altman (he’s below in Comedy).  So, in Picture the Globes matched 5-5 but in Director only 4-5.  The other time Picture will match 5-5, Director will only match 3-5.

  • Best Adapted Screenplay:
  1. One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest
  2. The Man Who Would Be King
  3. Barry Lyndon
  4. Three Days of the Condor
  5. Jaws

Analysis:  Kubrick earns his fifth nomination while Huston earns his eighth.

  • Best Original Screenplay:
  1. Dog Day Afternoon
  2. And Now My Love
  3. L’Invitation
  4. Lies My Father Told Me
  5. A Brief Vacation
  • Really, he deserves this. He is a Laker fan after all.

    Really, he deserves this. He is a Laker fan after all.

    Best Actor:

  1. Jack Nicholson (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)
  2. Al Pacino  (Dog Day Afternoon)
  3. Michael Caine  (The Man Who Would Be King)
  4. Gene Hackman  (Night Moves)
  5. Georgi Taratorkin  (Crime and Punishment)

Analysis:  Hackman was nominated at the Globes, but for French Connection 2.
This is the only nomination for Taratorkin.  It’s the third nomination for Caine.  It’s the fourth straight nomination for Pacino.  It’s the fifth nomination for Hackman.  It’s the fifth nomination and third win for Nicholson.  It’s the second straight year with Nicholson and Pacino at 1-2.

  • Story-of-adele-hBest Actress
  1. Isabelle Adjani  (The Story of Adele H)
  2. Louise Fletcher  (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)
  3. Carol Kane  (Hester Street)
  4. Glenda Jackson  (Hedda)
  5. Florinda Bolkan  (A Brief Vacation)

Analysis:  These are the only nominations for Fletcher, Kane and Bolkan, the first for Adjani and the third for Jackson.

  • Best Supporting Actor:
  1. Brad Dourif  (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)
  2. John Cazale  (Dog Day Afternoon)
  3. Charles Durning  (Dog Day Afternoon)
  4. Burgess Meredith  (The Day of the Locust)
  5. Chris Sarandon  (Dog Day Afternoon)

Analysis:  These are the only nominations for Durning, Meredith and Sarandon.  It’s the first nomination for Cazale and Dourif.  This is the weakest Top 5 in this category in nine years.

  • Best Supporting Actress:
  1. Karen Black  (The Day of the Locust)
  2. Marisa Berenson  (Barry Lyndon)
  3. Faye Dunaway  (Three Days of the Condor)
  4. Sylvia Miles  (Farewell My Lovely)

Analysis:  Black and Dunaway were actually nominated as leads.  Black I can understand much more than Dunaway.  It’s the only nomination for Berenson, the second for Miles, the second for Black (also her second win) and the third for Dunaway (her only loss).

Points:

  • One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest  (340)
    • Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Actor, Actress,  Supporting Actor
  • Dog Day Afternoon  (300)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actor
  • Jaws  (230)
    • Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay
  • Barry Lyndon  (195)
    • Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress
  • The Man Who Would Be King  (170)
    • Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Actor
  • The Day of the Locust  (90)
    • Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress
  • A Brief Vacation  (75)
    • Original Screenplay, Actress
  • Three Days of the Condor  (70)
    • Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actress
  • The Story of Adele H  (70)
    • Actress
  • And Now My Love  (40)
    • Original Screenplay
  • Lies My Father Told Me  (40)
    • Original Screenplay
  • Night Moves  (35)
    • Actor
  • Crime and Punishment  (35)
    • Actor
  • Hester Street  (35)
    • Actress
  • Hedda  (35)
    • Actress
  • Farewell My Lovely  (30)
    • Supporting Actress

Analysis:  Odd, for the Picture winner to have the third most points, but it’s better than Holy Grail, below, which has the fifth most points.

Best Drama Not Nominated for Any Nighthawk Golden Globes:

  • The French Connection 2

Analysis:  The sequel to the Oscar winner is surprisingly strong (mid-range ***.5), but doesn’t get high enough in any of the major categories to earn a Drama nomination.

Comedy / Musical:

  • Best Picture
  1. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
  2. Amarcord
  3. Shampoo
  4. The Sunshine Boys
  5. Love and Death

Analysis:  With four **** films this is the best Top 5 in this category since 1969.  This is the first year with four **** films since 1964.  My #6 film, Phantom of Liberty, is the best Comedy not to make the Top 5 since 1964 and the second best since 1940.

  • Best Director
  1. Federico Fellini  (Amarcord)
  2. Luis Buñuel  (Phantom of Liberty)
  3. Hal Ashby  (Shampoo)
  4. Robert Altman  (Nashville)
  5. Woody Allen  (Love and Death)

Analysis:  Ashby, Altman and Allen earn their second nominations.  It’s the fifth nomination (and second win) for Fellini, who is at 315 points and 5th place.  It’s the 7th nomination for Buñuel, who moves up to 450 points and a tie with Billy Wilder for 2nd place.

  • Best Adapted Screenplay:
  1. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
  2. The Sunshine Boys
  • Best Original Screenplay:
  1. Amarcord
  2. Shampoo
  3. Love and Death
  4. Phantom of Liberty
  5. Hearts of the West

Analysis:  Fellini wins his fourth Comedy writing award.  Buñuel earns his sixth nomination.  Woody Allen earns his seventh.  Fellini and Allen are now tied for 4th place in points with 320.  Buñuel is tied for 6th with 280.
This is tied for the 4th best Top 5 to date, partially because it’s a complete list, but partially on the strength of the first three films.

  • the-sunshine-boys-1975Best Actor:
  1. Walter Matthau  (The Sunshine Boys)
  2. Warren Beatty  (Shampoo)
  3. Robert Redford  (The Great Waldo Pepper)
  4. Woody Allen  (Love and Death)

Analysis:  It’s the first nomination for Beatty, the second for Allen, the fourth for Matthau (his second win but first in lead) and the fifth for Redford.  Redford is now at 210 points and moves into a tie with Gene Kelly and Jimmy Stewart for 9th place.
With only four actors, this is the weakest Top 5 in this category in eight years.

  • tommyBest Actress
  1. Ann-Margret  (Tommy)
  2. Julie Christie  (Shampoo)
  3. Diane Keaton  (Love and Death)
  4. Barbra Streisand  (Funny Lady)

Analysis:  It’s the second nomination for Christie, Keaton and Streisand.  It’s also the second for Ann-Margret, but she’s won both.
Even with only four performances, this list is better than each of the last two years.

  • Best Supporting Actor:
  1. Jack Warden  (Shampoo)
  2. George Burns  (The Sunshine Boys)
  3. Richard Benjamin  (The Sunshine Boys)
  4. Henry Gibson  (Nashville)
  5. Alan Arkin  (Hearts of the West)

Analysis:  Burns actually tied with Matthau for the win in lead.  These are the only nominations for Gibson and Benjamin.  It’s the first for Burns and Warden.  It’s the third for Arkin, though he won Best Actor his first two times.
This is the best Top 5 in this category in five years and the fifth best to-date.

  • Best Supporting Actress:
  1. Lee Grant  (Shampoo)
  2. Lily Tomlin  (Nashville)
  3. Ronee Blakely  (Nashville)
  4. Goldie Hawn  (Shampoo)

Analysis:  Hawn was actually nominated as a lead.  These are the only nominations for Grant and Blakely, the first for Tomlin and the second for Hawn.
Even with only four performances, this ties 1963 for the best Top 5 to-date.  Grant is the best winner in eight years.

Points:

  • Shampoo  (355)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor, Actress, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress, Supporting Actress
  • Amarcord  (220)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay
  • The Sunshine Boys  (220)
    • Picture, Adapted Screenplay, Actor, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actor
  • Love and Death  (205)
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor, Actress
  • Monty Python and the Holy Grail  (180)
    • Picture, Adapted Screenplay
  • Nashville  (135)
    • Director, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress, Supporting Actress
  • Phantom of Liberty  (85)
    • Director, Original Screenplay
  • Hearts of the West  (70)
    • Original Screenplay, Supporting Actor
  • Tommy  (70)
    • Actress
  • L’Invitation  (40)
    • Actress
  • The Great Waldo Pepper  (35)
    • Actor
  • Funny Lady  (35)
    • Actress

Analysis:  Shampoo ties for the 6th most Globe points with a BP win (tied for 3rd among Comedies).

Best Comedy Not Nominated for any Nighthawk Golden Globes:

  • And Now for Something Completely Different

Analysis:  The clip movie of Monty Python finally hit the States in 1975 (it was originally released in the U.K. in 1971) but it doesn’t really fit into any categories properly to earn a nomination.

Roundup for the Year in Film:

Eligible Films I Have Seen:  143

By Stars:

  • ****:  10
  • ***.5:  6
  • ***:  60
  • **.5:  32
  • **:  20
  • *.5:  3
  • *:  9
  • .5:  1
  • 0:  2
  • Average Film Score for the Year, out of 100:  59.11

Analysis:  A slight rise from the year before.  The 2 zero star films are offset by the increase in *** films.

Oscar-Nominated Films I Have Not Seen:

  • Whiffs  (Best Song)

note:  As I discussed in my Best Song post, in this year and the next year, the two most recent nominees in the category I haven’t seen are the final nominations for two long-time songwriters.  This was the final nomination for Sammy Cahn and I have never been able to find it.

Other Award Nominated Films I Have Not Seen (in descending order of points total):

  • none

Oscar Quality:

Best Picture:  This year ranks 24th all-time, which is weaker than the previous three years, yet is better than every year before that.  The nominees average an 88, which makes this only the third year to average ****.  What keeps it from really breaking through is the lack of a Top 10 film like the previous three years all had.  In fact, this year doesn’t even have a Top 50 film.

The Winners:  Among the nominees, this is the best year since the 1st Oscars, which had a lot fewer categories.  Every Tech winner is the best of the nominees (the first time this has happened).  Overall, the winners average a 1.41 among the nominees.  In fact, Picture and Director, which are both my 3rd choices, are the only winners that aren’t either the best or 2nd best among the nominees.  Among all films, the winners average a 1.79, the best to date (and the best through at least 1988).  Only four winners aren’t either the best or 2nd best of the year: Picture (3rd), Director, Sound Effects Editing and Foreign Film (all 4th).  It joins 1948 and 1972 as the only years so far in which every winner at least earns a Nighthawk nomination.

The Nominees:  Overall, this is the best year to date, with a score of 74.7, just a hair better than the year before.  It’s lead by the Tech categories, whose score of 67.1 is the best to-date by almost four points.  Cinematography is terrible (36.1) and Sound is back to mediocrity (48.4), but Editing has its best score by almost 30 points (97.1) and Art Direction has its highest in seven years (79.4).  The Acting score is an 89.8, which is the fourth highest to date and all four categories score at least an 80.  The major categories are a solid 77.8 with Adapted Screenplay (69.7) the only one below a 75.

Golden Globe Best Picture – Comedy / Musical:  This year is ranked 48th out of 65, which is certainly not very good.  But, it’s between 1974 (#60) and 1976 (#61), so it looks pretty good by comparison.  The Globes made two absolutely correct choices in The Sunshine Boys (their winner) and Shampoo, though I would have preferred the latter.  But their other three choices were simply terrible: The Return of the Pink Panther (my #24 Comedy of the year), Funny Lady (#28) and Tommy (#33).  True, some of the films I rank above them wouldn’t have been eligible (Amarcord, Phantom of Liberty, L’Invitation) and some of them are hardly things the Globes would have ever nominated (Monty Python and the Holy Grail, And Now for Something Completely Different, Rocky Horror Picture Show, Bugs Bunny Superstar) and at least one of them was nominated as a Drama (Nashville).  But look at some of the other films that still leaves: Love and Death, The Great Waldo Pepper, Hearts of the West, The Four Musketeers, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter Brother.  Any of those would have been much better choices than those final three.

Top 5 Films of the Year:

1  –  Jaws  (reviewed here)

2  –  Dog Day Afternoon  (reviewed here)

3  –  One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest  (reviewed here)

John Huston does adventure right.

John Huston does adventure right.

4  –  The Man Who Would Be King  (dir. John Huston)

This was a passion project for John Huston for years.  He had read the Kipling story as a boy and desperately wanted to make this film.  First he wanted to make it in the 50’s with Bogart and Gable.  Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas were set and then Burton and O’Toole  Then he considered doing it with Newman and Redford, after the success of Butch.  But, in the end, the right choice was made in terms of the actors’ nationality and it ended up being made with Sean Connery (as Daniel Dravot) and Michael Caine (as Peachy Carnahan).  In the end, it worked out the way it should have – I can’t imagine two actors who would be better suited for these parts.

These two are a couple of adventurers.  When we first meet Peachy, he has stolen a man’s watch, only to return it when he discovers the man is a fellow Mason (after throwing another man off the train for the theft).  Then he and Danny are off to run a blackmail scheme which involves them claiming they are correspondents for The Northern Star, which is a problem since the man who owns the watch, a Mr. Kipling (played quite well by Christopher Plummer) actually is the correspondent for The Northern Star.  He saves them from jail when their scheme goes south and before long they show up in his office explaining their new scheme: they’re going to go to Kafiristan, conquer it with some British rifles, loot the place, and come back rich.

The first part of the film consists of the set-up (which works well as the characters are so rich and so perfectly embodied by the three stars) and the journey (which is simply beautiful – Huston is really out in the wild for the first time since The African Queen and it’s no wonder that so many critics called this his finest film since that one and they were right).  The second part consists of them doing precisely what they set out to do – with minimal arms and a whole lot of gusto (and the help of a Gurkha who was left behind on a mapping expedition and who can act as translator) they are soon set up as the new rulers.  Or, more precisely, Danny is set up as a god after a couple of incidents are misconstrued (his bandolier stops an arrow and when a priest goes to stab him he is stopped by the Masonic symbol, which makes the priest think he is the descendant of Alexander the Great and their god come to life).

Now, the final third is where they get into all the trouble you expected in the first place.  Peachy is anxious to go.  Danny quite likes being a god.  Peachy just wants some treasure and a good time back home.  Danny wants to meet Victoria as an equal and marry the good-looking Roxanne.  Everything falls apart from here, leading to Danny’s unforgettable line: “Peachy, I’m heartily ashamed for getting you killed instead of going home rich like you deserve to, on account of being so bleedin’ high and bloody mighty.  Can you forgive me?”  He does.  We do to, not just because the film is so good (magnificent cinematography, a wonderful score, beautiful costumes, first-rate writing that brings a wonderful short story vividly to life) but because what would we have done.  Remember the immortal words: “When someone asks if you’re a god, you say yes.”  He said yes, and it lead to his downfall.  But it was a hell of a ride while it lasted.

My sister was bitten by a moose once.

My sister was bitten by a moose once.

5  –  Monty Python and the Holy Grail  (dir. Terry Jones / Terry Gilliam)

I came to this film in a way that most people probably didn’t – I watched it in class, in 9th grade Honors English.  We watched it over the course of three class periods when we were studying the Arthur legend (we also watched Ladyhawke as an example of an Arthurian romance) and our teacher meant to fast-forward over the line “And then the oral sex” but she was absent that day and our principal, who was subbing, didn’t even seem to notice (he wasn’t a very good principal; she was a fantastic teacher).  I have since watched it in so many different circumstances – in a packed theater in Portland where everyone knew every word, with someone who only really laughed at one moment (when the animator has his fatal heart attack), with friends in college, by myself any time I need a laugh.  I wonder, if I were to ask people, how many different answers I would get about what is the funniest moment or line in the film.  I’ve known people who think it’s the monks.  Before I first saw it I heard the most about the killer rabbit.  I just asked Veronica and she said “I got better.”  My personal favorite line is “Build a bridge out of her!”  There are so many different possibilities because this is the funniest film ever made.

There is one particular moment that seems to be a favorite of everyone and it brings me back to that same teacher.  Most of us who had been in that class had her again three years later as our AP English teacher.  In that class, we read The Stranger.  In discussing the book, we got to the point where Meursault shoots the Arab.  My friend Jake shouted out “It’s only a flesh wound.”  Before I turned to reply to him, my eyes caught those of our teacher.  She knew she was doomed.  These were the same students she had taken through Holy Grail and she knew there was no point intervening before the routine had played itself out.  With my paraphrased response “What are you talking about?  I shot your arm off?” we were off and running.

In between those two moments, there was my Honors US History class my junior year.  The final test was 150 questions long with a bonus question at the end.  I was the top student in the class and had a tendency to finish every test first and this was no exception.  I got to the end of the test only to find a 151st bonus question: What is the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow?  So, I raised my hand and Mr. Brunt called on me and I said “What do you mean?  African or European?”  “Correct,” he replied, which sent everyone flipping to the end of the test.  Most of them had been in that 9th grade class.  They understood.  They laughed.

I have said almost nothing about this film and yet I have said almost everything that needs to be said.  Last night, watching Jurassic World, when the two kids go off into the jungle I started joking with Veronica about how they were headed into peril.  “Let me go back in there and face the peril.”  “No, it’s too perilous.”  Little moments from Holy Grail come up at almost any time.  In what other movie could the phrase “very small rocks” be so ridiculously funny?  We have a stuffed polar bear who yells “Come and see the violence inherent in the system!”  That’s hilarious to us.  It should be hilarious to you too, because every moment in this film is funny, from the opening credits (“Come and see the majestic moose.”) to that final moment when the whole crew is just hauled off to jail.  If you’re not laughing your ass off when you’re watching this film, the problem is not with the film, it’s with you.

5 Worst Films  (#1 being the worst):

  1. Female Trouble
  2. Death Race 2000
  3. Mandingo
  4. Foreplay
  5. Beyond the Door

note:

My own little XKCD type cartoon to describe my feelings.

My own little xkcd type cartoon to describe my feelings.

Female Trouble  (dir. John Waters)

I know that John Waters is a director who is revered in some circles.  I strongly suspect that they are a lot of the same people who are fans of camp.  I think the diagram to the right makes my feelings clear on this.

Don’t get me wrong.  I don’t think that Waters is completely void of talent.  Later in his career, he would look back at growing up in Baltimore and make what I think are his two best films: Hairspray and Cry-Baby.  Those films actually have genuine characters and story and something interesting that is worth watching.  What he does in films like Female Trouble and Desperate Living (which I will tackle when I get to 1977) is the kind of grotesque gross-out which Waters clearly finds amusing and which has found a clear cult audience but which I just find repulsive.

So that brings up this question: am I just not in on the joke?  Because I don’t appreciate this am I part of the over-cultured masses who can’t appreciate trash when I see it?  Or does that mean I make a decision that such things don’t have an appeal?  To me, this works on the same level as camp – I am supposed to enjoy it for what it is, not for any art involved.  There is nothing like worthwhile directing, the acting is beyond atrocious (Divine is a particular favorite of Waters but I find his/her (I don’t know which to properly use) “acting” just too painful) and the writing is designed to appeal to a base level that I don’t respond to.  Even the title is supposed to appeal to us in that same way.  I am, I presume, supposed to find it funny.  I do not.  I’ll go with Holy Grail and leaves this alone.

Points:

  • Most Nighthawk Nominations:   The Man Who Would Be King  (12)
  • Most Nighthawk Awards:  Jaws  (7)
  • Most Nighthawk Points:  Jaws  (445)
  • Worst Film Nominated for a Nighthawk Award:  The Hindenburg
  • 2nd Place Award:  Dog Day Afternoon  (Picture, Director, Actor, Editing)
  • 6th Place Award:  Amarcord  (Picture, Director, Cinematography)
  • Most Nighthawk Drama Nominations:  Dog Day Afternoon  (7)
  • Most Nighthawk Drama Awards:  One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest   (3)
  • Most Nighthawk Drama Points:  One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest   (340)
  • Worst Film Nominated for a Nighthawk Drama Award:  Hedda
  • Most Nighthawk Comedy Nominations:  Shampoo  (8)
  • Most Nighthawk Comedy Awards:  Shampoo  /  Amarcord  /  Monty Python and the Holy Grail  (2)
  • Most Nighthawk Comedy Points:  Shampoo  (355)
  • Worst Film Nominated for a Nighthawk Comedy Award:  Tommy

Note:  * means a Nighthawk record up to this point; ** ties a Nighthawk record

Note:  The Man Who Would Be King also had four second place finishes, but the points for Dog Day were much higher.

Progressive Leaders:

  • Most Nighthawk Nominations:  The Wizard of Oz  /  The Godfather  (18)
  • Most Nighthawk Awards:  The Wizard of Oz  /  Bonnie and Clyde  (14)
  • Most Nighthawk Points:  Bonnie and Clyde  (865)
  • Most Nighthawk Awards without winning Best Picture:  Frankenstein  /  The Magnificent Ambersons  (6)
  • Most Nighthawk Nominations without a Best Picture Nomination:  Yojimbo  (11)
  • Most Nighthawk Nominations without a Nighthawk Award:  Throne of Blood (13)
  • Actor:  Humphrey Bogart  (475)
  • Actress:  Katharine Hepburn  (560)
  • Director:   Billy Wilder  (585)
  • Writer:  Billy Wilder  (960)
  • Cinematographer:  Arthur Edeson  /  Gregg Toland / Sven Nykvist  (200)
  • Composer:  Max Steiner  (450)
  • Foreign Film:  Akira Kurosawa  (460)

Breakdown by Genre  (Foreign in parenthesis, best film in genre following, avg. score is afterwards, in parenthesis):

  • Foreign:  49  –  Amarcord  (65.9)
  • Drama:  44 (24)  –  One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest  (61.2)
  • Comedy:  22 (5)  –  Monty Python and the Holy Grail  (64.2)
  • Musical:  14 (1)  –  The Rocky Horror Picture Show  (55.1)
  • Crime:  12 (4)  –  Dog Day Afternoon  (54.3)
  • Horror:  11 (5)  –  Jaws  (54.7)
  • Action:  11 (2)  –  The French Connection 2  (43.8)
  • Adventure:  7 (1)  –  The Man Who Would Be King  (70.1)
  • Kids:  4 (2)  –  Bugs Bunny Superstar  (59.8)
  • Suspense:  4 (2)  –  Three Days of the Condor  (70.5)
  • Mystery:  4 (1)  –  Night Moves  (65)
  • Western:  3 (1)  –  Bite the Bullet  (55.7)
  • Fantasy:  2 (1)  –  A Midsummer Night’s Dream  (59.5)
  • Sci-Fi:  2  –  Dark Star  (50.5)
  • War:  1 (1)  –  The Battle of Sutjeska  (64)

Analysis:  There are only 44 Dramas out of 143 total films, or 30.77%, the third lowest to date.  The 11 Action films tie the high to-date – they also have the lowest average to-date.  The 7 Adventure films are the highest since 1962 – they also have the highest average since 1939.  The 12 Crime films are the third highest to-date.  The 11 Horror films are the lowest from 1969 to 1981, but they have the highest average since 1968.  The 14 Musicals are the highest in seven years and tied for the second most since 1952.
The Man Who Would Be King is the only the third Adventure film since 1939 to make the Top 10.  The are 8 Comedies in the Top 20 for the first time since 1940.  Jaws becomes only the third Horror film to win the Nighthawk.

Studio Note:  For the first time ever, no major studio has more than 12 films (Columbia and 20th Century-Fox).  They’re followed by 10 each for Warner Bros and Paramount.  The majors account for just under 45% of the films, which is better than the year before but still the second lowest to-date.  The Wind and the Lion becomes the first MGM/UA film which complicates how I track the studios.  New Line starts to emerge as a distribution studio, with 6 films.
Universal becomes the last of the majors to win a third Best Picture award, 17 years after it became the last to win its second.  The Sunshine Boys becomes the first MGM film in the Top 10 in 7 years.

40 Films Eligible for Best Foreign Film (alphabetical, with director and country in parenthesis – red are ****, blue are ***.5 – both those colors qualify for my Best Foreign Film Award; an asterisk means it was the Official selection for the Oscar, two asterisks were nominated, three asterisks won the Oscar):

  • Adoption  (Fassbinder, West Germany)  *
  • Black Moon  (Wenders, West Germany)
  • Bullet Train  (Taviani, Italy)
  • Cat and Mouse  (Fellini, Italy)
  • Chronicle of the Years of Fire  (Lakhdar-Ham, Algeria)  *
  • Conjugal Warfare  (de Andrade, Brazil)
  • The Day That Shook the World  (Bulajic, Yugoslavia)  *
  • Dersu Uzala  (Kurosawa, USSR)  ***
  • Dirty Hands  (Chabrol, France)
  • Dripping Deep Red  (Argento, Italy)
  • Flaklypa Grand Prix  (Caprino, Norway)
  • Four of the Apocalypse  (Fulci, Italy)
  • Fox and His Friends  (Fassbinder, West Germany)
  • Gina  (Arcand, Canada)
  • Godzilla vs Mechagodzilla  (Honda, Japan)
  • India Song  (Duras, France)  *
  • Je Tu Il Elle  (Akerman, France)
  • Land of Promise  (Wajda, Poland)  **
  • Letters from Marusia  (Littin, Mexico)  **
  • Lies My Father Told Me  (Kadar, Canada)
  • The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum  (Schlondorff, West Germany)
  • The Magic Pony  (Ivanonv-Vano, USSR)
  • The Messiah  (Rossellini, Italy)
  • The Mirror  (Tarkovsky, USSR)
  • Mother Kusters Goes to Heaven  (Fassbinder, West Germany)
  • My Little Loves  (Eustache, France)
  • The Mystery of Kaspar Hauser  (Herzog, West Germany)  *
  • Nazareno Cruz and the Wolf  (Favio, Argentina)  *
  • Night’s End  (Benegal, India)
  • Ogum’s Amulet  (dos Santos, Brazil)  *
  • One Hundred Days After Childhood  (Solovev, USSR)
  • Poachers  (Borau, Spain)  *
  • Salo  (Pasolini, Italy)
  • Sandakan no 8  (Kumai, Japan)  **
  • Scent of a Woman  (Risi, Italy)  **
  • Sholay  (Sippy, India)
  • Special Section  (Costa-Gavras, France)
  • The Story of Adele H  (Truffaut, France)
  • Terror of Mechagodzilla  (Honda, Japan)
  • The Traveling Players  (Angelopoulos, Greece)  *

Note:  I have only my second film from Algeria.  I have only my third film from Norway and the first one in 18 years.  For the first time, I have multiple films from Canada.  For the first time in 10 years I don’t have a Swedish film.  As usual, France has the most (8) and is followed by Italy (5).  The 40 overall films is the fewest in five years and tied for the fewest in 10 years.  After years of Dramas being half or a little less than half the Foreign Films, this year they account for 60% of the Foreign films, the highest since 1956.

Foreign Films Submitted for Best Foreign Film at the Oscars That I Haven’t Seen:

  • Czechoslovakia:  Circus in the Circus  (dir. Lipsky)
  • Denmark:  Per  (dir. Kristensen)
  • Egypt:  I Want a Solution  (dir. Marzouk)
  • Israel:  My Michael  (dir. Wolman)
  • Netherlands:  Dr Pulder Sows Poppies  (dir. Haanstra)
  • Switzerland:  Confrontation  (dir. Lyssy)

note:  At this point I am making a concerted effort to see as many submitted films as I can.  The full list can be found here.  This year I am 15 for 21.
It’s the second time I’m missing a Czech submission and the middle of a streak of three years.  Denmark continues to be my bane: I am 3 for 16 to this point.  It’s the fourth time I’m missing the Egyptian submission and the second in a row.  I am 4 for 9 with Israel at this point, having been unable to find the film any time it didn’t receive a nomination.  It’s the third time in eight submissions that I am missing the Netherlands.  It’s the second year in a row I am missing Switzerland.
There’s one more country submitting than the year before.  There’s no Bulgaria, Belgium, and for only the fifth time, no India.  Instead, Israel and Canada are back as are Algeria and Greece after five year absences.

Films Eligible in This Year But Originally Released in a Different Year:

  • A Page of Madness  (1926)
  • A Hen in the Wind  (1948)
  • Dr. Syn  (1964)
  • Gulliver’s Travels Beyond the Moon  (1966)
  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream  (1968)
  • Porcile  (1969)
  • Aladdin and His Magic Lamp  (1970)
  • Crime and Punishment  (1970)
  • Donkey Skin  (1970)
  • La Rupture  (1970)
  • Valerie and Her Week of Wonders  (1970)
  • And Now For Something Completely Different  (1971)
  • Happy Birthday, Wanda June  (1971)
  • Just Before Nightfall  (1971)
  • Maid in Sweden  (1971)
  • Ciao Manhattan  (1972)
  • Dirty Money  (1972)
  • The Battle of Sutjeska  (1973)
  • A Brief Vacation  (1973)
  • The House on Chelouche Street  (1973)
  • Hunchback of the Morgue  (1973)
  • L’Emmerdeur  (1973)
  • L’Invitation  (1973)
  • Nothing but the Night  (1973)
  • Amarcord  (1974)
  • And Now My Love  (1974)
  • Battles Without Honour or Humanity: Final Episode  (1974)
  • Betty Boop Scandals  (1974)
  • Beyond the Door  (1974)
  • The Castle of Sand  (1974)
  • Dark Star  (1974)
  • Female Trouble  (1974)
  • Journey Back to Oz  (1974)
  • Lacombe Lucien  (1974)
  • Launcelot du Lac  (1974)
  • Lemora: A Child’s Tale of the Supernatural  (1974)
  • Let Sleeping Corpses Lie  (1974)
  • The Magic Flute  (1974)
  • Mahler  (1974)
  • The Nada Gang  (1974)
  • The Nickel Ride  (1974)
  • The Phantom of Liberty  (1974)
  • The Return of the Pink Panther  (1974)
  • Return of the Streetfighter  (1974)
  • Stardust  (1974)
  • Stavisky  (1974)
  • The Streetfighter  (1974)
  • Swept Away  (1974)

Note:  These 43 films average a 61.8.  They account for a remarkable 17 Nighthawk nominations, including two for Picture and three for Director.  Day for Night, Scenes from a Marriage andBadlands make this a much more competitive year than if I just went by original release date.

Films Not Listed at Oscars.org:

  • Adoption
  • Autobiography of a Princess
  • The Battle of Sutjeska
  • Battles Without Honor or Humanity: Final Episode
  • Chronicle of the Years of Fire
  • Conjugal Warfare
  • Dirty Money
  • Four of the Apocalypse
  • Gina
  • A Hen in the Wind
  • Hunchback of the Morgue
  • India Song
  • L’Emmerdeur
  • L’Invitation
  • Land of Promise
  • Lemora: A Child’s Tale of the Supernatural
  • Let Sleeping Corpses Lie
  • The Messiah
  • Nazareno Cruz and His Wolf
  • Night’s End
  • Nothing but the Night
  • One Hundred Days After Childhood
  • A Page of Madness
  • Porcile
  • Race with the Devil
  • Sholay
  • Switchblade Sisters
  • Welcome Home Brother Charles

Note:  I use the list at Oscars.org for deciding which year films are eligible in.  Some films, however, don’t appear in that database.  For those films, I use the IMDb.  These are the films that aren’t listed in the Oscars.org database but that end up in this year.
As is usually the case, most of these are Foreign films which never get an L.A. release. For once, the number of films on this list that were submitted in this year to the Oscars for Best Foreign Film is small (The Battle of Sutjeska, Nazareno Cruz and the Wolf) but that’s mainly because they mostly seemed to have gotten an L.A. release, either this year or later, and most of them are eligible in other years.  Even Battle is from 1973, not 1975.

Films Released This Year Originally But Eligible in a Different Year:

  • Bullet Train  (1976)
  • The Giant Spider Invasion  (1976)
  • Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla  (1976)
  • Marco Polo  (1976)
  • The Mystery of Kaspar Hauser  (1976)
  • Shivers  (1976)
  • Terror of Mechagodzilla  (1976)
  • The Wild Party  (1976)
  • Black Moon  (1977)
  • The Day That Shook the World  (1977)
  • Dersu Uzala  (1977)
  • Dripping Deep Red  (1977)
  • Fox and His Friends  (1977)
  • The Magic Pony  (1977)
  • Mother Kusters Gone to Heaven  (1977)
  • Salo  (1977)
  • Cat and Mouse  (1978)
  • Dirty Hands  (1978)
  • Hugo the Hippo  (1978)
  • Poachers  (1978)
  • Picnic at Hanging Rock  (1979)
  • Shame of the Jungle  (1979)
  • The Devil’s Playground  (1980)
  • Flaklypa Grand Prix  (1981)
  • The Mirror  (1983)
  • The Smurfs and the Magic Flute  (1983)
  • Je Tu Il Elle  (1985)
  • Letters from Marusia  (1985)
  • My Little Loves  (1987)
  • Ogum’s Amulet  (1987)
  • The Traveling Players  (1990)

Note:  These 31 films average a 58.4. There is only one great film (Picnic at Hanging Rock), although The Mystery of Kaspar Hauser is close.

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