A Century of Film


Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer


The Studio

In 1924, Loew’s was one of the most prominent studios in Hollywood.  It had a massive studio chain and with Metro Pictures, a production company that was providing a good share of films to fill them.  But Metro’s films had been slipping and Lee Shubert, whose theater chains were big on stage but less so in Hollywood, happened to be a board member of both Loew’s and Goldwyn Pictures, the studio formed by Samuel Goldwyn but which he had departed in 1922.  Goldwyn wasn’t in great shape and its mascot (Leo the Lion) was better known than most of its stars (the biggest being Will Rogers); a long explanation of Leo’s history as the mascot can be found here.  A merger became imminent but they needed someone better than anyone available at Metro or Goldwyn to run the studio.

Enter Louis B. Mayer who had a strong hand in management and had been making films for his own independent production company.  Loew’s would be the parent company, absorbing both Goldwyn and Mayer’s independent company and the combined new studio, with a large roster of talent and a steady hand at the helm would be christened Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer but would soon be known primarily as MGM. (more…)

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“And now all that is over, and that’s the hardest part.  Today everything is very different.  No more action.  I have to wait around like everyone else.  I’m an average nobody.  I get to live the rest of my life like a schnook.”  (p 284)

My Top 10

  1. GoodFellas
  2. The Grifters
  3. Dances with Wolves
  4. Presumed Innocent
  5. The Hunt for Red October
  6. Reversal of Fortune
  7. White Hunter Black Heart
  8. Misery
  9. Mr. & Mrs. Bridge
  10. Awakenings

note:  Once you get past the top two, it’s not nearly as strong as 1989 but it would hard to be that good.  There is, however, a large number of films on my list outside of the Top 10 (barely making the list but making it nonetheless) which are all listed down at the bottom.

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A Century of Film


The 100 Greatest Actors


Introduction

Much as I did with Actress, this is the list that was obviously coming, the list of the 100 Greatest Film Actors of All-Time. (more…)

So, this is a very different list than the one that will be appearing in the next post as you will already know from the Actress list.  In fact, rather than repeat the entire introduction from that post, I will just say that you should click on that link and read that intro first.  But the key to this list is that this is the favorites list, not the best, so remember that for all the bits about the actor. (more…)

My mom’s copy of the San Francisco Chronicle from July 21, 1969 which I now have, showing the event of the day before.

I haven’t been working much on posts the last week because I’ve got some work to get done on my summer job before I start my new job and because of ComicCon.  Yes, now that I live in San Diego I can finally make it to the annual event that’s geared right towards me.  I don’t have pictures yet (ADDITION – a picture is now down below), but, thanks to Matthew Pearson at the IMDb, I managed to get an invite to the IMDboat on Thursday and got a chance to meet Kevin Smith and get him to sign my Clerks poster (which he was thrilled to learn I bought at his comic shop during mine and V’s honeymoon).  I also got a chance to meet Col Needham and, hilariously, discovered that I have seen over 6000 more films than he has.  I guess what that says is I have more spare time than someone who both founded and has been the CEO of one of the world’s greatest websites.

But I wanted to say something about today since I do have that copy of the San Francisco Chronicle up above.  Also, I wrote a review of First Man when I saw it (in IMAX) which didn’t end up with a Best Picture nomination at the Oscars (idiots) so it hasn’t run yet.  Rather than wait until the 2018 Adapted Screenplay post, if I even continue all of this that long, I decided today was the appropriate day to post it, especially since HBO, with some great planning, starts airing it tonight.  It was my #2 film of 2018 and won seven Nighthawk Awards including Best Director and my review explains why. (more…)

“Now the narrow neck of sand where Shaw was buried with his men is washed by Atlantic storms. St. Gaudens’s monument to Shaw and his men marks a place where the Colonel and his regiment passed by on their way to war.” (p 147)

My Top 10

  1. Glory
  2. Field of Dreams
  3. Born on the Fourth of July
  4. Henry V
  5. My Left Foot
  6. The Little Mermaid
  7. Enemies, a Love Story
  8. Drugstore Cowboy
  9. Batman
  10. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade

note:  A fantastic Top 5 and Top 10 which is pretty much the case for any category in this year.  There’s also some irony to note here in that this is the Adapted Screenplay post but I used to own the novelization of two of these films (although it should be pretty obvious which two).

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A Century of Film

Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress

The Lists

Introduction

I have done two previous posts for A Century of Film, one on Best Actor and one on Best Supporting Actor.  In those two posts, I discussed the history of each award and all the various groups that give out such awards.  I also included all-time lists for points from each group based on my own point system. (more…)