Greed, for lack of a better word, is bad.

Greed, for lack of a better word, is bad.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category (or Globe, in the Globes section).  Films in blue were nominated (the Globes still didn’t have nominees).  Films with an asterisk (*) were Consensus nominees (a scale I put together based on the various awards) while those with a double asterisk (**) were the Consensus winner.

Now that we have hit 1948, I will probably do more discussion in the major categories.  That’s because we’ve hit the BAFTAs and we’ve hit the first guild awards (DGA, WGA) and we get to what I call “Consensus” awards – what the various groups decided at the time.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre  **
  2. Hamlet  *
  3. Red River
  4. Force of Evil
  5. Day of Wrath

(more…)

A picture to tide you over.  If you think that's me in front of Army One, the actual helicopter Nixon left in, and that I'm mocking Nixon's goodbye to the White House, well, you're right.  I even wore my Hunter Thompson shirt.

A picture to tide you over. If you think that’s me in front of Army One, the actual helicopter Nixon left in, and that I’m mocking Nixon’s goodbye to the White House, well, you’re right. I even wore my Hunter Thompson shirt.  Yes, on my vacation I went to the Nixon Museum in Yorba Linda.

If you know us personally, you know we’re moving this week.  And that we were on the West Coast last week.  I’ll get to 1948 eventually and hopefully get writing some other things.  But life takes precedence at the moment.

Romance and fantasy come to life in Cocteau's fairy tale.

Romance and fantasy come to life in Cocteau’s fairy tale.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category.  Films in blue were nominated.

This is the second year of the reduced number of nominees in the tech categories at the Oscars – Sound and Art Direction (the name finally changed from Interior Decoration) would have three nominees each with Cinematography and Special Effects only having two each.  It’s the fifth year for the Golden Globes, but there are still no nominees and no distinction between Drama and Comedy – the films marked in red in my Globes section won the Globe.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. La Belle et la bête
  2. Great Expectations
  3. Stairway to Heaven  (A Matter of Life and Death)
  4. Ivan the Terrible Part I
  5. Crossfire

Analysis: A big drop-off from 1946, of course.  But an even bigger one if you want to factor in that the top four films aren’t actually from this year.  This was the year that the films from foreign markets finally started flooding in.  Eleven of my Top 20 films weren’t originally released in this year; nor is that fully reflected in the number of foreign language films, as five of my top 14 are British films released in Britain in earlier years.  And, again, there aren’t a great crop of Comedies (my Best Picture – Comedy winner is my #19 film of the year), so here are the films that follow, in order: Out of the Past, Gentleman’s Agreement, Miracle on 34th Street, L’Atalante, I See a Dark Stranger, Brute Force, I Know Where I’m Going, Brighton Rock, This Happy Breed, Boomerang, Torment, Shoeshine and The Devil’s Envoys. (more…)

The brilliant opening of Children of Paradise.

The brilliant opening of Children of Paradise.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category.  Films in blue were nominated.

This is the first year of the reduced number of nominees in the tech categories at the Oscars – Sound and Interior Decoration would have three nominees each with Cinematography and Special Effects only having two each.  It’s the fourth year for the Golden Globes, but there are still no nominees and no distinction between Drama and Comedy – the films marked in red in my Globes section won the Globe.

Note:  You will see seven films in most categories listed below.  Only the top 5 are my nominees for the year.  But the seven top films of this year are so incredibly good, I decided to list more than my top 5 – in fact, this year sets a new best for Picture, Director, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress, Editing and Cinematography.  In later years, I will probably list my Top 10 in just about all categories, but still only my top 5 will earn nominations.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. Children of Paradise
  2. The Best Years of Our Lives
  3. It’s a Wonderful Life
  4. The Big Sleep
  5. Brief Encounter
  6. Henry V
  7. Notorious

(more…)

In 1944, this would have been the #2 film.  In 1946, it would be the #8 film.  But in 1945, The Lost Weekend is easily the best film of the year.

In 1944, this would have been the #2 film. In 1946, it would be the #8 film. But in 1945, The Lost Weekend is easily the best film of the year.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category.  Films in blue were nominated. This is the last year of the seemingly unlimited number of nominees in most of the tech categories at the Oscars.  It’s the third year of the Golden Globes – there were still no nominees and no distinction between Drama and Comedy, but those films in red in the Globe section won the Globes.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. The Lost Weekend
  2. To Have and Have Not
  3. Spellbound
  4. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
  5. The Story of G.I. Joe

Analysis:  Unlike the year before, this isn’t even a full list of **** films – Joe is a ***.5 film, and not that high a one either.  Joe is the weakest #5 film since 1934 and the total group is the weakest group of 5 since 1931. (more…)

One look at her and Walter Neff was doomed.

One look at her and Walter Neff was doomed.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category.  Films in blue were nominated. This is the start of the 5 Best Picture nominee era at the Oscars, which will last until 2008.  It’s the second year of the Golden Globes – there were still no nominees and no distinction between Drama and Comedy, but those films in red in the Globe section won the Globes.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. Double Indemnity
  2. Gaslight
  3. The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek
  4. Hail the Conquering Hero
  5. Arsenic and Old Lace

Analysis:  This is not a great year, and yet it’s still going to be better than 1945.  These are all **** films, but this is the lowest total for the top 5 since 1937 and it’s the lowest top 10 since 1936.  That’s because this is it for **** films and there are only three ***.5 films: Ministry of Fear, Laura and The Princess and the Pirate and the last two are lower level.  The only years so far with a weaker 6 through 10 are 1931, 1934 and 1936.  Arsenic was actually ready in 1942 but Warners was contractually obligated to wait for the end of the Broadway run and so it becomes the third great comedy here. (more…)

My mom always mentions that Paul Henreid is in Now Voyager.  I then always point out that he's also in Casablanca.  Oh yeah, so are Bogie, Bergman and Rains.  A hell of a cast.

My mom always mentions that Paul Henreid is in Now Voyager. I then always point out that he’s also in Casablanca. Oh yeah, so are Bogie, Bergman and Rains.  And Peter Lorre and Sydney Greenstreet. A hell of a cast.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category.  Films in blue were nominated. For the first time in a long time there are no changes to Academy categories.  But, this is the first year of the Golden Globes – there were no nominees and no distinction between Drama and Comedy, but those films in red in the Globe section won the Globes.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. Casablanca
  2. The Ox-Bow Incident
  3. In Which We Serve
  4. Shadow of a Doubt
  5. For Whom the Bell Tolls

Analysis:  Unlike the last two years, there are actually 6 **** films, which is unfortunate.  I rank The More the Merrier at the same level as Bell, but one of them had to come in 6th.  Then there’s a five point drop to #7 (Watch on the Rhine) and 4 points each for the next two (This Land is Mine, Five Graves to Cairo).  That’s a pretty hefty drop-off in three spots.  Six of those nine films deal with the war; the other three are Ox-Bow, Shadow of a Doubt and Bell (which deals with the Spanish Civil War). (more…)

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