Introduction

This is a companion piece to three different series.  The first is The History of the Academy Awards, in which I covered each category in individual posts.  This was originally done in 2009 (nominees through 2008) and additions were included in 2010 for the 2009 nominees.  You can find links to all of these pieces in each individual category.  I have grouped all of the categories together for the same reason that I did so originally – because most pieces on the Oscars don’t approach the awards through the categories, but through the years.  This specific piece is designed to take a closer look at the decade and how I think the Academy did in those years.

The second series is my Year in Film series.  That is mentioned here because in those pieces I included paragraphs about the Oscars as a whole for each year and included a considerable amount of trivia.  Since I had based my Year in Film series and eligibility as such on the Academy calendar, it all seemed very relevant.  Also, I include various prizes (Worst Oscar, Worst Nomination, Worst Omission, etc) and I didn’t want to repeat myself, so following the links will bring you there.  Those links are at the end of this piece, where I do a brief summation of each year and how the Academy did. (more…)

Advertisements

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category (or Globe, in the Globes section).  Films in blue were nominated.  Films (or directors) in olive are links to earlier posts that I don’t want to have show up in blue and be mistaken for a nominee.  Films with an asterisk (*) were Consensus nominees (a scale I put together based on the various awards) while those with a double asterisk (**) were the Consensus winners.

I’m listing the top 15 in the categories but only the top 5 earn Nighthawk nominations.  I’m only going with the Top 15 because there are 15 **** films and several categories don’t even get that far.  It’s a weak year all around.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. Inglourious Basterds  *
  2. The Hurt Locker  **
  3. A Serious Man  *
  4. Up  *
  5. Broken Embraces
  6. An Education  *
  7. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
  8. Up in the Air  *
  9. A Single Man
  10. District 9  *
  11. The White Ribbon
  12. The Informant
  13. Sin Nombre
  14. Coraline
  15. Revanche

Analysis:  As mentioned above, I went with 15 films because that’s how many **** films there are in this year.  That the Oscars nominated seven of them (as well as my #16 film, Precious) speaks well of their first year with 10 nominees in 66 years. (more…)

A picture taken by my sister-in-law of Santiago Oaks Regional Park before the fire went through it.

While I try to finish my Nighthawk Awards for 2009, I want to point back to my novel sleep now the angels, that I published in full (though in parts) back between October and April.  Part of that is because I am almost done with my Top 250 Songs of the Eighties post (hopefully the third post after this one) and a number of the pieces in that post will reference the novel because I quoted a lot of those songs.  But the other reason is because of the town that I set the novel in.  I created a fictional town called Santiago Oaks, California, set in the hills between Sacramento and Reno, a mixture of Forest Grove, Oregon, where I went to college and aspects of California itself, where I was raised.  The town itself got its name, as I said in the introduction, from a regional park that is now mostly ash and dust thanks to Canyon Fire 2.

Canyon Fire 2, which has been raging in central Orange County, just east of Orange and Villa Park, where I lived from 1981 to 1992, has not been getting the attention that the fires around Santa Rosa and Napa Valley have been because the loss of property has been much smaller and the loss of life, thankfully, seems to be nonexistent.  But, if you go to the most recent article in the Orange Country Register, the house you see burnt to the ground stood just yards from the entrance to Santiago Oaks Regional Park, one of my favorite places.  The fire came closer to my brother and sister-in-law’s house that I am comfortable with, but thankfully missed them.  Still, it took down a large swath of land where I ran a lot of cross country during my years in high school.

“I was hiding under your porch because I love you.” My favorite film dog of all-time.

The 82nd Academy Awards for the film year of 2009.  The nomination were announced on 2 February 2010 and the awards were held on 7 March 2010.

Best Animated Film:  Up

  • Coraline
  • The Fantastic Mr. Fox
  • The Secret of Kells
  • The Princess and the Frog

Most Surprising Omission:  Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs

Best Eligible Film Not Nominated:  Ponyo

Rank (out of 16) Among Best Animated Film Years:  #8

Oscar Score:  87.5

Alternate Oscar Score:  97.2 (more…)

Without doubt, my #1 album of the decade.

Introduction:  I once had the thought of doing a Top 100 Albums of All-Time post.  But, the problem with that is that, aside from the large swaths of music that I don’t listen to that would have earned me crap from various people who like that music (and since this is an 80’s post, I’ll go with Prince fans as an example), there is the fact that since leaving Borders in 2009 (where we sold music) the new music I have listened to (other than a few artists) has gone drastically down.  So, there will never be a post of my Top 100 Albums.  I will give a brief list here though for a few other decades.  Please note that these lists are all studio albums only, no live or compilation albums.  For top examples of live albums or compilation albums from the 80’s, please look at my original 80’s music post. (more…)

“The trick, William Potter, is not minding that it hurts.” That line is nowhere in the book but neither is almost any other line of dialogue in the film.

My Top 10:

  1. Lawrence of Arabia
  2. To Kill a Mockingbird
  3. Jules and Jim
  4. The Manchurian Candidate
  5. Throne of Blood
  6. Lolita
  7. Billy Budd
  8. The Music Man
  9. Sweet Bird of Youth
  10. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

Note:  There are 20 films on my list.  Only one of the other ten is reviewed: #12 – The Miracle Worker while the rest are listed down towards the bottom. (more…)

No one knows how to bring you back around better than Danny Boyle.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category (or Globe, in the Globes section).  Films in blue were nominated.  Films (or directors) in olive are links to earlier posts that I don’t want to have show up in blue and be mistaken for a nominee.  Films with an asterisk (*) were Consensus nominees (a scale I put together based on the various awards) while those with a double asterisk (**) were the Consensus winners.

I’m listing the top 20 in the categories but only the top 5 earn Nighthawk nominations.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. Slumdog Millionaire  **
  2. The Dark Knight
  3. Wall-E  *
  4. Milk  *
  5. Revolutionary Road
  6. Rachel Getting Married
  7. Let the Right One In
  8. I’ve Loved You So Long
  9. Happy-Go-Lucky
  10. The Visitor
  11. In Bruges
  12. Iron Man
  13. Doubt
  14. Burn After Reading
  15. Vicky Cristina Barcelona
  16. A Christmas Tale
  17. The Reader
  18. The Wrestler
  19. Changeling
  20. Paranoid Park

(more…)