Introduction

oscarsThis is a companion piece to three different series.  The first is The History of the Academy Awards, in which I covered each category in individual posts.  This was originally done in 2009 and additions were included in 2010.  You can find links to all of these pieces in each individual category.  I have grouped all of the categories together for the same reason that I did so originally – because most pieces on the Oscars don’t approach the awards through the categories, but through the years.  This specific piece is designed to take a closer look at the decade and how I think the Academy did in those years.

The second series is my Year in Film series.  That is mentioned here because in those pieces I included paragraphs about the Oscars as a whole for each year and included a considerable amount of trivia.  Since I had based my Year in Film series and eligibility as such on the Academy calendar, it all seemed very relevant.  Also, I include various prizes (Worst Oscar, Worst Nomination, Worst Omission, etc) and I didn’t want to repeat myself, so following the links will bring you there.  Those links are at the end of this piece, where I do a brief summation of each year and how the Academy did.  One note on the Year in Film posts – I did those before Oscars.org started putting up official information about release dates.  Several films have been moved from the years where they appeared in those posts – see the Nighthawk Awards posts for more accurate placement – I have included links in the years.

The third series is my History of the Academy Awards: Best Picture series, where I reviewed every film ever nominated for Best Picture (except The Patriot, which is lost).  Those links are also down below, grouped by year.

Keys to all the Numbers / Ranks / Scores, etc:  There are a lot of numbers and lists down below.  The lists are often easy to understand, the numbers not so much.

  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  That takes the winner (say, Actor in 1945) and says where I would rank it for the year (#1 in this case).  Then I average it out, either for category (the first part) or by year (the bottom part).  The closer to 1, the better.
  • Average Winner Rank (without Picture):  Because I rank all films for the year but don’t rank every film in every category, the Best Picture category can really throw things off, especially since every film is eligible in this category.  So, in a year like 1932-33, where Best Picture (Cavalcade) is my #99 film of the year but no other winner ranks below #22, the average winner rank goes from 9.13 to 19.11.  So, down below, in the years, I include a score both with and without Best Picture.
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  Quite simply what it says.  Cavalcade may have ranked 99th on the year, but only 8th among the 10 Best Picture nominees.  The key is this – the first Average Winner rank tells you what I think of the winner.  This one tells you what I think they in relation to what they nominated.  Like, in Best Art Direction (color), where from 1946 to 1949 my Winner Ranks are 6, 1, 1 and 5.  But all four of them were the best choice among the nominees, so the score was 1, 1, 1, 1.  A high disproportion between the two scores means I think they botched the nominees, but that will show up in the Score.  Again, the closer to 1, the better.
  • Score:  This is a score of their nominees versus mine.  It’s complicated and bizarre and has to do with assigning a numeric value to a function of art.  But it measures a year against itself.  1978 is a good example – not a single one of my Best Picture nominees from 1978 would have made my list for 1977.  But if the Academy and I agreed 5 for 5, it would still score 100.  It’s a comparison between what the Oscars nominated and what I think they should have nominated, not a comparison to any other year.  Suffice it to say, the closer to 100 the better.  By the way, the Score determines the Best and Worst Year in everything except Picture, which is ranked based on my original ranked list.
  • Score  (P-D-S):  The score, averaged among Picture, Director and Screenplay.
  • Score  (Acting):  The score, averaged among the four acting categories.
  • Score  (Tech):  The score, averaged among Editing, Cinematography, Score, Sound, Art Direction, Visual Effects and Costume Design (and in later decades Sound Editing and Makeup).

Stats and Trivia for the Decade:

  • Most Nominations:
  1. Mary Poppins  /  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf  (13)
  2. My Fair Lady  /  Becket  (12)
  3. West Side Story  /  Judgment at Nuremberg  /  Oliver!  (11)

note:  At the time, Mary Poppins and Woolf were tied for second all-time in nominations.  They are currently tied for third.  No film would reach 13 nominations again until 1994.  There are numerous films with 10 nominations because this is the only decade where at least one film reached double-digits in every single year.

  • Most Oscars:
  1. West Side Story  (10)
  2. My Fair Lady  (8)
  3. Lawrence of Arabia  (7)
  4. A Man for All Seasons  (6)

note:  West Side Story was only the second film to reach double-digits in Oscars.  No film would do it again until 1997 and West Side Story is still fourth all-time.  It’s a bit strange that the top three films on this list all failed to win for their screenplays.

  • west_side_storyMost Points:
  1. West Side Story  (610)
  2. My Fair Lady  (565)
  3. Lawrence of Arabia  (525)
  4. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf  (520)
  5. The Apartment  (505)
  6. Tom Jones  (495)
  7. Oliver!  (490)
  8. A Man for All Seasons  (480)
  9. Mary Poppins  (455)
  10. Judgment at Nuremberg  /  The Sound of Music  (425)

note:  West Side Story is still in the Top 10 all-time.  No film would have over 600 points again until 1996.  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf is still the record-holder for a film that didn’t win Best Picture, with Cabaret being the only other one to even break 500.  The other two Best Picture winners are In the Heat of the Night (405 – tied for 13th) and Midnight Cowboy (395 – tied for 15th).  Ironically, Midnight Cowboy, the BP winner with the lowest points total is one of only four films to sweep Picture-Director-Screenplay in the decade.

  • Number of Films Nominated for a Feature Film Oscar:  364
  • Number of Films Nominated for Multiple Oscars:  176
  • Number of Films to win a Feature Film Oscar:  105
  • Number of Films to win multiple Oscars:  41
  • Most Nominations without Best Picture:  They Shoot Horses, Don’t They  (9)  *
  • Most Oscars without winning Best Picture:  Mary Poppins  /  Dr. Zhivago  /  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf  (5)
  • Most Oscars without a Best Picture nomination:  Spartacus  (4)  **
  • Most Points without a Best Picture nomination:  Hud  (320)  *
  • Most Nominations with No Wins:  The Sand Pebbles  (8)
  • Films Nominated for All 4 Acting Categories:  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf  /  Bonnie and Clyde  /  Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner
  • Films Nominated for All 5 Major Tech Categories:  Pepe  /  West Side Story  /  Lawrence of Arabia  /  Cleopatra  /  How the West Was Won  /  Mary Poppins  /  Becket  /  Dr. Zhivago  /  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf  /  The Sand Pebbles  /  Dr. Dolittle  ***
  • Films to Win All 5 Major Tech Categories:  West Side Story  /  Lawrence of Arabia  ****

*  –  still a record
**  –  tied for second most ever
***  –  only two films in the 50’s did this, while 11 films did it in the first eight years of this decade.
****  –  only the second and third films to do this and it wouldn’t happen again until 1987.

  • Director with Most Films Nominated for Best Picture:  Stanley Kramer / Robert Wise  (3)  –  Wise would win twice
  • Director with Most Films Nominated for an Oscar:
  1. John Frankenheimer  (7)
  2. Stanley Kramer  /  Delbert Mann  (6)
  3. Richard Brooks  /  Blake Edwards  /  George Roy Hill  /  Robert Wise  (5)
  • 030-katharine-hepburn-and-spencer-tracy-theredlistDirector with Most Total Nominations for their Films:
  1. Stanley Kramer  (41)
  2. Robert Wise  (38)
  3. George Roy Hill  (23)
  4. David Lean  /  Mike Nichols  (20)

note:  Lean and Nichols are particularly effective as each only made two films in the decade.

  • Director with Most Oscars for their Films:
  1. Robert Wise  (15)
  2. David Lean  (12)
  3. George Cukor  (8)
  4. Stanley Kramer  /  Billy Wilder  (7)
  • Director with Most Points for their Films:
  1. Robert Wise  (1445)
  2. Stanley Kramer  (1435)
  3. David Lean  (945)
  4. Mike Nichols  (825)
  5. Billy Wilder  (755)

note:  Remember – David Lean did that with only two films.

  • image002161Studio with Most Best Picture Nominees:
  1. United Artists  (12)
  2. 20th Century-Fox  (10)
  3. Warner Bros  /  Columbia  (8)
  • Studio with Most Best Picture Wins:
  1. United Artists  (5)
  2. Columbia  (3)

note on Studios:  There were originally 8 major studios, but RKO had gone out of business in 1958.  Four of them are listed above.  MGM and Paramount would each earn 3 nominations and Universal would finally earn one in 1969 for the first time since 1937.  Disney would also earn its first nomination in 1964.  Avco Embassy would also arise as an independent, earning three nominations and Cinema V would earn one in 1969 with the first Foreign Film nominated for Best Picture since 1938.  Fox would actually do the best on one level, earning nominations in nine of the 10 years.  But in 1960, UA would become the first studio in the 5 BP Era to earn three nominations.  The other two winners would be Warners (1964) and Fox (1965).  UA would earn 800 points in the decade, the most for any studio outside of the 30’s when there were far, far more nominees.

Best Picture

Only five films in Oscar history have won at least 7 Oscars, have won Best Picture and failed to win the award for Screenplay.  Three of them are in the first half of this decade (West Side Story, Lawrence of Arabia, My Fair Lady) and a fourth was in 1959 (Ben Hur) (the fifth wouldn’t be until 1996).  Yet, the decade would end with Midnight Cowboy, one of only three films to win Picture, Director and Screenplay and no other Oscars and the first film since 1955 to win Best Picture without winning in any Tech categories.  This decade would continue the trend of the previous decade with no Best Picture winner winning for Best Actress.  Indeed, only two winners would even be nominated for Best Actress while only two winners would fail to be nominated for Best Actor.  West Side Story, though, the only winner in the decade to fail to earn a nomination in a lead acting category would become only the second (and to date, last) winner to win both supporting acting awards.  After it happened three times in each of the two previous decades, In the Heat of the Night would be the only Picture winner to not win Best Director.  The Sound of Music would be the only Best Picture winner between 1948 and 1997 to fail to earn a writing nomination.  In the Heat of the Night would become the first (and, until 1994, only) winner to earn a nomination for its sound effects.  1962 becomes the only year in the 5 BP Era to have multiple films earn a Picture nomination with no nomination for Director, writing or acting; amazingly it has three (The Music Man, Mutiny on the Bounty, The Longest Day), the same number as 1963-1990 combined.

Richard Burton and Hugh Griffith would be the king of the Best Picture.  Burton would be in five different nominees (three of which he would earn Best Actor nominations for).  Griffith would be in one nominee and two winners (Tom Jones and Oliver!).  Susannah York (Tom Jones and A Man for All Seasons) is the only other person to star in two winners.

I have already said so much on this category in my other posts (see at the bottom, listed under each year).

The nominees go back up a lot from the previous decade, averaging a 78.5 (low-range ***.5), with 1961 the best (84.8) and 1963 having the lowest average, not only of the decade, but of any year after 1931 (64.6).  The average winner ranks at 159.2 which is a huge improvement over the previous decades.  The winners from 1960 to 1962 are the only time that three winners in a row all make the Top 50 of all Best Picture nominees.

  • Best Year:  1961
  • Worst Year:  1963
  • Best Winner:  Lawrence of Arabia
  • Worst Winner:  The Sound of Music
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Bonnie and Clyde
  • Worst Nominee:  Doctor Dolittle
  • Most Egregious Snub:  The Wild Bunch
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  10.5  *
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.3
  • Score for the Decade:  48.9

* – If you take out The Sound of Music and Oliver!, this drops to an impressive 3.2.

lawrence-of-arabia-1962Winners (ranked):

  1. Lawrence of Arabia
  2. West Side Story
  3. The Apartment
  4. A Man for All Seasons
  5. Tom Jones
  6. In the Heat of the Night
  7. My Fair Lady
  8. Midnight Cowboy
  9. Oliver!
  10. The Sound of Music

BONNIE-AND-CLYDE-UK-Poster-by-Tom-Chantrell10 Best Nominees That Didn’t Win:

  1. Bonnie and Clyde
  2. Dr. Strangelove
  3. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf
  4. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
  5. To Kill a Mockingbird
  6. Z
  7. Dr. Zhivago
  8. The Music Man
  9. The Lion in Winter
  10. The Hustler

dolittle10 Worst Nominees (#1 being the Worst)

  1. Doctor Dolittle
  2. Cleopatra
  3. Mutiny on the Bounty
  4. The Alamo
  5. Zorba the Greek
  6. Ship of Fools
  7. How the West Was Won
  8. Hello, Dolly!
  9. Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner
  10. The Sand Pebbles

wildTen Biggest Snubs:

  1. The Wild Bunch
  2. 2001: A Space Odyssey
  3. Chimes at Midnight
  4. Ikiru
  5. The Virgin Spring
  6. Throne of Blood
  7. Once Upon a Time in the West
  8. The Cranes are Flying
  9. Winter Light
  10. The Great Escape

Ten Biggest English-Language Snubs:

  1. The Wild Bunch
  2. 2001: A Space Odyssey
  3. Chimes at Midnight
  4. Once Upon a Time in the West
  5. The Great Escape
  6. The Producers
  7. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
  8. A Hard Day’s Night
  9. Spartacus
  10. Psycho

Ten Studios with the Most Points (through 1969):

  1. MGM  –  3100
  2. United Artists  –  2450
  3. 20th Century-Fox  –  2250
  4. Warner Bros  –  2100
  5. Columbia  –  1850
  6. Paramount  –  1700
  7. RKO  –  1000
  8. Universal  –  300
  9. First National  –  150
  10. Rank / Two Cities  /  Embassy  –  100

Best Director

alec-guinness-and-director-david-lean-during-production-of-lawrence-of-arabia-1962There would be no dominant director in the 60’s like George Stevens and Billy Wilder dominated the 50’s.  Robert Wise would win Best Director twice and several other winners would earn a second nomination.  Arthur Penn, however, would be the only director to earn three nominations and he would lose them all.  Federico Fellini and Richard Brooks would be the oddities, as both would earn two nominations and fail to earn Picture nominations either time.

Seven directors who had been nominated in the 50’s would win Oscars this decade.  That won’t be the case this time.  Of the 40 different directors nominated this decade, only six of them will even earn a nomination in the 70’s and only George Roy Hill will win an Oscar.  The only other director nominated this decade who will go on to win an Oscar later on is Sydney Pollack.  Though all of them would make films in the 70’s, this decade sees the final Oscar nominations for such greats as William Wyler, Billy Wilder, Elia Kazan, George Cukor and Alfred Hitchcock.

As was the case in the 50’s, the Directors make better choices than were made for Best Picture.  In 1964, the five films would be the same (with Picture earning a higher score).  In 1962, Picture would actually score over 10 points higher.  But in the rest of the years, Director has a higher score, most notably in 1963 (27 points) and 1968 (35 points).  Remember that in those two years alone the directors were nominating films like Hud, 8 1/2, The Battle of Algiers and 2001 while the Best Picture nominees included Cleopatra, How the West Was Won and Funny Girl.

  • Best Year:  1963
  • Worst Year:  1966
  • Best Winner:  David Lean  (Lawrence of Arabia)
  • Worst Winner:  Robert Wise  (The Sound of Music)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Arthur Penn  (Bonnie and Clyde)
  • Worst Nominee:  Frank Perry  (David and Lisa)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Sam Peckinpah  (The Wild Bunch)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  7.1
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.2
  • Score for the Decade:  61.0

Top 5 in Points for the Decade:

  1. Robert Wise  –  180
  2. David Lean  –  135
  3. Fred Zinnemann  –  135
  4. Mike Nichols  –  135
  5. Arthur Penn  /  John Schlesinger  –  135

note:  Penn would be the only director earn three nominations in the decade.

Top 10 in Points (through 1969):

  1. William Wyler  –  675
  2. Billy Wilder  –  450
  3. Frank Capra  –  405
  4. John Ford  –  405
  5. David Lean  –  360
  6. Fred Zinnemann  –  360
  7. George Stevens  –  315
  8. Elia Kazan  –  315
  9. Clarence Brown  –  270
  10. George Cukor  –  270

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Sam Peckinpah  (The Wild Bunch)
  2. Akira Kurosawa  (Throne of Blood)
  3. Ingmar Bergman  (The Virgin Spring)
  4. Orson Welles  (Chimes at Midnight)
  5. Akira Kurosawa  (Ikiru)

note:  This list is almost the same as the previous decade – Welles, Bergman and Kurosawa (twice).  If it had been Kubrick for Spartacus instead of Peckinpah it would have been the same.

Best Writing:

After finishing 1st in the 40’s and 2nd in the 50’s, Billy Wilder ties for 3rd in this decade, earning his final Oscar and one other nomination.  Wilder would finish with 600 points, which wouldn’t be surpassed until 2005.  Robert Bolt, known more as a playwright, wins consecutive Oscars for Dr. Zhivago and A Man for All Seasons (adapted from his own play) after earning a previous nomination for Lawrence of Arabia.  Like Michael Wilson, the #1 writer in the 50’s, Bolt will never earn another Oscar nomination.  In 2nd place would be writer-director Richard Brooks, winning an Oscar in 1960 for Elmer Gantry (but failing to be nominated for Best Director) and then earning back-to-back Director and writing nominations in 1966 and 1967 without earning a Best Picture nomination either time.

Stanley Kubrick would earn two nominations; the second he would lose to Mel Brooks.  Foreign nominees would continue to flourish in this decade; Fellini would earn two nominations, Bergman would earn a nomination and Divorce Italian Style and A Man and a Woman would both win Oscars.  The single nominee would continue in this decade; again over 100 screenwriters would earn just one nomination during the decade, including Vladimir Nabokov, Neil Simon and directors Robert Rossen, Elia Kazan, John Cassavetes, Roman Polanski, Sam Peckinpah, Luchino Visconti and Costa-Gavras.

Best Screenplay Based on Material From Another Medium

This category would keep this name all the way through the decade (and until 1974).  It would have a much better decade than in the 50’s, bouncing back up nine points, with no year below 54 (the previous decade had five years at 50 or below).  But there would only be two really good years – 1966 and 1967, with scores of 90.3 and 86.7.  The winners are generally strong.  Three of them are my #1 choice and three more are my #2.  Only two fail to make my nominees and they’re the only two not to be among the best of the nominees in their years – Judgment at Nuremberg (16th in year, 5th among nominees) and Becket (21st in year, 4th among nominees).

  • Best Year:  1966
  • Worst Year:  1964
  • Best Winner:  The Lion in Winter
  • Worst Winner:  Becket
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Dr. Strangelove
  • Worst Nominee:  David and Lisa
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Chimes at Midnight
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  5.6
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.2
  • Score for the Decade:  58.7

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Chimes at Midnight
  2. The Virgin Spring
  3. The Cranes are Flying
  4. One, Two, Three
  5. The Pawnbroker

Best Story and Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen / Best Story and Screenplay Based on Material Not Previously Published or Produced 

The former name of the category lasts all the way until 1969, when it finally changes.  The latter title will last simply the one year and change again in 1970.

This decade is marginally better than the previous one and I mean marginally – it’s a .2 point increase.  Only two years earn a score above 66 and only 1968, with a score of 87.1, earns above a 77.  Meanwhile, two years score below a 42.

The winners continue their streak of mediocrity from the late 50’s.  After giving the Oscar to the weakest Oscar nominee three times in the second half of the 50’s, the Academy does it three more times in the first eight years of the 60’s.  Only two winners win the Nighthawk (the last two) and only two more finish in 2nd.  The winners in 1963 (How the West Was Won) and 1964 (Father Goose) are particularly bad, not even making my Top 20.

  • Best Year:  1968
  • Worst Year:  1963
  • Best Winner:  The Apartment
  • Worst Winner:  How the West Was Won
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Bonnie and Clyde
  • Worst Nominee:  Never on Sunday
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Ikiru
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  7.3
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.6
  • Score for the Decade:  59.3

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Ikiru
  2. Winter Light
  3. Stray Dog
  4. Persona
  5. Take the Money and Run

Top 5 for Points on the Decade:

  1. Robert Bolt  –  200
  2. Richard Brooks  –  160
  3. Billy Wilder  –  120
  4. William Rose  –  120
  5. I.A.L. Diamond  /  Abby Mann  /  Frederic Raphael  –  120

Top 10 for Points through 1969:

  1. Billy Wilder  –  600
  2. Charles Brackett  –  400
  3. Ben Hecht  –  320
  4. John Huston  –  320
  5. Joseph L. Mankiewicz  –  280
  6. Robert Riskin  –  240
  7. Michael Wilson  –  240
  8. Carl Foreman  –  240
  9. Federico Fellini  –  240
  10. Richard Brooks  –  240

Best Actor

peckThe decade would belong to those who would never win an Oscar – Richard Burton and Peter O’Toole.  O’Toole would give the best performance of the decade and would fail to win.  Burton would be nominated three straight years.  Both of them would lose to John Wayne in one of the worst Oscar choices ever.  Both actors would be nominated four times in this decade without an Oscar to show for it.  Marcello Mastroianni would set a new mark in 1962, becoming the first Foreign language performer to be nominated in this category, while Sidney Poitier will be the first African-American to win the award in 1963.

The winners would not be good choices – not a single one wins the Nighthawk and none of them were even the best of the nominees.  Only three times (Schell, Peck, Scofield) would they even pick the second best performance.  That would culminate in the last two years when the Academy would choose the worst of the nominees each time, nominations that are #19 (Robertson) and #14 (Wayne) on my lists for those years.  Yet, surprisingly, the score for the decade would remain exactly the same as in the 50’s.  They would even have the same kind of range – two scores above 90, two scores below 75, although in this decade no score is below 71.

  • Best Year:  1966
  • Worst Year:  1962
  • Best Winner:  Gregory Peck  (To Kill a Mockingbird)
  • Worst Winner:  Cliff Robertson  (Charly)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Peter O’Toole  (Lawrence of Arabia)
  • Worst Nominee:  Anthony Quinn  (Zorba the Greek)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Takashi Shimura  (Ikiru)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  6.5
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  3.1
  • Score for the Decade:  80.8

note:  –  Actually Robertson was also the Worst Nominee, followed by Wayne.  Quinn is the Worst Nominee Who Didn’t Win.

Ikiru5Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Takashi Shimura  (Ikiru)
  2. Gunnar Bjornstrand  (Winter Light)
  3. Orson Welles  (Chimes at Midnight)
  4. William Holden  (The Wild Bunch)
  5. George C. Scott  (Dr. Strangelove)

Top 5 Points of the Decade (Actor only):

  1. Richard Burton  –  140
  2. Peter O’Toole  –  140
  3. Spencer Tracy  –  105
  4. Burt Lancaster  –  105
  5. Paul Newman  /  Rod Steiger  /  Rex Harrison  –  105

note:  Burton and O’Toole lead in the decade without an Oscar.  They both earn four noms and compete against each other in 1969 and in 1964, where they are even nominated for the same film.

Top 10 Points through 1969  (Actor only):

  1. Spencer Tracy  –  385
  2. Laurence Olivier  –  280
  3. Fredric March  –  245
  4. Gary Cooper  –  245
  5. Laurence Olivier  –  210
  6. Marlon Brando  –  210
  7. Paul Muni  –  210
  8. James Stewart  –  210
  9. Gregory Peck  –  210
  10. Ronald Colman  /  Richard Burton  –  175

Best Actress

The 11 Best Actress winners in the decade (remember, 1968 had a tie) are a much more mixed bag than in the 50’s.  Four of them win the Nighthawk and are among the Top 10 performances in the decade (Neal, Christie, Taylor’s second and Hepburn’s second).  Four of them finish either 2nd or 3rd in their years and are lower down in the decade list (Bancroft, Andrews, Streisand, Smith).  The other three aren’t even good enough to earn Nighthawk nominations (Taylor’s first, Loren, Hepburn’s first).

Melina Mercouri would become the first Foreign language performer to ever earn an acting nomination at the Oscars in 1960; she would be followed the next year by Sophia Loren who would be the first performer to ever win.  Sadly, I think both of them were not particularly good choices (especially Mercouri).

This was the best of the acting categories in the 50’s.  In this decade, the score drops just a little, but is beaten by Supporting Actress which improves dramatically.  Once again, the Biggest Snubs list is dominated by Foreign films.  In fact, for the second straight decade, the top two on the list are from Ingmar Bergman films (and I can pretty much guarantee that will be the case again in the 70’s because of Cries and Whispers).

Only two actresses manage three Oscar nominations during the decade – Katharine Hepburn (who wins twice) and Anne Bancroft (who wins once).

  • Best Year:  1966  *
  • Worst Year:  1962
  • Best Winner:  Elizabeth Taylor  (Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf)
  • Worst Winner:  Elizabeth Taylor  (Butterfield 8)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Audrey Hepburn  (Breakfast at Tiffany’s)
  • Worst Nominee:  Sophia Loren  (Marriage Italian Style)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Harriet Andersson  (Through a Glass Darkly)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  3.4
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.3
  • Score for the Decade:  82.2

*  –  1966 actually had the second weakest group of nominees, but since the Score is based off how good the nominees are as compared to how good the nominees they should have chosen are, this year earns the highest score, an astounding 97.2.

anderssonFive Biggest Snubs:

  1. Harriet Andersson  (Through a Glass Darkly)
  2. Liv Ullmann  (Persona)
  3. Tatyana Samojlova  (The Cranes are Flying)
  4. Catherine Deneuve  (Belle de Jour)
  5. Catherine Deneuve  (Repulsion)

Top 5 Points for the Decade  (Actress only):

  1. Katharine Hepburn  –  175
  2. Elizabeth Taylor  –  140
  3. Anne Bancroft  –  140
  4. Sophia Loren  –  105
  5. Julie Andrews  /  Patricia Neal  –  105

note:  These six account for eight of the eleven Best Actress awards in the decade.  Hepburn and Taylor both had two wins, with Hepburn earning a third nom.  Bancroft has one win with two other noms.  The other three each have one win and a nom.  The three winners not here are Maggie Smith (an additional nomination, but in Supporting), Julie Christie and Barbra Streisand (no other noms).

Top 10 Points through 1969  (Actress only):

  1. Katharine Hepburn  –  490
  2. Bette Davis  –  420
  3. Greer Garson  –  280
  4. Norma Shearer  –  245
  5. Ingrid Bergman  –  245
  6. Elizabeth Taylor  –  245
  7. Olivia de Havilland  –  210
  8. Susan Hayward  –  210
  9. Deborah Kerr  –  210
  10. Audrey Hepburn  –  210

note:  Kate Hepburn finally takes over the lead from Bette Davis in 1968.  Olivia de Havilland is the only actress on this list who had any supporting nominations (though Bergman would earn one in the 70’s).

Best Supporting Actor

georgechakirisbernardoPeter Ustinov is the Anthony Quinn of this decade, winning two Oscars that I don’t think he should have won.  The only other actor with more than one nomination is Peter Falk.

Like with Actor and Actress, the score is almost unchanged from the decade before, dropping a mere .6.  But that’s an average.  In the 50’s, the range was tighter, never falling below 60 and only going above 88 once (and that was only a 91.4).  But here, twice the score dips below 60 (with a low of 54.3 in 1964) and twice goes above 95 (with a high of 97.1 in 1961). And the winners are much worse – almost twice as high as the decade before (though barely changed among the nominees).  I didn’t agree with the winner once during the entire decade and only three times did the winner come in 2nd, though twice (1960 and 1969) they at least chose the best nominee.

This is reflected in my best performances – of the seven performances I rate the highest, four were nominated but lost and the other three weren’t even nominated.

  • Best Year:  1961
  • Worst Year:  1964
  • Best Winner:  George Chakiris  (West Side Story)
  • Worst Winner:  Peter Ustinov  (Topkapi)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Omar Sharif  (Lawrence of Arabia)
  • Worst Nominee:  Chill Wills  (The Alamo)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Sterling Hayden  (Dr. Strangelove)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  4.9
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.3
  • Score for the Decade:  73.4

017-dr-strangelove-theredlistFive Biggest Snubs:

  1. Sterling Hayden  (Dr. Strangelove)
  2. Anthony Hopkins  (The Lion in Winter)
  3. Henry Fonda  (Once Upon a Time in the West)
  4. Peter Sellers  (Lolita)
  5. Toshiro Mifune  (High and Low)

Top Points of the Decade  (Supporting only):

  1. Peter Ustinov  –  120
  2. 8 actors at 60, one win each
  3. 1 actors at 60, two noms (Peter Falk)

Top 10 Points through 1969 (Supporting only):

  1. Walter Brennan  –  210
  2. Peter Ustinov  –  150
  3. Charles Coburn  –  120
  4. Claude Rains  –  120
  5. Anthony Quinn  –  120
  6. Arthur Kennedy  –  120
  7. Gig Young  –  120
  8. Thomas Mitchell  –  90
  9. Charles Bickford  –  90
  10. Walter Huston  /  Edmund Gwenn  /  Karl Malden  /  Hugh Griffith  /  Edmond O’Brien  –  90

Top 5 Points of the Decade (combined):

  1. Richard Burton  –  140
  2. Peter O’Toole  –  140
  3. Peter Ustinov  –  120
  4. Spencer Tracy  –  105
  5. Burt Lancaster  /  Paul Newman  /  Rod Steiger  /  Rex Harrison  –  105

Top 10 Points through 1959  (combined):

  1. Spencer Tracy  –  385
  2. Laurence Olivier  –  280
  3. Fredric March  –  245
  4. Gary Cooper  –  245
  5. Walter Brennan  –  210
  6. Marlon Brando  –  210
  7. Paul Muni  –  210
  8. James Stewart  –  210
  9. Gregory Peck  –  210
  10. Richard Burton  –  205

Best Supporting Actress

shirleyThere would be no one like Thelma Ritter in the 50’s, as no actress would receive more than two Supporting nominations.  The nominees are better this decade but the winners are weaker.  The score of 84.1 is the highest to date for any acting category in any decade and half the years in the decade would have a score of 90 or above.  However, for the first time in this category there are three straight years where the winner isn’t among the two best nominees (63-65) and 64 and 65 are the first back-to-back years where the Oscar winner doesn’t earn a Nighthawk nomination.  The average winner ranks at 3.1 among all films whereas in the fifties not a single Oscar winner ranked lower than 3rd.

  • Best Year:  1960
  • Worst Year:  1967
  • Best Winner:  Shirley Jones  (Elmer Gantry)
  • Worst Winner:  Shelley Winters  (A Patch of Blue)
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Edith Evans  (Tom Jones)
  • Worst Nominee:  Kay Medford  (Funny Girl)
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Bibi Andersson  (Persona)
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  3.1
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.2
  • Score for the Decade:  84.1

bibi-andersson-in-persona-Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Bibi Andersson  (Persona)
  2. Shelley Winters  (Lolita)
  3. Hermione Gingold  (The Music Man)
  4. Moira Shearer  (Peeping Tom)
  5. Arlene Francis  (One, Two, Three)

note:  1962 is such a stacked year that Shearer, who doesn’t make my Top 5 in that year, makes the Top 5 Snubs over Nighthawk nominees from 1960, 1961, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1968 and 1969 – in fact, over my #2 in both 1965 and 1969.

Top Points in the Decade  (Supporting only):

  1. Estelle Parsons  –  90
  2. Ruth Gordon  –  90

note:  Parsons and Gordon are the only actresses with more than 60 points on the decade just in supporting.  There are 11 actresses tied with 60 points – the other 8 Oscar winners, Shirley Knight, Edith Evans and Joyce Redman.

Top 10 Points through 1969  (Supporting only):

  1. Thelma Ritter  –  180
  2. Ethel Barrymore  –  150
  3. Anne Revere  –  120
  4. Celeste Holm  –  120
  5. Claire Trevor  –  120
  6. Agnes Moorehead  –  120
  7. Shelley Winters  –  120
  8. 11 actresses tied  –  90

note:  Ritter and Moorehead are the only actresses in the Top 7 without an Oscar while Winters is the only one with two.  Of the 11 actresses with 90 points, nine of them have an Oscar while the two without are Angela Lansbury and Gladys Cooper.

Top 5 Points in the Decade  (combined):

  1. Katharine Hepburn  –  175
  2. Elizabeth Taylor  –  140
  3. Anne Bancroft  –  140
  4. Sophia Loren  –  105
  5. Julie Andrews  –  105
  6. Patricia Neal  –  105

Top 10 Points through 1959  (combined):

  1. Katharine Hepburn  –  490
  2. Bette Davis  –  420
  3. Greer Garson  –  280
  4. Norma Shearer  –  245
  5. Ingrid Bergman  –  245
  6. Elizabeth Taylor  –  245
  7. Olivia de Havilland  –  240
  8. Susan Hayward  –  210
  9. Deborah Kerr  –  210
  10. Audrey Hepburn  –  210

note:  Kerr is the only actress in the Top 10 without an Oscar.

Best Editing

Best Editing manages to not be the worst Oscar category, but only because of the Black-and-White distinction being carried on for too long.  It is one of five Tech categories with a score less than 40 (including all three Black-and-White categories).  William H. Reynolds, who would win an Oscar (for The Sound of Music, my second worst Winner of the decade) would also earn three other nominations.  He is the only person with more than 75 points during the decade (four editors would win an Oscar and earn another nomination while two would simply earn three nominations).  Personally, I wouldn’t have given Reynolds any nominations, though he will redeem himself in the 70’s by editing The Godfather.

It is extremely difficult to give out the Worst Nominee in this category.  After all, here are some of the bloated, interminable films that managed to be nominated in this category: The Alamo, Mutiny on the Bounty, Cleopatra, Doctor Dolittle, Funny Girl and Hello Dolly.

  • Best Year:  1962
  • Worst Year:  1963
  • Best Winner:  West Side Story
  • Worst Winner:  How the West Was Won
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  The Great Escape
  • Worst Nominee:  Doctor Dolittle
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Bonnie and Clyde
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  6.1
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.8
  • Score for the Decade:  34.1

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Bonnie and Clyde
  2. 2001: A Space Odyssey
  3. Point Blank
  4. The Wild Bunch
  5. A Hard Day’s Night

 

Top in Points for the Decade:

  1. William H. Reynolds  –  125

Top 10 in Points through 1969:

  1. Barbara McLean  –  200
  2. Daniel Mandell  –  200
  3. William Lyon  –  200
  4. Ralph Dawson  –  175
  5. Ralph E. Winters  –  150
  6. Frederic Knudtson  –  150
  7. Robert J. Kern  –  125
  8. Conrad Nervig  –  125
  9. Gene Milford  –  125
  10. Anne Bauchens  –  125
  11. William Hornbeck  –  125
  12. Harold F. Kress  –  125
  13. William H. Reynolds  –  125

Best Cinematography

In 1967, the Academy would finally realize that the Color and Black-and-White distinctions was no longer necessary and would make this one category.  In those final three years, the Academy would do a good job the first year (and also nominate the only black-and-white film in those three years: In Cold Blood) but badly mess up the other two.

Actually, I keep writing that the distinction was kept on too long but that’s really only because the Academy kept insisting on nominating sub-standard Hollywood fare in the Black-and-White category.  The score in the category drops over 10 points from the decade before but that’s mainly because by the 60’s most of the best Cinematography in black-and-white films was coming from overseas, namely in the form of Kurosawa and Bergman films.  My list of Snubs under Black-and-White is actually woefully inadequate.  I made a list of the Top 20 snubs, regardless of color.  On that list, 18 of them were black-and-white and only one was in the English language – Repulsion, which is basically a Foreign film with its minimal dialogue being in English.  The only two color films on the list (both listed below) happen to both be Hollywood films.  All of this is to say that I had to dig a lot deeper for the color snubs than I did for the black-and-white.

Like many of the tech categories, the nominees here would be in flux.  The old Studio System cinematographers were starting to retire.  Of the Top 10 from the 1950’s, only three would make the Top 10 in this decade and those three would only earn a combined three nominations after 1969.  Yet, the younger bunch wasn’t quite here yet.  Of the Top 10 in this decade, only two would make the Top 10 in a later decade.  Of the Top 10 in this decade only Conrad Hall would earn more than three nominations after this decade, although Robert Surtrees, who finishes just outside the Top 10 in this decade was the #1 cinematographer in the 50’s and would be so again in the 70’s.

  • Best Year:  1967
  • Worst Year:  1968
  • Best Winner:  Bonnie and Clyde
  • Worst Winner:  Romeo and Juliet
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  In Cold Blood
  • Worst Nominee:  Doctor Dolittle
  • Most Egregious Snub:  2001: A Space Odyssey
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  10.3
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.67
  • Score for the Decade:  22.3

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. 2001: A Space Odyssey
  2. The Wild Bunch
  3. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
  4. Rosemary’s Baby
  5. Oh! What a Lovely War

 

Black-and-White

  • Best Year:  1966  *
  • Worst Year:  1965
  • Best Winner:  The Hustler
  • Worst Winner:  Ship of Fools
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Psycho
  • Worst Nominee:  Two for the Seasaw
  • Most Egregious Snub:  The Virgin Spring
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  9.0
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.0
  • Score for the Decade:  34.2

*  –  I make this choice based on score.  This year had the best score, but that’s because there was a dearth of great Foreign films that should have been nominated.  Just looking at the five Oscar nominees, this is the 4th best year (out of 7), behind 1960, 1961 and 1962, but because those years had loads of great snubs, 1966 actually has a higher score.

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. The Virgin Spring
  2. Throne of Blood
  3. Winter Light
  4. Stray Dog
  5. Knife in the Water

 

Color

  • Best Year:  1964
  • Worst Year:  1963
  • Best Winner:  Lawrence of Arabia
  • Worst Winner:  Cleopatra
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  The Professionals
  • Worst Nominee:  Butterfield 8
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Ride the High Country
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  2.4
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.3
  • Score for the Decade:  43.0

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Ride the High Country
  2. The Great Escape
  3. Peeping Tom
  4. The Leopard
  5. The Birds

Top 5 in Points for the Decade:

  1. Ernest Laszlo  –  175
  2. Harry Stradling  –  150
  3. Daniel L. Fapp  –  150
  4. Conrad Hall  –  125
  5. six different cinematographers  –  100

Top 10 in Points through 1969:

  1. Leon Shamroy  –  550
  2. Charles Lang  –  450
  3. Harry Stradling  –  400
  4. Joseph Ruttenberg  –  350
  5. George Folsey  –  325
  6. Robert Surtrees  –  300
  7. William V. Skall  –  275
  8. James Wong Howe  –  275
  9. Ray Rennahan  –  250
  10. Arthur Miller   –  250
  11. Victor Milner  –  250
  12. Joseph LaShelle  –  250

Best Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture  /  Best Scoring of a Musical Picture / Best Music – Substationally Original / Best Original Music Score / Best Original Score – For a Motion Picture [Not a Musical] / Best Score of a Musical Picture [Original or Adaptation] / Best Scoring of Music – Adaptation of Treatment

This is the transition decade.  The first three decades would have Alfred Newman in first place every time.  The next four would be dominated by John Williams (who is also currently in first place in this current decade).  But here, Newman is on his way out (just 95 points, finishing in 10th) and John Williams is just getting started (45 points).  The two would actually end up in the same category – Newman would win his final Oscar for Camelot (in the Adaptation or Treatment category) with Williams earning his first nomination in the same category for Valley of the Dolls.  Elmer Bernstein would win the decade with 160 points, the lowest decade-topping score ever.  Of the rest of the Top 10, some would be the fading time for the Studio Era composers (Alex North, Johnny Green, Dimitri Tiomkin, Andre Previn), who would, combined, only earn 120 more points after this decade.  Most of the rest would be the rising stars (Maurice Jarre, Jerry Goldsmith, John Barry) who would all win Oscars after this decade (Barry and Jarre would both actually win multiple Oscars during this decade).

As can be seen from the constantly changing name, the Academy really couldn’t quite decide what to do with these two categories.  They seemed determined to classify Musical scores as different from a regular score, but as the genre declined late in the decade, they seemed to feel the need to change things up.  As a result, we get a year like 1964, where the two categories are Best Music Score – Substantially Original and Best Scoring of Music – Adaptation or Treatment and 1967 where the first category is Best Original Music Score and the second category is the same.  In 1964, Mary Poppins will win the former and lose the latter, with different people credited and in 1967 the same thing will happen with Thoroughly Modern Millie.  How does that work exactly?  This category confusion will continue on after the end of this decade, although we won’t have any more double nominees after 1967.

1960 is the best year in this category by a long way, and in two different ways.  First, it has the highest score – its score of 85.0 is the highest to date (and highest until the 80’s) and only the second time this category had broken 75.  But the score is based off the Academy’s nominees compared to mine – in other words, they chose well among the possibilities.  But they also had the highest score just for the Oscar nominees; with a maximum possibility of 45, this year earns a 34, the first time a year with only five nominees has a score higher than 22, and no other year will break 27 until the 80’s.

Where the category really dropped the ball was in the magnificent partnership of Ennio Morricone with Sergio Leone.  Morricone did absolutely masterful work and that is reflected down below in the Snubs.  It’s a little ironic that another of my biggest snubs is from Elmer Bernstein, who would be the Academy’s top composer for the decade.

 

Dramatic or Comedy Picture / Score

  • Best Year:  1960
  • Worst Year:  1963
  • Best Winner:  Doctor Zhivago
  • Worst Winner:  Thoroughly Modern Millie
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  The Pink Panther
  • Worst Nominee:  Hawaii
  • Most Egregious Snub:  The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  4.2
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.6
  • Score for the Decade:  60.6

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly  (Morricone)
  2. Once Upon a Time in the West  (Morricone)
  3. The Great Escape  (Bernstein)
  4. A Fistful of Dollars  (Morricone)
  5. Dr. No  (Norman)

 

Musical Picture / Adaptation

  • Best Year:  1964
  • Worst Year:  1968
  • Best Winner:  West Side Story
  • Worst Winner:  Song Without End
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  A Hard Day’s Night
  • Worst Nominee:  The Singing Nun
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  1.7
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.7
  • Score for the Decade:  92.6

note:  I’ll be honest here, this is a hard category to judge.  For the first few years these are Musicals, but then they’re “adapted” and how do I judge that?  And later it combines them both which just makes it even more confusing.  That’s why I don’t have any snubs.

Top 5 in Points for the Decade:

  1. Elmer Bernstein  –  160
  2. Alex North  –  125
  3. Johnny Green  –  115
  4. Maurice Jarre  –  110
  5. Dimitri Tiomkin  /  Andre Previn  /  Ernest Gold  /  Jerry Goldsmith  /  John Barry  –  100

Top 10 in Points through 1969:

  1. Alfred Newman  –  1245
  2. Max Steiner  –  700
  3. Morris Stoloff  –  525
  4. Victor Young  –  500
  5. Miklos Rozsa  –  475
  6. Ray Heindorf  –  430
  7. Dimitri Tiomkin  –  425
  8. Franz Waxman  –  350
  9. Johnny Green  –  340
  10. Herbert Stothart  –  300

Best Sound Recording

This is a terrible category in this decade, yet is a big improvement over how it was in the first three decades.  Only twice would this category earn a score of over 50 and neither time would it break 60.  But in all the years prior to this decade it had also only broken 50 twice and never broken 60.  Just like in the 50’s, three films would win the Oscar and the Nighthawk (West Side Story, Lawrence of Arabia, Grand Prix).  But in the 50’s, no other winner made my Top 10 and here one other winner earns a Nighthawk nom and three others make my Top 10.  So that’s much better.

This category loved its Musicals.  At the end of the decade, as Musicals were winding down, nine of the last 15 nominees and the last two winners were Musicals.

The rules over how this category worked would continue to be strange.  Up through 1966, this would go to the head of the studio’s sound department.  Then, in 1967 and 1968, it would go to the studio itself.  Starting in 1969, it finally went to the sound technician.  As a result, no one who received a nomination prior to 1966 would ever receive another nomination.  It would take years before sound designers started making it into the Top 10 and even today fully half the Top 10 list are the old studio sound heads.

  • Best Year:  1966
  • Worst Year:  1963
  • Best Winner:  West Side Story
  • Worst Winner:  Hello, Dolly!
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Bullitt
  • Worst Nominee:  Doctor Dolittle
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Bonnie and Clyde
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  7.6
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.6
  • Score for the Decade:  39.3

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Bonnie and Clyde
  2. 2001: A Space Odyssey
  3. The Wild Bunch
  4. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
  5. The Great Escape

Top 5 in Points in the Decade:

  1. Gordon Sawyer  –  160
  2. Franklin E. Milton  –  140
  3. Fred Hynes  –  120
  4. George Groves  –  120
  5. Waldon O. Watson  –  120

Top 10 in Points through 1969:

  1. Douglas Shearer  –  380
  2. John Livadary  –  360
  3. Nathan Levinson  –  340
  4. Gordon Sawyer  –  320
  5. Thomas T. Moulton  –  280
  6. L. L. Ryder  –  240
  7. E. H. Hansen  –  220
  8. Fred Hynes  –  220
  9. George Groves  –  200
  10. Bernard B. Brown  –  180

Best Interior Decoration

Things were changing as the studio system disappeared.  Of the top six interior decorators in points prior to 1960, one would earn two more nominations (Richard Day), one would earn one more (Lyle Wheeler) and the other four would never again earn an Oscar nomination.  But a new group was rising.  Jack Martin Smith would earn five straight nominations and win three Oscars.  George W. Davis and Henry Grace working together would each earn 10 nominations, including five years in a row and an incredible seven in three years without winning.  Hal Pereira would start the decade with eight nominations in the first four years, concluding a streak of nominations that dated back to 1952; he would earn 11 nominations in the decade without an Oscar.  Sam Comer, working mostly with Pereira, would earn his last Oscar nomination in 1963, concluding a streak that began in 1954.  Walter M. Scott would win three Oscars in the decade and begin a streak of nominations that would last from 1963 to 1970.

I mention Scott last because his streak also extends into the era when the Black-and-White and Color distinctions were finally dropped in 1967.  Though a handful of people have earned three straight nominations, Scott remains the only person since it was reduced to a single category to earn four straight Oscar nominations.

Black-and-White

  • Best Year:  1961
  • Worst Year:  1964
  • Best Winner:  Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf
  • Worst Winner:  Zorba the Greek
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  La Dolce Vita
  • Worst Nominee:  Mister Buddwing
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Lolita
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  6.29
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.28
  • Score for the Decade:  39.9

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Lolita
  2. The Pawnbroker
  3. Throne of Blood
  4. The Three Penny Opera
  5. Ikiru

Color

  • Best Year:  1964
  • Worst Year:  1966
  • Best Winner:  Dr. Zhivago
  • Worst Winner:  Fantastic Voyage
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Mary Poppins
  • Worst Nominee:  The Oscar
  • Most Egregious Snub:  The Leopard
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  3.0
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.42
  • Score for the Decade:  68.2

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. The Leopard
  2. A Man for All Seasons
  3. Irma La Douce
  4. Come Drink With Me
  5. Elmer Gantry

Best Art Direction  (1967-1969)

  • Best Year:  1968
  • Worst Year:  1969
  • Best Winner:  Oliver!
  • Worst Winner:  Camelot
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  2001: A Space Odyssey
  • Worst Nominee:  Gaily, Gaily
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Bonnie and Clyde
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  4.0
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.33
  • Score for the Decade:  68.8

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Bonnie and Clyde
  2. Oh! What a Lovely War
  3. The Lion in Winter
  4. Belle de Jour
  5. The Graduate

Top 10 in Points in the Decade:

  1. Walter M. Scott  –  220
  2. Hal Pereira  –  220
  3. George Davis  –  220
  4. George James Hopkins  –  200
  5. Henry Grace  –  200

Top 10 in Points through 1969:

  1. Cedric Gibbons  –  1020
  2. Edwin B. Willis  –  800
  3. Lyle Wheeler  –  660
  4. Sam Comer  –  600
  5. Thomas Little  –  540
  6. Hans Dreier  –  520
  7. Walter M. Scott  –  520
  8. Richard Day  –  500
  9. Hal Pereira  –  480
  10. George Davis  –  380

Best Special Effects

There is a strong disconnect between this category, as it existed prior to this decade and the works in this decade.  Visual effects had changed and the people who made them changed.  Of the 82 people who had earned an Oscar nomination in this category prior to 1960, only five would earn a nomination in this decade while only L.B. Abbott, who earned a nomination in 1959, would ever earn another nomination after 1969 (he would win several Oscars).  But this decade wasn’t exactly the wave of the future either – 28 people would earn nominations and only eight of them would earn another one after 1969.  There is no top five for the decade because only one person, Eustace Lycett, would earn more than 40 points (he would be nominated for The Absent Minded Professor and win an Oscar for Mary Poppins); a handful of people would earn two nominations but no wins and no other winner would earn another nomination.  Not only would there be no change in the Top 5, the only change in the Top 10 would be that R. A. MacDonald would win an Oscar for The Longest Day and join a long list of people tied for 8th place with 100 points.

The Sci-Fi films had come into their own in the 60’s.  The four Sci-Fi films with the best Visual Effects in the decade all won Oscars (2001, Fantastic Voyage, The Time Machine, Marooned).  2001 was especially notable as it was the only Oscar that Stanley Kubrick ever won.  But while War films were being rewarded (The Guns of Navarone and The Longest Day both won Oscars), Fantasy films were being ignored, most notably Jason and the Argonauts, Mysterious Island and 3 Worlds of Gulliver, all of which had amazing stop-motion work by Ray Harryhausen and the first two of which had better Visual Effects than the actual Oscar winners.

  • Best Year:  1968
  • Worst Year:  1967
  • Best Winner:  2001: A Space Odyssey
  • Worst Winner:  Cleopatra
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  The Birds
  • Worst Nominee:  Tobruk
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Jason and the Argonauts
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  1.8
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.1
  • Score for the Decade:  54.1

 

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Jason and the Argonauts
  2. Jack the Giant Killer
  3. Mysterious Island
  4. 3 Worlds of Gulliver
  5. Goldfinger

Top 5 in Points through 1969:

  1. A. Arnold Gillespie  –  300
  2. Gordon Jennings  –  220
  3. Fred Sersen  –  200
  4. Farciot Edouart  –  180
  5. Douglas Shearer  /  John P. Fulton  –  160

Best Sound Effects

Prior to 1962, there was one category called Special Effects.  In 1963, that category would split into two: Special Visual Effects and Sound Effects.  That category would exist for five years, then go away (with three special award exceptions) until 1982.  There would only be two nominees in each year, and in spite of the massive overlap once the award was revived in the eighties, only one film nominated for Visual Effects was also nominated for Sound Effects (Fantastic Voyage, which won the former and lost the latter).  There is no point in talking about points – no one won more than one Oscar and the only people even nominated more than once both lost twice, so no one had more than 40 points; aside from that, no one nominated during these years would be nominated once it was made into a regular category.

  • Best Year:  1966
  • Worst Year:  1963
  • Best Winner:  Grand Prix
  • Worst Winner:  It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Fantastic Voyage
  • Worst Nominee:  The Lively Set
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Bonnie and Clyde
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  3.0
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.0
  • Score for the Decade:  45.7

Best Costume Design

Edith Head.  That’s it.  It’s still all about Edith Head.  She earns 225 points in this decade (which is actually 75 fewer points than she earned in the 50’s), a good 75 more than any other costume designer and more than all but four other designers have earned in their entire careers.  Her streak would finally end at 19 straight years, as she would fail to earn a nomination in 1967 for the first time in the category’s existence.  There would be some interesting curiosities.  First, though she would earn 14 nominations in the decade, she would only win the Oscar once, taking home the Black & White Oscar in 1960 (for Facts of Life, my choice of worst Black & White winner of the decade).  Second, after winning that Oscar, she would fail to be nominated in the Black & White category the next year for the first time since 1952.  Third, though she was known less for color films earlier in the category’s existence, after 1954, every remaining year where there was a split category (1955, 1956, 1959-1966), she would be nominated in the Color category.  Fourth, in spite of all her numerous nominations (29 in all), only once was she nominated against herself – in the Black & White category in 1963.

There is some irony that in 1967, when the categories were combined, that she would fail to get nominated for the first time.  That would seem to indicate that her costumes were overrated (some definitely were), but since she had been getting nominations in the more competitive Color category every year, that would argue against that idea.  Either way, her streak was finally over and she would fail again to be nominated in 1968, though she would earn a nomination in 1969 (and several in the 70’s).  But she wasn’t the only one on her way out – of the Top 10 in points going into 1967, four of them would never earn another Oscar nomination, two of them would earn only one more and only Head would win another Oscar.  It was a changeover.

This is again a very weak decade for the Academy in the Black-and-White Costume Design category.  Most of the truly worthy films were foreign films that were completely ignored, so instead the Academy was giving awards to The Facts of Life.  They did reward two Fellini films, but The Night of the Iguana and Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, while great films, didn’t deserve awards for their costumes.  It wasn’t so much that the winners were bad (though the nominees often were) as that the category no longer needed to exist.  But the Color category was much better.  No winner of the Color category ranks lower than 3rd overall among all films.  The two most egregious snubs are also both surprising, as they were both Best Picture winners: Tom Jones and Lawrence of Arabia.  Once they combined the categories they did better with nominations but worse with winners.

Black-and-White

  • Best Year:  1965
  • Worst Year:  1964
  • Best Winner:  8 1/2
  • Worst Winner:  The Facts of Life
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  The Virgin Spring
  • Worst Nominee:  Kisses for My President
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Throne of Blood
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  5.0
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  2.1
  • Score for the Decade:  33.0

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Throne of Blood
  2. Ivan the Terrible Part II
  3. The Hidden Fortress
  4. The Life of Oharu
  5. Harakiri

Nominations I Haven’t Seen:

  • The Stripper  (1963)
  • A House is Not a Home  (1964)

Color

  • Best Year:  1964
  • Worst Year:  1963
  • Best Winner:  Doctor Zhivago
  • Worst Winner:  The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Mary Poppins
  • Worst Nominee:  The Oscar
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Tom Jones
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  1.7
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  1.4
  • Score for the Decade:  74.7

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Tom Jones
  2. Lawrence of Arabia
  3. Come Drink With Me
  4. Chushingura
  5. Kwaidan

Best Costume Design (1967-1969)

  • Best Year:  1967
  • Worst Year:  1969
  • Best Winner:  Anne of the Thousand Days
  • Worst Winner:  Romeo and Juliet
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Bonnie and Clyde
  • Worst Nominee:  Gaily, Gaily
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Oh, What a Lovely War
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  6.7
  • Average Winner Rank among Nominees:  3.0
  • Score for the Decade:  61.5

Five Biggest Snubs:

  1. Oh, What a Lovely War
  2. The Charge of the Light Brigade
  3. War and Peace
  4. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
  5. The Wild Bunch

Nominations I Haven’t Seen

  • The Happiest Millionaire  (1967)

Top 5 Points in the Decade:

  1. Edith Head  – 225
  2. Irene Sharaff  –  150
  3. Bill Thomas  –  135
  4. Dorothy Jeakins  –  90
  5. Jean Louis  /  Danilo Donati   /  Piero Gherardi  –  75

Top 10 Points through 1969:

  1. Edith Head  –  570
  2. Charles LeMaire  –  285
  3. Irene Sharaff  –  285
  4. Jean Louis  –  225
  5. Dorothy Jeakins  –  195
  6. Helen Rose  –  180
  7. Walter Plunkett  –  165
  8. Bill Thomas  –  135
  9. Gile Steele  –  120
  10. Mary Wills  –  105

Best Song

This category, so good in the 40’s, dropped precipitously in the 50’s and stays just as low this decade for the same reasons that it dropped in the 50’s.  The first is that Oscars.org, beginning with 1953, lists eligible films, and to a certain extent, eligible songs.  That means from there on I can determine when a song (for the most part) was eligible.  The second reason for the drop in the 50’s was that the Academy stopped nominating Disney songs – that’s not much of an issue here as there were only three Disney animated films in the decade and the only song from those films that lands higher than third in a year, “The Bare Necessities” at least did earn an Oscar nomination.  But the third reason, the introduction of rock and roll, is a big, big deal here. In the late 50’s, the Academy missed out on a number of Elvis songs.  There are still missing Elvis songs here, in 1960 and 1961, but the biggest problem is the massive amount of Beatles songs eligible in 1964 and 1965, none of which earned nominations.

Of my Top 20 eligible songs in the decade *, three of them won the Oscar (“Moon River”, “Chim Chim Cher-ee”, “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head”) and one of them was nominated (“The Bare Necessities”).  That leaves 16 songs, 3 of which are from A Hard Day’s Night and 4 of which are from Help and two more are Elvis songs (also, 4 of them are from Mary Poppins, so they’re not all rock and roll).  For the record, 9 of my Top 20 songs are from 1964.

Sammy Cahn continues to be the Academy’s favorite lyricist.  His nominations in 1960 and 1961 would finish his record streak of 8 straight years with nominations.  He would then win the Oscar in 63 and earn two nominations in 64.  That would give him nominations in 15 of the 17 years from 1948 to 1964 for 18 nominations (and 4 wins) in that stretch.  He would also earn nominations in 1967 and 1968.  James Van Heusen would be the composer for all his nominations in the 60’s.  For the record, the only Cahn / Van Heusen song during the decade to earn a Nighthawk nomination is “Teamwork” from Road to Hong Kong, which doesn’t earn an Oscar nom.  Mack David and Henry Mancini would earn an Oscar nom together in 1961 for “Bachelor in Paradise”.  But, then they would both earn nominations from 62 to 65 without working together again.  Mancini would win Oscars in both 61 and 62 but David would have the longer streak, adding a nomination in 66.  That would be David’s final nomination and he would end his career with 8 nominations and no Oscars.  Paul Francis Webster would be the other top Oscar lyricist of the decade, winning the Oscar in 65 (for the weakest winner in the decade) and earn 6 other nominations.

* – A quick footnote on eligible songs.  I decided, given the list at Oscars.org and given that it uses a truncated version in the film, not to include “Mrs Robinson” as an eligible song.  If I had, it would be the most egregious snub as it is my #1 song for the entire decade.  Not #1 song from a film.  My #1 song for the entire decade.

 

  • Best Year:  1966
  • Worst Year:  1960
  • Best Winner:  “Moon River” from Breakfast at Tiffany’s
  • Worst Winner:  “The Shadow of Your Smile” from The Sandpiper
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  “The Bare Necessities” from The Jungle Book  *
  • Worst Nominee:  “A Time for Love” from An American Dream
  • Most Egregious Snub:  “Help” from Help
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  6.0
  • Average Winner Rank among nominees:  2.1
  • Score for the Decade:  40.1

*  –  This is the second decade in a row where the best nominee that didn’t win is also the only song nominated from a Disney animated film.

 

5 Most Egregious Snubs:

  1. “Help” from Help
  2. “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” from Mary Poppins
  3. “A Hard Day’s Night” from A Hard Day’s Night
  4. “Can’t Help Falling in Love” from Blue Hawaii
  5. “You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away” from Help

Nominations I Haven’t Seen:

  • “Banning” from Banning  (1967)

Top 5 in Points in the Decade:

  1. Sammy Cahn  –  80
  2. James Van Heusen  –  80
  3. Paul Francis Webster  –  80
  4. Henry Mancini  –  80
  5. Johnny Mercer  –  70

Top 5 in Points through 1969:

  1. Sammy Cahn  –  280
  2. Johnny Mercer  –  200
  3. James Van Heusen  –  180
  4. Paul Francis Webster  –  170
  5. Harry Warren  –  140
  6. Ned Washington  –  130
  7. Leo Robin  –  110
  8. Jule Styne  –  110
  9. Mack Gordon  –  100
  10. Harold Arlen  –  100

Best Foreign Film

The Academy would do a fairly good job in the decade with nominating and awarding the films in this category; it would be the submission process, as usual, that is flawed.  There are 69 films in the decade I rate at ***.5 or higher (high enough for my own awards) and only 7 of them were submitted to the Academy and not nominated (4 of those were in 1966).  But 9 of the 10 winners are on that list and another 10 nominees and the two best Foreign Films of the decade (The Virgin Spring and Z) both won the Oscar.

Four countries submitted a film every year: France, Italy, Japan and Sweden.  All of them would be nominated at least five times and though Japan would not win an Oscar the other three would win two apiece.  Only four other countries would get nominated at least half the time they submitted: Czechoslovakia (4 noms in 6 submissions and the only other country to win multiple awards), Yugoslavia (4 noms in 7 submissions), the USSR (2 noms and a win in 3 submissions) and Algeria (the best – 1 submission, which was nominated and won).  In fact, of the 14 countries to submit less than 5 films, the USSR and Algeria were the only ones to earn nominations, let alone wins.  Only two countries would submit more than 5 times and fail to earn a nomination – Egypt (0 for 6) and India (0 for 8).

There would be several odd streaks in the decade.  After being nominated the first four years of the category, from 56-59, West Germany would fail to earn any nominations in this decade.  Mexico would be nominated three years in a row (60-62) and then not again until 1975.  Czechoslovakia would actually be nominated four years in a row (65-68) and then not again until 1986.  But Italy would have the biggest streak of the decade with five years in a row (62-66), though it would have a bigger streak in the 70’s.

Fellini would win his third Oscar but Bergman would be the only director to win two Oscars in the decade.  Claude Lelouch and Vittorio de Sica would both win an Oscar and then lose with their second nominated film.  1961 would be the strange year – until 1984 it would be the only year where neither France nor Italy was nominated.

Though only 60% of the submissions would come from Europe, 78% of the nominations went to Europe.  The statistics are down below.

  • Best Year:  1960
  • Worst Year:  1966
  • Best Winner:  The Virgin Spring
  • Worst Winner:  Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow
  • Best Nominee That Didn’t Win:  Knife in the Water
  • Worst Nominee:  The Red Lanterns
  • Most Egregious Snub:  Persona
  • Average Winner Rank at Nighthawks:  5.7  *
  • Average Winner Rank among nominees:  1.7
  • Score for the Decade:  74.4  *

*  –  The Score for the Decade and Winner Rank at Nighthawks are based only on submitted films.  Though I think the Academy’s rules are stupid, I can only grade them on what was allowed within the rules.  So, in 1963, the grade does not reflect the absence of Winter Light which was not submitted but it does reflect the absence of Ivan’s Childhood which was submitted but not nominated.  Full lists of what was submitted can be found here.

5 Most Egregious Snubs:

  1. Persona
  2. Ivan’s Childhood
  3. Shame
  4. Last Year at Marienbad
  5. Hunger

5 Best Films not submitted:

  1. Winter Light
  2. Jules and Jim
  3. Harakiri
  4. Belle de Jour
  5. High and Low

5 Worst Submissions (in relation between the film not submitted and the film submitted):

explanation:  On a 100 point scale, the biggest difference between the film that was submitted and what I thought was the best film from that country.  It only works if I have seen the submitted film.  For the list above, blame goes on the Academy’s system.  For this list, the blame goes on the submitting country.  There are 37 times in this decade where a country submitted a film, I’ve seen that film, and I think a different film should have been submitted.  In 19 of those times, the point difference is less than 10. There are another 10 times where it is between 10 and 19.  There are three more times between 20 and 23.  These last five are the most egregious.

  1. 1969 Italy  –  Fellini Satyricon submitted instead of The Damned  (44 pts)
  2. 1963 Japan  –  Twin Sisters of Kyoto submitted instead of High and Low  (30 pts)
  3. 1962 Japan  –  Being Two Isn’t Easy submitted instead of Harakiri  (28 pts)
  4. 1961 Japan  –  Immortal Love submitted instead of Yojimbo  (28 pts)
  5. 1960 France  –  La Verite submitted instead of Shoot the Piano Player  (27 pts)

note:  Three of these submitted films were nominated (Twin Sisters of Kyoto, Immortal Love, La Verite).  The irony is that The Damned still isn’t good enough to make my nomination list, but it is far better than Satyricon, which, in my opinion was the worst film submitted during the decade.  France had the worst track record – it was on the list three more times with a difference in the teens and three more with a single digit difference.  The other irony is my #6 – Winter Light passed over for The Silence (23 point difference) because they were both Bergman films.

Nominations I Haven’t Seen:

  • Harry and the Butler  (1961)
  • Dear John  (1965)
  • Portrait of Chieko  (1967)

Top 5 Countries in Points during the Decade:

  1. France  /  Italy  –  180
  2. Sweden  –  140
  3. Czechoslovakia  –  120
  4. Japan  –  100

Top 4 Countries in Points through 1969 (not including Special Awards):

  1. France  –  300
  2. Italy  –  300
  3. Sweden  –  140
  4. Japan  –  120
  5. Czechoslovakia  –  120

Top 5 Countries in Points through 1969  (including Special Awards):

  1. France  –  420
  2. Italy  –  380
  3. Japan  –  240
  4. Sweden  –  140
  5. Czechoslovakia  –  120

Submission Statistics:

  • Western Europe: 41 submissions, 17 nominees, 4 winners
  • Eastern Europe:  20 submissions, 9 nominees, 3 winners
  • Scandinavia:  19 submissions, 6 nominees, 2 winners
  • Balkans:  17 submissions, 7 nominees
  • Europe (total):  97 submissions, 39 nominees, 9 winners
  • Asia:  39 submissions, 6 nominees (all but 1 from Japan)
  • South America:  12 submissions, 1 nominee (Brazil)
  • North America:  7 submissions (all from Mexico), 3 nominees
  • Africa:  7 submissions, 1 nominee, 1 winner

Other Categories

 

The following categories didn’t yet exist by 1969: Animated Film.

Best Animated Film would take until this century to become a category.  Like with the 1950’s, the only Animated Films in the decade I think were good enough to earn this award were the Disney films (101 Dalmations, The Sword in the Stone, The Jungle Book).  None of the other 20 Animated Films I have seen from this decade rank better than a mid-range ***, so it’s not that bad of an omission in this decade.

By Year

1960

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1960
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  # 59
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  3.90
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  4.00
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.67
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  51.0
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  77.9
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  46.2
  • Total Nominee Score:  55.0

1961

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1961
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  31 (best to date)
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  2.33 (best to date)
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  2.40 (best to date)
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.57
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  62.4
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  89.3
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  57.4
  • Total Nominee Score:  65.0

1962

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1962
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  35
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  3.38
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  3.50
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.57
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  62.4
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  75.5
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  51.0
  • Total Nominee Score:  58.8

1963

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1963
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  84
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  6.86
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  7.00
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.95
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  41.7
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  87.0
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  29.2
  • Total Nominee Score:  45.5

1964

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1964
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  46
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  6.83
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  6.86
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  2.59
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  58.7
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  71.4
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  54.0
  • Total Nominee Score:  56.8

1965

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1965
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  71
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  8.45
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  6.76
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  2.45
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  48.1
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  75.0
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  50.0
  • Total Nominee Score:  54.0

1966

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1966
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  43
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  3.09
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  3.14
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.68
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  79.0 (new high to date)
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  91.7
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  54.0
  • Total Nominee Score:  68.9 (new high to date)

1967

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1967
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  57
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  4.84
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  4.94
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  2.21
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  72.2
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  82.4
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  50.7
  • Total Nominee Score:  66.0

1968

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1968
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  77
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  8.21
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  6.72
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  2.06
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  60.4
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  72.2
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  55.3
  • Total Nominee Score:  61.2

1969

  • Nighthawk Awards for 1969
  • Best Picture:  Reviews of the films can be found here.
  • Best Picture Rank:  #  48
  • Winners Average (with Picture):  4.22
  • Winners Average (without Picture):  4.06
  • Winners Average Among Nominees:  1.94
  • Nominee Score (P-D-S):  57.8
  • Nominee Score  (Acting):  77.9
  • Nominee Score  (Tech Categories):  43.9
  • Total Nominee Score:  57.7
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