This is the poster I remember so well because it was also the cover of the novelization.

This is the poster I remember so well because it was also the cover of the novelization.

Revisiting Childhood Movies Part VII

Battlestar Galactica

  • Director:  Richard Colla
  • Writer:  Glen A. Larson
  • Producer:  John Dykstra  /  Glen A. Larson
  • Stars:  Richard Hatch, Dirk Benedict, Lorne Greene, Maren Jensen, Herbert Jefferson Jr, John Colicos
  • Studio:  Universal
  • Award Nominations:  none from groups I track
  • Length:  125 min
  • Genre:  Sci-Fi
  • MPAA Rating:  PG
  • Release Date:  18 May 1979
  • Box Office Gross:  unknown
  • My Rating:  ***
  • My Rank:  #47  (year)
  • Nighthawk Nominations:  Best Original Score
  • Nighthawk Notable:  Best Guilty Pleasure
  • First Watched:  on television
  • Number of Times Watched as a Kid:  20+

(more…)

Just read pages 360-62 of Kavalier and Clay and that says it all.

Just read pages 360-62 of Kavalier and Clay and that says it all.

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category.  Films in blue were nominated.  The Academy made only one change in this year, but it was a needed one – changing the two Score categories from Score and Original Score to Scoring of a Dramatic Picture and Scoring of a Musical Picture.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. Citizen Kane
  2. The Maltese Falcon
  3. Fantasia
  4. The Lady Eve
  5. The Little Foxes

Analysis:  This is, in a sense, precisely how it should be – all five of these films are **** films and the next one on the list (High Sierra) isn’t.  It kills me, though, that The Maltese Falcon has to be in the same year as Citizen Kane.  They’ll be more on that down under points. (more…)

What will prove to be stronger?  The power of hatred or the will to live?

What will prove to be stronger? The power of hatred or the will to live?

The 86th annual Academy Awards, for the film year 2013.  The nominations were announced on 16 January 2014 and the awards were held on 2 March 2014.

Best Picture:  12 Years a Slave

  • Gravity
  • The Wolf of Wall Street
  • American Hustle
  • Nebraska
  • Philomena
  • Her
  • Captain Phillips
  • Dallas Buyers Club

Most Surprising Omission:  Inside Llewyn Davis

Best Eligible Film Not Nominated:  Inside Llewyn Davis

Rank (out of 86) Among Best Picture Years:  #8

note:  If they had nominated Inside Llewyn Davis instead of Dallas Buyers Club, this year would have been #3. (more…)

I always knew Alfonso had this film in him.  I never knew Sandra had this performance in her.

I always knew Alfonso had this film in him. I never knew Sandra had this performance in her.

My Top 20:

  1. Gravity
  2. The Wolf of Wall Street
  3. Inside Llewyn Davis
  4. American Hustle
  5. Nebraska
  6. Philomena
  7. 12 Years a Slave
  8. Blue is the Warmest Color
  9. Her
  10. Blue Jasmine
  11. The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
  12. Frozen
  13. Wadjda
  14. Prisoners
  15. The Hunt
  16. August: Osage County
  17. The World’s End
  18. In a World . . .
  19. Captain Phillips
  20. I’m So Excited

note:  There are only three films from this year that I haven’t seen that I have any expectation might eventually make it into my Top 20: The Wind Rises, The Past and The Great Beauty.

(more…)

Joad got out and stood beside the cab window.  The vertical exhaust pipe puttered up its barely visible blue smoke.  Joad leaned toward the driver.  'Homicide,' he said quickly."

“Joad got out and stood beside the cab window. The vertical exhaust pipe puttered up its barely visible blue smoke. Joad leaned toward the driver. ‘Homicide,’ he said quickly.”

You can read more about this year in film here.  The Best Picture race is discussed here, with reviews of all the nominees.  First there are the categories, followed by all the films with their nominations, then the Globes, where I split the major awards by Drama and Comedy, followed by a few lists at the very end.  If there’s a film you expected to see and didn’t, check the very bottom – it might be eligible in a different year.  Films in red won the Oscar in that category.  Films in blue were nominated.  The Academy added two categories this year.

Nighthawk Awards:

  • Best Picture
  1. The Grapes of Wrath
  2. Rebecca
  3. The Philadelphia Story
  4. The Great Dictator
  5. His Girl Friday

(more…)

Sociology, history and a thrilling real crime all wrapped together with pure Crichton entertainment.

Sociology, history and a thrilling real crime all wrapped together with pure Crichton entertainment.

The Great Train Robbery

  • Author:  Michael Crichton  (1942 – 2008)
  • Published:  1975
  • Publisher:  Knopf
  • Pages:  281
  • First Line:  “Forty minutes out of London, passing through the rolling green fields and cherry orchards of Kent, the morning train of the South Eastern Railway attained its maximum speed of fifty-four miles an hour.”
  • Last Line:  “The money from The Great Train Robbery was never recovered.”
  • Film:  1979  (*** – dir. Michael Crichton)
  • First Read:  Spring 1993

(more…)

A picture of Thomas to tide you over.

A picture of Thomas to tide you over.

I’m not precisely certain what the next post will be and I don’t quite know when it will be up.  What it won’t be is the Best Adapted Screenplay for 1940.

Almost seven years after Veronica created this blog to keep people updated on Thomas and well over five years after I hijacked it to pontificate on films and literature (Thomas is now mostly updated through my YouTube page or Veronica’s Facebook, where most of family and friends can watch him grow up), I find myself exhausted.  Several thousand films have been watched, hundreds of reviews have been written, along with six days of work a week, a marriage and a family.

I lack the energy to continue writing a series that takes so long to research (all those books to read, all those films to watch again) and much longer to write (review the film, review the book, talk about the differences).  I started it because I found the idea fascinating and I just can’t bring myself to write more on it.  It’s one thing when you’re going to get in a game of Star Wars Angry Birds before working on your post.  It’s something different when you would rather just keep playing rather than actually write the post.  This isn’t a job and I get no pay for it; if I’m not loving what I do, there’s no point to it.

Or, if you don't come here for Thomas updates, here's a recent picture of Benedict to tide you over.

Or, if you don’t come here for Thomas updates, here’s a recent picture of Benedict to tide you over.

I may continue the Nighthawk Awards, partially because there is so much less in the manner of full-length reviews to write and partially because I enjoy the format of that writing more at the moment.  But I haven’t decided that yet.  I will review the Best Picture nominees sometime after the Oscars.  I will do a 3.0 of the Top 100 Directors, but not until after TSPDT do their new update.

But I really don’t know what I will write and I don’t know when I will write it.  I spent all week at home with a vicious cold.  Usually a single sick day becomes a chance for me to unleash myself on the computer for as long as I can sit upright.  After five days at home I wrote nothing.  So the passion to write something is low.

So, something will come, eventually.  With what length and what frequency, I don’t know.

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