The rabbits prepare to defend their warren in Watership Down (1978) - the best animated film since the 50's

1970  –  1979

Total Films I’ve Seen:  755

Films That Make the Top 5 in Any Category:  38

Best Film Not to Make the Top 5 in Any Category:  Mean Streets

Film of the Decade:  The Godfather

Worst Film of the Decade:  Caligula

Worst Best Picture Nominee of the Decade:  Love Story

Worst Film of the Decade Made by a Top 100 Director:  The Brood

The Non-Nighthawk Awards:

Top 10 Films of the 1970’s  (Top 1000):

  1. The Godfather –  #6
  2. The Godfather Part II –  #15
  3. Taxi Driver –  #26
  4. Apocalypse Now –  #35
  5. Chinatown –  #36
  6. The Mirror –  #68
  7. Nashville –  #74
  8. Amarcord –  #76
  9. Barry Lyndon –  #84
  10. Aguirre: The Wrath of God –  #85

Top 10 Films of the 1970’s  (Award Points):

  1. Kramer vs. Kramer –  2101
  2. One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest –  1858
  3. Annie Hall –  1838
  4. Cabaret –  1762
  5. Network –  1613
  6. All the President’s Men –  1551
  7. The Deer Hunter –  1511
  8. Julia –  1473
  9. Nashville –  1445
  10. Chinatown –  1430

The Godfather Part II - the highest regarded film of the decade by the Oscars

Top 10 Films of the 1970’s  (Academy Award Points):

  1. The Godfather Part II –  560
  2. Patton –  540
  3. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest –  515
  4. Cabaret –  510
  5. Kramer vs. Kramer –  510
  6. The Sting –  490
  7. Network –  490
  8. The Deer Hunter –  470
  9. The French Connection –  465
  10. Star Wars –  455

Top 10 Films of the 1970’s  (Box Office Gross):

  1. Star Wars –  $307.26 mil
  2. Jaws –  $260.00 mil
  3. The Exorcist –  $193.00 mil
  4. Grease –  $159.97 mil
  5. The Sting –  $156.00 mil
  6. National Lampoon’s Animal House –  $141.60 mil
  7. Superman –  $134.21 mil
  8. The Godfather –  $133.69 mil
  9. Smokey and the Bandit –  $126.73 mil
  10. Blazing Saddles –  $119.50 mil

Top 10 Films of All-Time  (Top 1000 – through 1979):

  1. Citizen Kane
  2. Vertigo
  3. Rules of the Game
  4. 2001: A Space Odyssey
  5. 8 1/2
  6. The Godfather
  7. The Searchers
  8. The Seven Samurai
  9. Singin in the Rain
  10. The Battleship Potemkin

Top 10 Films of All-Time  (Award Points – through 1979):

  1. Kramer vs. Kramer –  2101
  2. A Man for all Seasons –  1923
  3. One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest –  1858
  4. Annie Hall –  1838
  5. Cabaret –  1762
  6. The Bridge on the River Kwai –  1699
  7. Tom Jones –  1620
  8. Network –  1613
  9. All the President’s Men –  1551
  10. On the Waterfront –  1512

Top 10 Films of All-Time  (Academy Award Points – through 1979):

  1. From Here to Eternity –  675
  2. Gone with the Wind –  670
  3. Ben-Hur –  660
  4. On the Waterfront –  645
  5. All About Eve –  625
  6. Mrs. Miniver –  610
  7. West Side Story –  610
  8. Going My Way –  585
  9. My Fair Lady –  565
  10. The Godfather Part II –  560

Top 10 Films of All-Time  (Box Office Gross – through 1979):

  1. Star Wars –  $307.26 mil
  2. Jaws –  $260.00 mil
  3. The Exorcist –  $193.00 mil
  4. Gone with the Wind –  $189.52 mil
  5. Grease –  $159.97 mil
  6. The Sound of Music –  $158.67 mil
  7. The Sting –  $156.00 mil
  8. National Lampoon’s Animal House –  $141.60 mil
  9. Superman –  $134.21 mil
  10. The Godfather –  $133.69 mil

Nighthawk Awards:

Best Animated Film:

  1. Watership Down
  2. The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  3. The Aristocats

note:  The first time a non-Disney film wins Best Animated Film of the Decade.

Best Foreign Film:

  1. Cries and Whispers
  2. The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
  3. Aguirre – the Wrath of God
  4. Day for Night
  5. Scenes from a Marriage

Best Original Song:

  1. “The Rainbow Connection”  (The Muppet Movie)
  2. “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life”  (Monty Python’s The Life of Brian)
  3. “Knockin on Heaven’s Door”  (Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid)
  4. “Suicide is Painless”  (M*A*S*H)
  5. “The Rose”  (The Rose)

The Best Makeup category didn't exist at the Oscars until 1981, but Star Wars would have won. It has the best of the decade.

Best Makeup:

  1. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
  2. Alien
  3. The Exorcist
  4. Barry Lyndon
  5. All That Jazz

Best Costume Design:

  1. Barry Lyndon
  2. Chinatown
  3. The Godfather
  4. The Godfather Part II
  5. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope

Best Sound Editing:

  1. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
  2. Alien
  3. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  4. The French Connection
  5. Jaws

Best Visual Effects:

  1. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
  2. Close Encounters of the Third Kind
  3. Alien
  4. Superman
  5. Star Trek: The Motion Picture

Best Art Direction:

  1. The Godfather
  2. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
  3. Barry Lyndon
  4. All the President’s Men
  5. Alien

Best Sound:

  1. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
  2. The French Connection
  3. Alien
  4. Apocalypse Now
  5. Jaws

Best Original Score:

  1. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
  2. Superman
  3. Star Trek: The Motion Picture
  4. Jaws
  5. The Godfather

Best Cinematography:

  1. The Godfather
  2. Cries and Whispers
  3. Barry Lyndon
  4. Apocalypse Now
  5. Chinatown

Best Editing:

  1. The Godfather
  2. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
  3. Chinatown
  4. Cries and Whispers
  5. A Clockwork Orange

Best Supporting Actress (Comedy):

  1. Maggie Smith  (California Suite)
  2. Lee Grant  (Shampoo)
  3. Shirley MacLaine  (Being There)
  4. Meryl Streep  (Manhattan)
  5. Sally Kellerman  (M*A*S*H)

Best Supporting Actress  (Drama):

  1. Harriet Andersson  (Cries and Whispers)
  2. Valentina Cortese  (Day for Night)
  3. Kari Sylwan  (Cries and Whispers)
  4. Meryl Streep  (Kramer vs. Kramer)
  5. Ellen Burstyn  (The Last Picture Show)

Two of the best supporting performances of the decade: Harriet Andersson and Kari Sylwan in Cries and Whispers (1972)

Best Supporting Actress:

  1. Harriet Andersson  (Cries and Whispers)
  2. Valentina Cortese  (Day for Night)
  3. Kari Sylwan  (Cries and Whispers)
  4. Meryl Streep  (Kramer vs. Kramer)
  5. Ellen Burstyn  (The Last Picture Show)

Best Supporting Actor  (Comedy):

  1. Michael Caine  (California Suite)
  2. Joel Grey  (Cabaret)
  3. Jack Warden  (Shampoo)
  4. Paul Dooley  (Breaking Away)
  5. Melvyn Douglas  (Being There)

Best Supporting Actor  (Drama):

  1. Al Pacino  (The Godfather)
  2. Robert De Niro  (The Godfather Part II)
  3. Alec Guinness  (Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope)
  4. Jason Robards  (All the President’s Men)
  5. Robert Duvall  (Apocalypse Now)

Best Supporting Actor:

  1. Al Pacino  (The Godfather)
  2. Robert De Niro  (The Godfather Part II)
  3. Alec Guinness  (Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope)
  4. Jason Robards  (All the President’s Men)
  5. Robert Duvall  (Apocalypse Now)

Best Actress  (Comedy):

  1. Diane Keaton  (Annie Hall)
  2. Liza Minnelli  (Cabaret)
  3. Ruth Gordon  (Harold and Maude)
  4. Marsha Mason  (The Goodbye Girl)
  5. Diana Ross  (Lady Sings the Blues)

Best Actress  (Drama):

  1. Liv Ullmann  (Cries and Whispers)
  2. Ingrid Thulin  (Cries and Whispers)
  3. Faye Dunaway  (Chinatown)
  4. Glenda Jackson  (Sunday Bloody Sunday)
  5. Louise Fletcher  (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)

Two of the best lead performances of the decade: Liv Ullmann and Ingrid Thulin in Cries and Whispers (1972)

Best Actress:

  1. Diane Keaton  (Annie Hall)
  2. Liv Ullmann  (Cries and Whispers)
  3. Ingrid Thulin  (Cries and Whispers)
  4. Faye Dunaway  (Chinatown)
  5. Glenda Jackson  (Sunday Bloody Sunday)

Best Actor  (Comedy):

  1. Peter Sellers  (Being There)
  2. Roy Scheider  (All That Jazz)
  3. Woody Allen  (Annie Hall)
  4. Richard Dreyfuss  (The Goodbye Girl)
  5. George C. Scott  (The Hospital)

Best Actor  (Drama):

  1. Jack Nicholson  (Chinatown)
  2. Marlon Brando  (Last Tango in Paris)
  3. Robert De Niro  (Taxi Driver)
  4. Jack Nicholson  (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)
  5. Al Pacino  (Dog Day Afternoon)
  6. Al Pacino  (Serpico)
  7. Gene Hackman  (The French Connection)

note:  There are 7 nominees because of the double nominations for Nicholson and Pacino.

Best Actor:

  1. Jack Nicholson  (Chinatown)
  2. Marlon Brando  (Last Tango in Paris)
  3. Robert De Niro  (Taxi Driver)
  4. Jack Nicholson  (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)
  5. Al Pacino  (Dog Day Afternoon)
  6. Al Pacino  (Serpico)
  7. Gene Hackman  (The French Connection)

note:  There are 7 nominees because of the double nominations for Nicholson and Pacino.

Best Original Screenplay  (Comedy):

  1. Annie Hall
  2. The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
  3. Manhattan
  4. Monty Python and the Holy Grail
  5. American Graffiti

Best Original Screenplay  (Drama):

  1. Chinatown
  2. Cries and Whispers
  3. Scenes from a Marriage
  4. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
  5. Network

Best Original Screenplay:

  1. Chinatown
  2. Cries and Whispers
  3. Annie Hall
  4. The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
  5. Scenes from a Marriage

Best Adapted Screenplay  (Comedy):

  1. M*A*S*H
  2. Being There
  3. Young Frankenstein
  4. Heaven Can Wait
  5. The Twelve Chairs

Best Adapted Screenplay  (Drama):

  1. The Godfather
  2. All the President’s Men
  3. A Clockwork Orange
  4. The Godfather Part II
  5. Breaker Morant

Best Adapted Screenplay:

  1. The Godfather
  2. All the President’s Men
  3. A Clockwork Orange
  4. M*A*S*H
  5. Being There

Best Director  (Comedy):

  1. Woody Allen  (Annie Hall)
  2. Robert Altman  (M*A*S*H)
  3. Luis Buñuel  (The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie)
  4. Bob Fosse  (All That Jazz)
  5. Woody Allen  (Manhattan)
  6. Bob Fosse  (Cabaret)
  7. George Lucas  (American Graffiti)

note:  There are 7 directors because of the two nominations for Allen and Fosse.

Best Director  (Drama):

  1. Francis Ford Coppola  (The Godfather)
  2. Roman Polanski  (Chinatown)
  3. Ingmar Bergman  (Cries and Whispers)
  4. Stanley Kubrick  (A Clockwork Orange)
  5. George Lucas  (Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope)

Best Director:

  1. Francis Ford Coppola  (The Godfather)
  2. Roman Polanski  (Chinatown)
  3. Ingmar Bergman  (Cries and Whispers)
  4. Stanley Kubrick  (A Clockwork Orange)
  5. George Lucas  (Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope)

Best Picture  (Comedy):

  1. Annie Hall
  2. M*A*S*H
  3. Manhattan
  4. The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
  5. American Graffiti

Best Picture  (Drama):

  1. The Godfather
  2. Chinatown
  3. Cries and Whispers
  4. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
  5. A Clockwork Orange

Best Picture:

  1. The Godfather
  2. Chinatown
  3. Cries and Whispers
  4. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
  5. Annie Hall

Robert Duvall and Al Pacino in The Godfather - the best film of the decade

Films That Earn Best of Decade Nominations:

  • The Godfather
    • Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actor, Editing, Cinematography, Original Score, Art Direction, Costume Design
  • Chinatown
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actor, Actress, Editing, Cinematography, Costume Design
  • Cries and Whispers
    • Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Actress, Actress, Supporting Actress, Supporting Actress, Editing, Cinematography, Foreign Film
  • Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
    • Picture, Director, Supporting Actor, Editing, Original Score, Sound, Art Direction, Visual Effects, Sound Editing, Costume Design, Makeup
  • Annie Hall
    • Picture, Original Screenplay, Actress
  • A Clockwork Orange
    • Director, Adapted Screenplay, Editing
  • All the President’s Men
    • Adapted Screenplay, Art Direction
  • M*A*S*H
    • Adapted Screenplay, Original Song
  • The Godfather Part II
    • Adapted Screenplay, Supporting Actor
  • The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
    • Original Screenplay, Foreign Film
  • Scenes from a Marriage
    • Original Screenplay, Foreign Film
  • Last Tango in Paris
    • Actor
  • Taxi Driver
    • Actor
  • One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest
    • Actor
  • Dog Day Afternoon
    • Actor
  • The French Connection
    • Actor, Sound, Sound Editing
  • Serpico
    • Actor
  • Sunday Bloody Sunday
    • Actress
  • Apocalypse Now
    • Supporting Actor, Cinematography, Sound
  • Day for Night
    • Supporting Actress, Foreign Film
  • Kramer vs. Kramer
    • Supporting Actress
  • The Last Picture Show
    • Supporting Actress
  • Barry Lyndon
    • Cinematography, Art Direction, Costume Design, Makeup
  • Superman
    • Original Score, Visual Effects
  • Star Trek: The Motion Picture
    • Original Score, Visual Effects
  • Jaws
    • Original Score, Sound, Sound Editing
  • Alien
    • Sound, Visual Effects, Sound Editing, Makeup
  • Close Encounters of the Third Kind
    • Visual Effects, Sound Editing
  • The Exorcist
    • Makeup
  • All That Jazz
    • Makeup
  • The Muppet Movie
    • Original Song
  • Monty Python’s The Life of Brian
    • Original Song
  • Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid
    • Original Song
  • The Rose
    • Original Song
  • Aguirre – the Wrath of God
    • Foreign Film
  • Watership Down
    • Animated Film
  • The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
    • Animated Film
  • The Aristocats
    • Animated Film

Best Years for Each Category of the Nighthawk Awards:

  • Animated Film:  none  –  only three films qualify and they are from three different years
  • Foreign Film:  1972
    • Cries and Whispers, The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, Solyaris, I Love You Rosa, State of Siege
  • Original Song:  1979
    • “The Rainbow Connection”, “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life”, “The Rose”, “Moving Right Along”, “Love on the Run”
  • Makeup:  1979
    • Alien, All That Jazz, Nosferatu, Monty Python’s The Life of Brian, Apocalypse Now
  • Costume Design:  1974
    • Chinatown, The Godfather Part II, Murder on the Orient Express, The Great Gatsby, The Three Musketeers
  • Sound Editing:  1979
    • Alien, Apocalypse Now, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, 1941, Moonraker
  • Visual Effects:  1979
    • Alien, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, The Black Hole, Moonraker, Apocalypse Now
  • Art Direction:  1974
    • Chinatown, The Godfather Part II, Young Frankenstein, Murder on the Orient Express, The Great Gatsby
  • Sound:  1973
    • The Exorcist, Serpico, Enter the Dragon, The Day of the Jackal, Mean Streets –  hon. men.  –  The Sting
  • Original Score:  1979
    • Star Trek: The Motion Picture, 1941, Woyzeck, The Muppet Movie, Alien
  • Cinematography:  1973
    • Cries and Whispers, The Exorcist, Last Tango in Paris, Mean Streets, Serpico
  • Editing:  1974
    • Chinatown, Don’t Look Now, The Godfather Part II, The Conversation, Day for Night –  hon. men.  –  Young Frankenstein
  • Supporting Actress:  1979
    • Meryl Streep  (Kramer vs. Kramer)
    • Shirley MacLaine  (Being There)
    • Meryl Streep  (Manhattan)
    • Barbara Barrie  (Breaking Away)
    • Jane Alexander  (Kramer vs. Kramer)
    • Meryl Streep  (The Seduction of Joe Tynan)
    • Eva Mattes  (Woyzeck)
    • note:  there are 7 nominee because of the 3 nominations for Meryl Streep
  • Supporting Actor:  1972
    • Al Pacino  (The Godfather)
    • Robert Duvall  (The Godfather)
    • Joel Grey  (Cabaret)
    • James Caan  (The Godfather)
    • Richard Castellano  (The Godfather)
    • hon. men.  –  John Cazale  (The Godfather)
  • Actress:  1973
    • Liv Ullmann  (Cries and Whispers)
    • Ingrid Thulin  (Cries and Whispers)
    • Ellen Burstyn  (The Exorcist)
    • Joanne Woodward  (Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams)
    • Claire Bloom  (A Doll’s House)
  • Actor:  1974
    • Jack Nicholson  (Chinatown)
    • Al Pacino  (The Godfather Part II)
    • Erland Josephson  (Scenes from a Marriage)
    • Gene Hackman  (The Conversation)
    • Dustin Hoffman  (Lenny)
    • hon. men.  –  Albert Finney  (Murder on the Orient Express)
    • hon. men.  –  Martin Sheen  (Badlands)
  • Original Screenplay:  1974
    • Chinatown, Scenes from a Marriage, Day for Night, Blazing Saddles, The Conversation –  hon. men.  –  Badlands
  • Adapted Screenplay:  1971
    • A Clockwork Orange, The French Connection, The Last Picture Show, McCabe & Mrs. Miller, The Garden of the Finzi-Continis
  • Director:  1973
    • Cries and Whispers, Mean Streets, The Exorcist, Serpico, Last Tango in Paris –  hon. men.  –  American Graffiti
  • Picture:  1973
    • Cries and Whispers, Mean Streets, The Exorcist, American Graffiti, Serpico –  hon. men.  –  The Sting

Cinematographer of the Decade:

Gordon Willis

This is one of the blackest eyes on the history of the Academy Awards.  In the 1970’s, Gordon Willis earns 7 Nighthawk nominations and wins two of them.  But it took until 1983 for the Academy to finally even give him a nomination.  But look at his list of credits for this decade: Klute, The Godfather, The Godfather Part II, The Parallax View, All the President’s Men, Annie Hall, Interiors, Comes a Horseman and Manhattan.  The evidence seems to clearly speak for itself.

Composer of the Decade:

John Williams

Though Jerry Goldsmith wins two Nighthawk Awards (for Chinatown and Star Trek) and four other nominations (Patton, Tora! Tora! Tora!, The Omen, Alien), he pales in comparison to John Williams.  He won 3 Oscars among his 11 nominations during the decade and received nominations in 7 of the 10 years.  He composed three of the most iconic scores of all-time (Jaws, Star Wars, Superman), not to mention the brilliant scores for Close Encounters and 1941 as well as solid scores for The Poseidon Adventure, Earthquake, Sugarland Express, Family Plot and Dracula.

Writer of the Decade:

Woody Allen

This almost went to Ingmar Bergman again.  He wins two Nighthawk Awards (Cries and Whispers, Autumn Sonata), gets a 2nd place (Scenes from a Marriage) and a 3rd (Face to Face).  But Allen also gets two wins (Annie Hall, Manhattan), a 2nd place (Interiors – second to Bergman for Autumn Sonata) and a 3rd (Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex), but also adds two 5th place finishes (Sleeper and Love and Death).  Woody’s awards haul for the decade: an Oscar, two BAFTAs, LAFC, NSFC, two NYFC and a WGA award (among 5 nominations).

Meryl Streep in one of her great 1979 roles: Manhattan

Supporting Actress of the Decade:

Meryl Streep

She didn’t even make her film debut until 1977, but she made up for it quickly.  In 1978 she came in 2nd place in the Nighthawk Awards for The Deer Hunter (and earned an Oscar nomination).  Then in 1979 she won basically every award – for groups like the Globes and Academy that cite a specific performance she won it for Kramer vs. Kramer, but the critics awarded it for the body of work that also included Manhattan and The Seduction of Joe Tynan.

Supporting Actor of the Decade:

Robert Duvall

His Oscar would come for Best Actor in 1983 and he would only earn two nominations in the 70’s (for The Godfather and Apocalypse Now).  But, in fact, he deserved to win for Apocalypse Now and deserved nominations for M*A*S*H, The Godfather Part II and Network.  Add in his small but solid work in The Conversation and he starred in a stunning 6 Best Picture nominees in the decade.

Actress of the Decade:

Liv Ullmann

Jane Fonda was great in the decade and won 2 Oscars and finished with 3 consecutive nominations.  But Ullmann was just flat-out amazing.  She was nominated twice in the decade – a true rarity for a Foreign Language star (and probably would have gotten a third if Scenes from a Marriage had been Oscar eligible).  But look at this as well: 4 Globe noms (and a win), and wins from LA, the NSFC (two), the NBR (two) and the NYFC (three).  She wins the Nighthawk Award for Cries and Whispers (and second best of the decade), comes in second for both The Emigrants and Scenes from a Marriage and earns Nighthawk nominations for Face to Face and Autumn Sonata.

Actor of the Decade:

Jack Nicholson

This is close between Nicholson and Pacino.  Both got Oscar nominations (and Nighthawk Awards) early on (Jack for Five Easy Pieces, Al for The Godfather).  Then they competed against each other in three straight Best Actor races (Jack winning the Oscar in 75, Al winning the Nighthawk in 73 and Jack winning in 74 and 75).  Then they were pretty much done for the rest of the decade.  Pacino left films for 4 years, returning for another Oscar and Nighthawk nomination in And Justice for All while Jack did some decent work in mediocre films.  Of course, in the eighties, they diverged, with Jack picking up numerous nominations (and another Oscar) while Al’s film career tanked.  But here in the seventies, Jack comes out a little ahead, namely because Al’s first win was for Supporting, because Jack wins three Nighthawk Awards and for his other great performances – Carnal Knowledge and The King of Marvin Gardens.

Francis Ford Coppola during one of his calmer moments while filming Apocalypse Now (1979)

Director of the Decade:

Francis Ford Coppola

Bergman was great – but directed one bad film (Serpent’s Egg).  Woody Allen was great, with no bad films.  But Coppola only directed four films in the decade and they finish at 1, 8, 11 and 27.  You can’t really top that – especially when his first film of the decade was in the small list of contenders for the greatest film ever made.

The Top 100 Movies of the 1970’s:

  1. The Godfather (1972, dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
  2. Chinatown (1974, dir. Roman Polanski)
  3. Cries and Whispers (1972, dir. Ingmar Bergman)
  4. Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (1977, dir. George Lucas)
  5. Annie Hall (1977, dir. Woody Allen)
  6. A Clockwork Orange (1971, dir. Stanley Kubrick)
  7. M*A*S*H (1970, dir. Robert Altman)
  8. The Godfather Part II (1974, dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
  9. All the President’s Men (1976, dir. Alan J. Pakula)
  10. Alien (1979, dir. Ridley Scott)
  11. Apocalypse Now (1979, dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
  12. Mean Streets (1973, dir. Martin Scorsese)
  13. Jaws (1975, dir. Steven Spielberg)
  14. The Exorcist (1973, dir. William Friedkin)
  15. Breaker Morant (1979, dir. Bruce Beresford)
  16. The French Connection (1971, dir. William Friedkin)
  17. The Last Picture Show (1971, dir. Peter Bogdanovich)
  18. Dog Day Afternoon (1975, dir. Sidney Lumet)
  19. Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977, dir. Steven Spielberg)
  20. McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971, dir. Robert Altman)
  21. Manhattan (1979, dir. Woody Allen)
  22. The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972, dir. Luis Buñuel)
  23. Aguirre – the Wrath of God (1972, dir. Werner Herzog)
  24. Day for Night (1973, dir. Francois Truffaut)
  25. Scenes from a Marriage (1973, dir. Ingmar Bergman)
  26. Network (1976, dir. Sidney Lumet)
  27. The Conversation (1974, dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
  28. American Graffiti (1973, dir. George Lucas)
  29. Taxi Driver (1976, dir. Martin Scorsese)
  30. Sleuth (1972, dir. Joseph L. Mankiewicz)
  31. Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975, dir. Peter Weir)
  32. All That Jazz (1979, dir. Bob Fosse)
  33. The Deer Hunter (1978, dir. Michael Cimino)
  34. Badlands (1973, dir. Terrence Malick)
  35. Cabaret (1972, dir. Bob Fosse)
  36. Serpico (1973, dir. Sidney Lumet)
  37. Midnight Express (1978, dir. Alan Parker)
  38. Being There (1979, dir. Hal Ashby)
  39. The Sting (1973, dir. George Roy Hill)
  40. One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975, dir. Milos Forman)
  41. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975, dir. Terry Gilliam  /  Terry Jones)
  42. Kramer vs. Kramer (1979, dir. Robert Benton)
  43. Solyaris (1972, dir. Andrei Tarkovsky)
  44. The Man Who Would Be King (1975, dir. John Huston)
  45. Korol Lir (1971, dir. Grigori Kozintsev)
  46. Last Tango in Paris (1972, dir. Bernardo Bertolucci)
  47. Five Easy Pieces (1970, dir. Bob Rafelson)
  48. Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971, dir. John Schlesinger)
  49. Tess (1979, dir. Roman Polanski)
  50. Autumn Sonata (1978, dir. Ingmar Bergman)
  51. Young Frankenstein (1974, dir. Mel Brooks)
  52. Amarcord (1974, dir. Federico Fellini)
  53. The Garden of the Finzi-Continis (1971, dir. Vittorio de Sica)
  54. The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976, dir. Clint Eastwood)
  55. Blazing Saddles (1974, dir. Mel Brooks)
  56. Breaking Away (1979, dir. Peter Yates)
  57. Deliverance (1972, dir. John Boorman)
  58. Face to Face (1976, dir. Ingmar Bergman)
  59. Watership Down (1978, animated)
  60. Barry Lyndon (1975, dir. Stanley Kubrick)
  61. Interiors (1978, dir. Woody Allen)
  62. Harold and Maude (1971, dir. Hal Ashby)
  63. Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973, dir. Sam Peckinpah)
  64. Lenny (1974, dir. Bob Fosse)
  65. Don’t Look Now (1973, dir. Nicholas Roeg)
  66. That Obscure Object of Desire (1977, dir. Luis Buñuel)
  67. Patton (1970, dir. Franklin J. Schaffner)
  68. The Parallax View (1974, dir. Alan J. Pakula)
  69. Enter the Dragon (1973, dir. Robert Clouse)
  70. The Hospital (1971, dir. Arthur Hiller)
  71. Heaven Can Wait (1978, dir. Warren Beatty  /  Buck Henry)
  72. The Ascent (1977, dir. Larisa Shepitko)
  73. Love on the Run (1979, dir. Francois Truffaut)
  74. Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion (1970, dir. Elio Petri)
  75. The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973, dir. Peter Yates)
  76. Carrie (1976, dir. Brian De Palma)
  77. The Sunshine Boys (1975, dir. Herbert Ross)
  78. The Muppet Movie (1979, dir. James Frawley)
  79. Monty Python’s The Life of Brian (1979, dir. Terry Jones)
  80. The Mystery of Kasper Hauser (1975, dir. Werner Herzog)
  81. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974, dir. Sam Peckinpah)
  82. And Justice for All (1979, dir. Norman Jewison)
  83. The Twelve Chairs (1970, dir. Mel Brooks)
  84. Walkabout (1971, dir. Nicholas Roeg)
  85. The Day of the Jackal (1973, dir. Fred Zinnemann)
  86. The Marriage of Maria Braun (1979, dir. Rainier Werner Fassbinder)
  87. Shampoo (1975, dir. Hal Ashby)
  88. Klute (1971, dir. Alan J. Pakula)
  89. Three Days of the Condor (1975, dir. Sydney Pollock)
  90. Battles Without Honor or Humanity (1973, dir. Kinju Fukasaku)
  91. The Chess Players (1977, dir. Satyajit Ray)
  92. Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore (1974, dir. Martin Scorsese)
  93. Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (1974, dir. Rainier Werner Fassbinder)
  94. Murder on the Orient Express (1974, dir. Sidney Lumet)
  95. The Phantom of Liberty (1974, dir. Luis Buñuel)
  96. My Brilliant Career (1979, dir. Gillian Armstrong)
  97. Seven Beauties (1976, dir. Lina Wertmuller)
  98. Love and Death (1975, dir. Woody Allen)
  99. The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh (1977, animated)
  100. Lovers and Other Strangers (1970, dir. Cy Howard)

If things were perfect, we would have 10 films from each year.  Instead, this is how they break down (top 20 in parenthesis):

  • 1970  –  6  (1)
  • 1971  –  11  (4)
  • 1972  –  8  (2)
  • 1973  –  15  (2)
  • 1974  –  13  (2)
  • 1975  –  12  (2)
  • 1976  –  7  (1)
  • 1977  –  7  (3)
  • 1978  –  6  (0)
  • 1979  –  15  (3)

However, since so many of these are Foreign films, the actual Oscar (and Nighthawk) eligibility breaks down like this:

  • 1970  –  5  (1)
  • 1971  –  11  (4)
  • 1972  –  5  (1)
  • 1973  –  12  (3)
  • 1974  –  16  (2)
  • 1975  –  13  (2)
  • 1976  –  8  (1)
  • 1977  –  6  (3)
  • 1978  –  8  (0)
  • 1979  –  13  (2)
  • post-1980  –  3  (1)

The 1970’s become the first decade to have every film in the top 5 be a Best Picture nominee at the Oscars.  In fact, it is isn’t until #10 that we reach a non-nominee.  Also, while the 60’s had 45 black-and-white films, there are only 6 that make the Top 100 here (The Last Picture Show, Manhattan, Korol Lir, Young Frankenstein, Lenny, The Ascent) – only two of which are foreign (whereas the sixties had 10 black-and-white films in the Top 100 just from Bergman and Kurosawa).

We get the best Action film ever made up to this point (The French Connection) and the first non-Disney Animated film, Watership Down – which also becomes the first Fantasy film to make a Top 100 list.  We get far fewer Foreign films (only 22), but Cries and Whispers gets up to #3.  Horror does its best since the 30’s, with 6 in the Top 100 and 3 in the Top 20 (A Clockwork Orange, Jaws, The Exorcist).  Sci-Fi has as many films in the top 20 (3) as it had in all the previous Top 100 lists combined.  Musicals and Westerns finally do fall off with only 2 Musicals (both directed by Bob Fosse) and 3 Westerns.  Stanley Kubrick gets a film in the Top 20 for a third consecutive decade.

For the most part, the decade is good for the Oscars.  Only one year fails to get three nominees into the top 100 and half of them get 4 of them on the list.  All of those years and 1976 make the top 20 all-time, with 1973 the best, finishing at #8 all-time.  Unfortunately, the decade also has 1970, which, in spite of getting 3 in the top 100 also has two of the worst nominees ever and finishes #70 overall.  While none of the previous decades could average better than 50th, the average finish for this decade is 27.9.  Here’s how many nominees from each year made the Top 100 (a whopping 34):

  • 1970  –  3
  • 1971  –  3
  • 1972  –  4
  • 1973  –  4
  • 1974  –  4
  • 1975  –  4
  • 1976  –  3
  • 1977  –  2
  • 1978  –  3
  • 1979  –  4
  • 1980  –  1  (Tess)

Directors with 3 or More Films in the Top 100:

4:

  • Francis Ford Coppola  (1, 8, 11, 27)
  • Ingmar Bergman  (3, 25, 50, 58)
  • Woody Allen  (5, 21, 61, 98)
  • Sidney Lumet  (18, 26, 35, 94)

3:

  • Alan J. Pakula  (9,  68, 88)
  • Martin Scorsese  (12, 29, 92)
  • Luis Buñuel  (22, 66, 95)
  • Bob Fosse  (32, 35, 64)
  • Hal Ashby  (38, 62, 87)
  • Mel Brooks  (51, 55, 83)

note:  Stanley Kubrick makes the top 60 twice with his only two films of the decade.  Roman Polanski and Werner Herzog both make the top 100 twice and just barely miss it a third time (with MacBeth and Nosferatu).  William Friedkin and Steven Spielberg both make the top 20 twice but fail to get a third film even close to the top 100.  After multiple films on the list in the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, neither Akira Kurosawa or David Lean make the list (only combining to make three films in the decade); in the eighties they will both make it back into the Top 20.

Advertisements