September 2013


A nice quiet hangover moment in The Thin Man (1934).

A nice quiet hangover moment in The Thin Man (1934).

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category.  Films in blue were nominated.  We finally get to 12 categories this year with the addition of Editing, Original Score and Original Song.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. The Thin Man
  2. It Happened One Night
  3. Vampyr
  4. The Gay Divorcee
  5. Death Takes a Holiday

(more…)

"I made myself comfortable on the living-room sofe.  We had the afternoon papers sent up.  Morelli, it seemed, had shot me - twice for one of the papers and three times for another - when I tried to arrest him for Julia Wolf's murder, and I was too near death to see anybody or to be moved to a hospital."  The Thin Man, p 38.

“I made myself comfortable on the living-room sofa. We had the afternoon papers sent up. Morelli, it seemed, had shot me – twice for one of the papers and three times for another – when I tried to arrest him for Julia Wolf’s murder, and I was too near death to see anybody or to be moved to a hospital.” The Thin Man, p 38.

My Top 7:

  1. The Thin Man
  2. It Happened One Night
  3. Vampyr
  4. The Gay Divorcee
  5. Of Human Bondage
  6. Death Takes a Holiday
  7. Twentieth Century

Note:  Only seven?  Yes, only seven.  I’ve seen 79 films from 1934, at least 30 of which were adapted.  But many of them don’t rise above the mundane and some of them are just downright bad.  A list of notable films that didn’t make the grade are down at the bottom, as usual.  And really, this year is all about three films, one of which (Vampyr) is questionable as to whether it belongs here (records of its first U.S. screenings are sketchy). (more…)

Loretta Young and Polly Ann Young in a publicity shot for The White Parade (1934).

Loretta Young and Polly Ann Young in a publicity shot for The White Parade (1934).

And now I have reviews for every film ever nominated at the Oscars for Best Picture except The Patriot, which is sadly lost.  The review of The White Parade can now be found in the original Best Picture: 1934 post.  As with East Lynne, every post from the last few years that mentions The White Parade has also been adjusted.

The Best Picture 1930-31 post, originally posted three and a half years ago is now on the front page, complete with a review of East Lynne.  I have also adjusted any post from the last three years that mentions East Lynne to reflect its new rating (**).  I’ll give it a few days and then do the same for The White Parade.